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Oblong or rectangle?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by carriecat10, Sep 29, 2007.

  1. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Occasional commenter

    Interested to know what you think ... I've always taught a square and an oblong are both rectangles and have made sure children understand this, but still have problems persuading rest of staff. Is it important enough or am I just being pedantic?
     
  2. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Occasional commenter

    Interested to know what you think ... I've always taught a square and an oblong are both rectangles and have made sure children understand this, but still have problems persuading rest of staff. Is it important enough or am I just being pedantic?
     
  3. You are right.

    I was corrected by an inspector regarding my use of the word sums.

    I now cite this as an example to staff. You end up intentionally dumbing yourself down in front of staff.

    SUMS are addition - please use calculation.

    It did work.
     
  4. You are correct. We had a whole lecture on naming shapes last year (lots of fun obviously-yawn) but they did teach us to say that.
     
  5. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Occasional commenter

    thank you ... I shall keep nagging then!
     
  6. trinity0097

    trinity0097 New commenter

    If you look back at the resource sheets for the old unit plans Year 6, Unit 8 sheet 8.1 has the correct definitions and properties that you should be teaching to the children. (and staff!)

    Also please note some teachers that there is no such shape as a diamond! Was appalled to find out when doing shapes with Yr 5 last week that two thirds of the class honestly believed and had been told/taught that a diamond was an official shape (from about 4 different schools!)
     
  7. Oblongs are any shape longer than it is wide - rectangle, oval, etc. It certainly does not mean 'rectangle'. All rectangles are oblongs, but not all oblongs are rectangles.

    I believe the common term for an oblong these days is "rounded rectangle".
     
  8. trinity0097

    trinity0097 New commenter

    Where on earth have you got that definition Brendon?

    Oblongs in my book are rectangles that specifically cannot be a square.
     
  9. yme

    yme

    a rectangle is a 4 sided shape with 4 right angles.

    some rectangles are squares - 4 sided shape with 4 right angles which also have 4 equal sides.

    some rectangles are oblong rectangles - 4 sided shape with 4 right angles which have 2 pairs of equal sides.

    so - all squares are rectangles, but all rectangles are not squares, and all oblongs are rectangles, but all rectangles are not oblongs.

    I've certainly never heard of ovals being oblongs.
     
  10. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

    According to The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics,

    oblong = rectangle or rectangular.


    However, personally I share trinity's view, using oblong to define a non-square rectangle.
     
  11. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

  12. I think we are getting in a dreadful muddle here.

    Brenden has thrown in a tremendous amount of confusion by stating what an oblong is (and everyone agrees with this: UK and US) but then follows this up with a statement of his/her own that is the reverse.

    Brenden says: "all rectangles are oblongs."

    Oh no they're not. By your own definition.

    I'm not really sure why any of us use the term 'oblong' anyway. It is such a silly word and really has no purpose.
     
  13. Just to clarify why Brenden is wrong:

    A square is a rectangle and is most definitely not an oblong. So all rectangles are not oblongs.
     
  14. trinity0097

    trinity0097 New commenter

    There is a question on an old KS3 paper that we use in Yr 8 that specifically refers to oblongs as far as I can remember!

    There is a picture of a square on a square grid and you have to tick the correct words to match it (part b of a 2 part question)

    options I think are:

    quadrilateral
    parallelogram
    oblong
    square
     
  15. trinity - I had exactly your problem with diamond this week. Luckily my class all came from same school so I need to take this one up with KS1 teachers!
     
  16. Our LA Numeracy adviser has told us to use the word "oblong" where we would have previously used rectangle and "regular rectangle" instead of a square (because it is a regular shape). I teach Year 2 and it's not just the children who are confused - trying to change a concept like that after 28 years is pretty tricky! lol
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    According to University of Cambs oblong is ~
    Another word for rectangle. (Sometimes it is said that an oblong is a rectangle whose sides are different lengths; so a square is a special type of rectangle but it is not an oblong.)

    personally never heard of an oval referred to as oblong
     
  18. jog_on

    jog_on New commenter

    I agree 100% with what Trinity said.

    I, too, have never heard of an oval being described as an oblong.

     
  19. Fair call! I should have said that all non-square rectangles are oblongs, but not all oblongs are non-square rectangles.
     
  20. trinity0097

    trinity0097 New commenter

    I think that your 2nd part of your definition Brendon must be the definition in somewhere like the States rather than over here.

    There is no mention anywhere in any of my British publications, QCA things etc that mentions oblongs as anything other than rectangles that can't be squares (or words to that effect)
     

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