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observed for GCSE prep - looking for ideas

Discussion in 'English' started by gerbiljess, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. I'm being observed in a couple of weeks teaching a small group of low ability year 11s - we are working through the exam paper and also have a couple of the speaking and listening tasks left to do - I'd be grateful for any ideas on how to make what is potentially a dry teaching area a bit lively for the ob.... help!
     
  2. I'm being observed in a couple of weeks teaching a small group of low ability year 11s - we are working through the exam paper and also have a couple of the speaking and listening tasks left to do - I'd be grateful for any ideas on how to make what is potentially a dry teaching area a bit lively for the ob.... help!
     
  3. roamingteacher

    roamingteacher Occasional commenter Forum guide

    I've no idea what spec you're doing or what the constraints are but why not tap into their passions for the S&L and do something that will be lively and interesting for them? For example (completely off the top of my head - I've not tried it): get them to identify something that is very important to them e.g. football, music, cinema, gaming or whatever. Then, tell them that the Ministry of Entertainment is either going to have to get rid of one for financial reasons, or has a huge grant to invest in one. They then have to come up with a convincing presentation that defends their choice while fending off arguments from others. As they're so involved with their topic anyway, they should be able to speak fluently about why it's worth saving/investing in but they'll have prepared beforehand anyway and so have time to gather opinions from those they share the passion with.


    I find that if you focus more on engaging the learners, the less you have to worry about the observers...
     

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