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Nutricious Comfort Food

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by modelmaker, Apr 29, 2011.

  1. That is odd.

     
  2. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    He is odd.
     
  3. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I've found myself, that couscous has an abnormal reaction on me as well. Nothing quite as bad as stomach cramps but a distinct adverse reaction.
    I have to confess my ignorance, celtic, but I have no idea what spelt actually is. Whenever you've mentioned it before I presumed, and I can't say why, it was some variation of bacon we wouldn't encounter in the UK.
    I'll try your recipe, but the probability, as you suggest, is I shall need to find a health food shop. Unless of course, spelt is known under another name here and spelled differently.
    Like the idea of start from scratch pizzas, EG. I've made an Anton Mossiman recipe a few times that always goes down a treat. You start by making the dough using a light bread flour with seeds in. I can't at this moment remember the term for a typical bread, but we all eat it.
    Cut up some fresh tomatoes, removing all the core, finely chop and drain off the liquid and smother over your pizza base, then bake until the bread has risen. Cover with soured cream, smoked salmon and some dill then flash under a hot grill for a very brief period. 30 seconds max.
    I think that was the recipe, I haven't cooked it for a few years, but I'm sure I posted the definitive version a long time ago.
     
  4. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    Its a type of grain which has many uses. I had some vodka which was made using spelt at a friends house once.
     
  5. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    It's a type of wheat. An ancient one. The Romans went mental for it. I tend to trust the Romans, by and large.

     
  6. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    I agree too.
    Oh, and at the risk of sounding pedantic it's 'nutriTious' not 'nutriCious' [​IMG]
     
  7. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I acknowleged my late onset dyslexlia earlier, Belle. It's an interesting thread. Take the trouble to read it all and add your own contributions. The aim is to offer simple to cook, healthier alternaives to, just as quick to make than the time it takes to obtain a takeaway, and more enjoyable food to eat, as well, as being less expensive.
     
  8. I have been mentioning it for years. It hurts me that you have no idea what it is.
     
  9. MM, in all honesty, I do not believe you have tried any recipe I have posted.
    I have explicitely challenged you and there has been no feed back.
    It makes me feel like you do not care.
    This is a wee haven of sharing, but you do not share. You tell and do not take.
    It makes me very sad.
    Others have tried my recipes and given me feed back. You never have.
     
  10. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    Shussh! celtic, everyone will realise we're married to each other. [​IMG]
    I will make an effort to address this, and I'll give you feedback.
    I'll be honest and say that my prime concern when I cook is to feed mrs modelmaker something I know she'll eat as she needs building up and do it as well as I can with whatever I have available rather than focus on feeding myself. It's not an uncommon occurance, as it'd been today when I don't eat very much of what I cook other than a taste here and there. She's dined on a smoked gammon joint today accompanied by my latest variation of cauliflower cheese that I added spinach to. I'll probably have some of the gammon in a sandwich in a while, and use the remainder of the cauliflower cheese to freeze into patties.
    We can't easily judge other people's lives by our own, as each present their own set of unique circumstances. In my case today, as I've finally been able to walk freely, I took on the mammoth task of getting to grips with my overgrown lawn that I've been unable to attend to over the previous month. It exhausted me so I had to recover by sitting down at the computer with some beers and attempt to ponder the reasons for obesity with you.
    She enjoyed her meal in good time though, although I wasn't ready to eat with her myself, and it's often the case as mealtimes frequently coincide with TV programmes she enjoys but I loathe and prefer to not be around. It isn't ideal, and I'm reminded of an interview I watched when Gordon Ramsey told us that most nights after a long stint in his restaurant, once all the clearing up had been done, all the chefs would retire to a greasy spoon cafe at 3.00 am for an early breakfast rather than cook for themselves.
    Most of the time we don't eat together, but I enjoy cooking for her, judging how my efforts panned out from sampling it, relaxing and eating what I fancy myself, later.
    However, I will endeavour to obtain some spelt, now I know what it is, try your recipes and give you some feedback, so long as you promise not to start throwing plates at me if you disagree with my comments. Lots of love, X
     
  11. MM, I feel a bit guilty. If I remember rightly, you mentioned once upon a time that your wife has alzeimers?
    I think I need to take back anything I have said, as I have so much admiration for you. Forget my strops as you get on my ****, but you are a much better person than me.

     
  12. My favourite comfort food is macaroni cheese. I love all different types of cheeses in it and usually just make a basic white sauce, fling in nutmeg or a tsp english mustard and then add cheese. I thought about doing skimmed milk, half fat cheddar but I really don't like reduced fat cheese, i think it's v rubbery. I have tried it using less cheese but usin g a very strong cheddar instead.
    My husband will only eat white pasta sauce which is usually so much more calorific than a tomato based one. Anyone know any lighter recipes?

    TBH it's my portion size that is th problem - I could eat macaroni cheese like it's going out of style. Any better ways to make it healthier?


     
  13. Lots, but they taste ****.
    If you are going to eat it, you must enjoy it.
    That was drummed into me when I was starving myself to death.
    And when they asked me what I liked to eat, I could reel off all sorts.
    When they asked me why I denied myself pleasure, I had no answer.
    When they asked me who was I trying to please, I had no answer/
    When they asked me if I wanted to die, I said no.
    And then they told me to wake up and see food as my freind.
    Fat, sugar, carbs. They mean me no harm.

     
  14. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    No, that was what I imagined she might have from her behavour. I've since discovered it's most likely to have been a consequence of withdrawal symptoms from the prescripion drug she's been addicted to that our more recent doctors have been geting her off. It's been a long struggle all the same, and I wouldn't pretend for a second it's as bad as alzeimers.
    One of my friend's mother suffers from alzeimers and it's been heartbreaking to watch her gradual demise, I doubt she'll last another year if I'm honest, and of course, impossible to do anything significant about it other than to care. Around 5 years ago I accidentally knocked a glass of red wine into her lapa nd she coated me about iit in a similar manner you would have, celtic. These days I doubt she's even notice.
    However, thank you for your apology, albeit based on misinformation on my part, I think I am indeed wouthy of your admiration however for the devotion I attempt to give my sweetheart and the hard struggle it's been to get her back on track again over many years. Saner people would have left when the going got tough, but there's always been a battle for power in our relationship that kept it going strong, and I have no intention of losing the excitement of it through her current ill health.
    And underpinning all this is the humour we share. Despite all the flak I get from my portrayal of her, she herslf, loves the caricture I've built around her, occasionally going out of her way to add to it.
    Please feel free to resume normal hostilities when you feel fit without remorse. I'll tell you when, and if, I've ever had enough.
     
  15. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    Like you, I dislike mild cheese. You need to add so much to make a meal enjoyable. By using mature cheese can get away with a lot less. There are probably other ways you can make the dish more satisfying and healthier. I can't offer these myself as I'm not a fan of macaronni cheese. The pasta dishes I personally like invariably include a tomato base with some chilli and we move up onwards from there. Cheese will often feature in them in some way,but maybe only a few shreds of parmesan on the top from my faithful Good Grips peeler.
    Why don't we go back a step and ask you why you think you eat portion sizes you're uncomfortable with? What else do you eat during the day? Is it a case your body is craving a return to a healthy blood-sugar level that inclines you to eat large potions?
     
  16. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

  17. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Hardly in the spirit of the thread, but I right fancy a Big Mac, me. Might make our annual visit to Maccy D's today, perhaps with a visit to the cinema to watch a trashy film afterwards!
    Sorry........we've all got to lower our standards sometimes...[​IMG]
     
  18. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    I tried a Big Mac once and found it disgusting with the sauces in it! Last time I went to MacDonalds was on a work exrerience visit to visit a year 10 boy, I was offered anything I liked from the menu, I had a bottle of chilled water!!
     
  19. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    I have read it MM and it is interesting.
    One food that is yummy but has a bad reputation is burgers.
    Here's my recipe.
    I use 500g of 10% fat mince and 500g 5% fat mince (this keeps burgers moist but lower in fat)
    Add 3 slices of bread, blitzed to crumbs, a handful of chopped parsley, a dollop of ketchup, a splash of Worcestershire sauce, a finely chopped onion, a tablespoon of flour, a beaten egg, salt and pepper.
    Now, wash hands and knead the lot together for a couple of minutes. Really squish it all up....it's rather theraputic.
    Now form into burgers, cook and enjoy (they freeze well too)
    Really yummy, low fat, nutritious and comforting!
    Hope you do try this MM [​IMG]
     
  20. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    One of the things that interests me is the attitude supermarkets have in selling their own "takeaways" Potentially, this could be a substantial market for them, yet the range they offer is quite small, particularly when you compare it to other prepared meals they offer. Tesco offer 3 differnt ranges of lasagne, for example, from the budget, to the supposedly fit for a king range. I've tried an Indian and a Chinese pack and they both tasted vile and unrepresentitive of dishes with similar names I've bought at takeaways. I haven't tried any of their lasagnes so conclusions you might draw from this should be made with caution.
    It occurs to me that there is potentially a ready market waiting to be had for supermarkets they've yet not exploited. It's clear from the number of food programmes on TV there is a substantial interest in cooking. The irony of it all is that instead of creating a trend where more people cook from scratch for themselves, fewer are doing so. It's possibly because people don't have a lot of the ingredients in their store cupboard, possibly because they might be scattered throughout all 4 corners of the shop so people struggle to find everything and it may be that the overall cost of buying everything you need for a meal in one go becomes restrictively expensive. By this, I mean you may only need half a teaspoon of a spice, yet you have to buy a jar of it.
    Maybe supermarkets could sell packs of fresh ingredients for a particular dish with everything you need but just enough of each ingredient to make it work. If a popular cooking programme went out and the following week, packs of ingredients were sold for the recipes that had been shown, it might entice more people to have a go.
     

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