1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Observation blues

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by tomkins15, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. tomkins15

    tomkins15 New commenter

    During my induction around 2 years ago, I was getting lesson observation gradings of 'good' or 'good' with 'excellent' features. I don't know what has happened but now I can't seem to get above 'satisfactory' with some 'good' elements. I did have a horrible time at my last school which dented my confidence. I left that school when the fixed-term contract expired because I was being bullied, although I did nothing about this for fear of reprisal. I have since been temping for various schools and since November, I have been employed as a full time teacher at a nice school. I have just had a performance management observation which got a 'satisfactory' grading. I spent such a long time preparing for this, but wondering what has happened. I work and try really hard, but I can't seem to get back up to that 'good' grading. I am a harsh critic of myself and feel that nothing I do is good enough anyway, but it doesn't help that I get paid only the daily temping rate, despite the extra duties and hours and hours of extra work. I'm grateful to have work, but it does eat away at me a little. I suppose I feel a bit cross that I am doing all this extra, inc. lesson obs and parents' evenings for no extra money. Maybe I am just making excuses.
     
  2. tomkins15

    tomkins15 New commenter

    During my induction around 2 years ago, I was getting lesson observation gradings of 'good' or 'good' with 'excellent' features. I don't know what has happened but now I can't seem to get above 'satisfactory' with some 'good' elements. I did have a horrible time at my last school which dented my confidence. I left that school when the fixed-term contract expired because I was being bullied, although I did nothing about this for fear of reprisal. I have since been temping for various schools and since November, I have been employed as a full time teacher at a nice school. I have just had a performance management observation which got a 'satisfactory' grading. I spent such a long time preparing for this, but wondering what has happened. I work and try really hard, but I can't seem to get back up to that 'good' grading. I am a harsh critic of myself and feel that nothing I do is good enough anyway, but it doesn't help that I get paid only the daily temping rate, despite the extra duties and hours and hours of extra work. I'm grateful to have work, but it does eat away at me a little. I suppose I feel a bit cross that I am doing all this extra, inc. lesson obs and parents' evenings for no extra money. Maybe I am just making excuses.
     
  3. Don't be too hard on yourself. Remember Ofsted are continually moving the goalposts/setting new criteria etc.
     
  4. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    Have you asked for specific feedback on what you can do to improve? How about asking to observe a teacher that is considered excellent / good - could that help? Best of luck
     
  5. What you need is specific constructive advice on your lesson and a discussion about expectations. Very often observations are done and gradings provided with littl;e specific information on exactly HOW the lesson could be improved. So ask for the HOW. Better still ask to observe the observer teaching so you can see 'good' in practice - expecislly if they have provided specifics of what a good lesson should look like (don't be surprised if the observer is evasive and does not wish to be observed - they can rarely like uo to their expectations of others).
    The idea that observations always focus on negatives stuns me - if you provided feedback to children that wqas only negative with no positives and no indications of HOW the child can improve you would be righjtly criticised, yet these same teachers feel that it is acceptable todo this to adults - it isn't. Feedback MUST provide positive, negative then developmental ideas and end on a positive otherewise it simply demotivates - as it has done here.
    The problem lies with the observer not with you.
    James
     
  6. tomkins15

    tomkins15 New commenter

    Thank you for the encouraging words and advice. I'll keep that all in mind.
     
  7. bobbycatrules

    bobbycatrules New commenter

    Bear in mind that sometimes, even if you ask the observer how to improve next time, they can't tell you because they don't know themselves. This has happened to me and it is very frustrating.
     

Share This Page