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Obesity and Mobility Scooters

Discussion in 'Personal' started by ilovesooty, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    Of course he won't, because he can't. To Ritchie, the poor, those on benefits of any kind, and the disabled are on a par with the freak shows so beloved of people in Victorian times: worthy of a delicate shudder and a thankfulness that he doesn't have to mix with them.
     
  2. And whilst you are studying their vast backsides and pondering on their right to use the sidewalk (huh?) - did you wave them down and ask whether they are already doing something to lose the flab you find so abhorrent?
    Do you know, by looking, if they were 20 pound heavier last month? Do you know, by looking, if they are doing anything to lose weight?
    Richie - you used to have style. You used to care.
    You have lost it. You are not the Richie you once were.
    Sad.
     
  3. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    I do have to disagree with the disparagement of fatties on trikes. It is their life and if that is their best choice then good luck to them. They will need it in the bookies. I don't have a problem with paying taxes, it assists in achieving the common good. General happiness is the goal and if limited mobility doesn't suit then scooters are money well spent.
    I think it might be an idea to broaden your philosophy R, you are being mean.

     
  4. moonpenny

    moonpenny New commenter

    I've seen many people using mobility scooters who are all sorts of shapes,sizes and ages. They must make all the difference between being housebound and being able to get out and do a bit of shopping independently.
    None of us know other people's circumstances.
    When one of my grandmas needed a hip operation years ago, all of her 10 children put money together and paid for her to have it done privately. I know my mum and dad were skint at the time so I am not sure how much they put in.
    You can get scooters second hand so much cheaper and again, you'll find that family will put together to help out the cost.
    As others have pointed out, if someone is having trouble being mobile, they will put on weight more easily so it is a vicious circle.
    And of course, the newsworthy bit is the small minority of people who chose to defraud the system and make it worse for those who genuinely rely on incapacity benefits to get by.
     
  5. All very interesting. Any thoughts on the fact that there are no wheel chairs available in hospital when you have broken your leg and are not allowed to put any weight on it. Crutching on one leg two days after surgery in great pain to a car took an hour. Not that I'm bitter or any thing! And just for the information of the original poster I'm not overweight and pretty fit.
     
  6. [​IMG]
    [Snigger!]
     
  7. Wow the NHS could use your power of deduction.
    Have a think about this, if you have arthritis or asthma you may well be put on steroids, it is impossible for you to exercise and unless you starve yourself you will put on weight.
    Maybe you have both arthritis and ashtma, oh and in my case add an underactive thyroid - then try to stay thin.
     
  8. As my mother became less mobile, she was expecting a reduction in appetite. Didn't happen. There is no link at all between enjoying your food and sitting down all day.
     
  9. Richie Millions

    Richie Millions New commenter

    Such a splendid discussion thank you all sweeties for your contributions x
     
  10. Oh richie, what a card you are.
     
  11. You missed one. [​IMG]
     
  12. harsh-but-fair

    harsh-but-fair Senior commenter

    Card wasn't the word I had in mind, although it is similar ...
     
  13. Indeed!
    I find Richie's observations on people with restricted mobility even odder since he/she said they had held 'the highest position possible' in 'many' schools.
    You would think being SMT in many schools would mean you'd seen your fair share of social problems. Even independent schools aren't exempt from them. [​IMG]
     
  14. wow

    i have never had a post pulled before

    i know i was offensive but not, imo, more offensive than the OP is
     
  15. Richie Millions

    Richie Millions New commenter

    Of course there could be an interesting debate on what is the highest position possible in a school? However Choccie you seem to have made it your business to trail me and attack me personally over a number of threads without actually discussing the issues. Some people ride mobility scooters because they are too lazy to walk. Would you just ignore this or could you perhaps put your mind to a practical solution x
     
  16. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    Name three of them.
     
  17. Richie Millions

    Richie Millions New commenter

    Jonathan Clarkson
    Fiona Hewitt
    Ann Lewis

    Silly girl x
     
  18. I have attacked you personally because I mistook you for a woman?!
    I repeat that your attitude is very odd in view of your previous experience as holder of 'the highest position possible' in 'many' schools. You must surely have encountered many social issues while you held such posts.
     
  19. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    What is wrong with being a woman?
    apart from the obvious.
     
  20. That's what I'd like to know!
    [​IMG]
     

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