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Nursery parents evening!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by lizzii_2008, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. lizzii_2008

    lizzii_2008 New commenter

    I'm an NQT and very nervous for my first parents evening this week!
    I just wondered if any other Nursery teachers could offer any advice about the key things I should be saying or that parents would want to hear about.
    Do I share with them their achievements via the Development Matters or just a general overview?
    Any help would be much appreciated!
     
  2. lizzii_2008

    lizzii_2008 New commenter

    I'm an NQT and very nervous for my first parents evening this week!
    I just wondered if any other Nursery teachers could offer any advice about the key things I should be saying or that parents would want to hear about.
    Do I share with them their achievements via the Development Matters or just a general overview?
    Any help would be much appreciated!
     
  3. All teachers handle parent consultations differently. I try and think about it from the parents point of view. All they really want to know about is has their child settled, are they making friends, are they "normal".
    I always start off by asking the parent how they feel the child is getting on, or asking if they have any worries or concerns. This avoids you chatting on for 10 minutes about how nicely little Freddie shares the cars and isn't it lovely that he is making some new friends, when all the parents really wants to talk about is the fact that little Freddie is a goblin at home and beats up the new baby.
    Sometimes the parents want to know how they are getting on in terms of the curriculum, but it is unlikely that any of the parents (unless they are teachers) will know about development matters.
    We have 2 parent consultations a year. Our first is in October when we do the settling in talk, any concerns, referrals to speech and language, etc. The second is in March when I generally update parents on progress and share learning journeys.
    As a parent of a nursery aged child myself, all I want to know about is whether she is behaving appropriately, getting along with other children, making friends, being kind, and enjoying her time at nursery. When my son was at nursery 3 years ago, he didn't really do any of those things and all I needed to hear from his nursery teachers was that they still loved him and that they had strategies in place to help him. I didn't want to hear a long list of all his wrongdoings, just that there were interventions that were in place to either stop the wrongdoings before they started or to follow up on the inappropriate behaviour.
    It might help you to write a few notes on each child so that you don't forget to tell them anything (or ask them anything).
    Hope it goes OK.
     
  4. In my experience most parents want to know if their children are well-behaved and able to share, have made friends, and are learning. You coukd show them the development matters, but give a general overview rather than looking at it in detail. You may need to describe to some parents how CI works, as some wonder why their children play all day! Many parents are very eager to tell you all their child can do at home, but you may need to explain that it's great they can recite and recognise numbers to 10 and that you are working on their counting 10 objects correctly, and that it's great they can write their name or recite the alphabet, but they need to learn correct letter formation and letter sounds. It's always a good time, as well, to mention stuff such as writing names on uniform (if you have one), any issues with tiredness, hunger, toilet problems and to stress that punctuality and attendance are important in nursery. You could have crib sheets of the main points for parents to take, and perhaps a letter formation sheet and a sheet with some of the rhymes you use.
     

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