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Observed interview lesson - stand alone or fit to topics?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Vanadesse, May 3, 2012.

  1. Vanadesse

    Vanadesse New commenter

    I've got an interview next week teaching a 30 minute lesson mixed ability Year 2 class. I've found on the school website the plan of what the class is doing in each subject this term. Would it be a good idea to plan a lesson that fits in with something they're doing or should I pick something that is stand alone and doesn't need any prior knowledge? Part of me thinks that stand alone would be good because I don't want to risk doing something similar to what they've already done in that topic, so it being to easy or boring. I've got an idea for either way, just wondering which would be best to go for.
     
  2. Vanadesse

    Vanadesse New commenter

    I've got an interview next week teaching a 30 minute lesson mixed ability Year 2 class. I've found on the school website the plan of what the class is doing in each subject this term. Would it be a good idea to plan a lesson that fits in with something they're doing or should I pick something that is stand alone and doesn't need any prior knowledge? Part of me thinks that stand alone would be good because I don't want to risk doing something similar to what they've already done in that topic, so it being to easy or boring. I've got an idea for either way, just wondering which would be best to go for.
     
  3. Hi
    You sound super organised I would be careful of lonking into their topic only because the sigh of 'we've done this with ...' can really throw you when being observed. If the school have designated an area of learnng that seems to very much link in then they may be wanting that but I would go for original and demonstrate how your lesson would fit in a wider context or theme of work etc.
    Good luck!!
     
  4. Vanadesse

    Vanadesse New commenter

    That's what I was thinking, I'd hate to get in there and find out that they've already done what I've got planned! So I think I'm going to go with something that I've come up with myself. Now just have to decide what! Thanks for the reply.
     
  5. It would be a tick in your box to show you've done your research though. Perhaps you can say something like "I know you have been working on XXX but today we are going to have a very special lesson on XXX"
     
  6. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Linking to their topic is a good idea, but make sure you do something obscure enough that you don't annoy their teacher by doing what they planned for the following week.
     
  7. Vanadesse

    Vanadesse New commenter

    That was the other concern, stealing the teachers next lesson!



    Their PSHE topic is feelings and I was thinking about maybe reading them a story and then answering some questions on it then taking about their own feelings like in the book. So that way it kind of links but I doubt I'm stealing the teacher's lesson.



    I'm struggling to know what to plan content wise though. It's only 30 minutes and so it's not a great deal of time for them to complete any kind of written task but then at the same time it's also too long for them to be sat on the carpet really. I'm thinking it should be a longer teaching session with short activity at the end, does this sound about right? Or should I stick with carpet time but put in lots of things like talking partners, hot seating or things like that to break up?
     
  8. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Get them up and 'doing' something. A practical task to complete.
     
  9. littlerussell

    littlerussell New commenter

    Do you know what their topics are because the school have told you in the invite letter?

    If so, I think they would probably want to link in to it in some way?
     
  10. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    What exactly have the school asked you to do? I was asked to 'teach a lesson that exemplified my strengths'. So I did. And I got the job!!!! !!!! !!!! (this is me being amazed!)
    So following that experience I would say teach to your strengths. (it's music for me) If you haven't been given a particular subject they want to see treat this as an opportunity for you to show something that you do really well, and that you can offer the school. If you can possibly link to a subject they are looking for school-wide, then all to the good.
    Again, teach to your strengths. Come up with a nice little lesson that you would be pleased to teach to anyone (where they will be learning something new, ofc ofc, etc, etc), regardless of the outcome.
    Good luck. Show 'em what you're made of.
     
  11. kerrytd

    kerrytd New commenter

    If you are looking for something for PSHE you could use this 2 minute animated clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK8DHlXTKhA - honesty. Lots of opportunity for discussion, predicting what might happen or what the options are for the character - talk partners, hotseating. If you wanted a writing activity you could have a picture of the character in the middle of an A3 sheet then if children are on table groups, ask each child to write what they think the character should do, or if at the end write whether they thought the character was honest and why.
     
  12. Vanadesse

    Vanadesse New commenter

    Probably is a good idea to get them up and moving, that's why I'm not too keen on just half an hour of carpet time. Think for 6-7 year olds that's a VERY long time.



    No the school didn't give me that topic list, it's just what I found on their website. They've said that I can pick absolutely anything.
     
  13. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    Then do something that 1. Teaches them something new and 2. Shows you off to your best advantage.
     
  14. linre

    linre New commenter

    We have had interviews all week this week using my year 2 class as those being taught...so here's what I found out!
    1. Those that rung me as their class teacher and asked about the children's levels, abilities and what we had been learning about were definately at an advantage and the HT asked which candidates had done this.
    2. Nearly every candidate did a lesson on adjectives and describing objects/pictures with the post it notes to write your words on and then we write a sentence. It became boring for the kids...try to do something that makes you stand out and gets the kids excited.
     

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