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NQT

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by l_howard87, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. Hello
    I am after some tips and advice.
    I have a small bottom set class and there are a number of large characters in this class. One child in particular I sat at the back so that he couldn't turn around and distract, then he claimed he couldn't see. He is now at the front constantly turning round.
    A few of the other members of the class once distracted lose all focus. I am being observed with this class in a few weeks and I am worried about the lesson as the pace is often affected by poor behaviour.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Hello
    I am after some tips and advice.
    I have a small bottom set class and there are a number of large characters in this class. One child in particular I sat at the back so that he couldn't turn around and distract, then he claimed he couldn't see. He is now at the front constantly turning round.
    A few of the other members of the class once distracted lose all focus. I am being observed with this class in a few weeks and I am worried about the lesson as the pace is often affected by poor behaviour.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated!
     
  3. How about a quick call home to the main culprit's parents? Or a departmental detention? You could also try a whole class reward - rather than punishment system. One way is to write a pupils name on paper, put it in an envelope, and say if, by the end of the lesson, that 'mystery pupil' has behaved well, the whole class will get a small treat next lesson. That way they all feel collectively bound to each other, as misbehaving will make them massively unpopular. Appalling that we have to do these things, I know, but sometimes praise works better than sanctions, doesn't it. Good luck.
     
  4. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    You'll get tips and advice galore here!
    Can I make one suggestion based on my experience of students and NQTs? Hints and tips are, in the long run, not enough. Its about you thinking deeply about the whole philosophy of your classroom.
    Decide in detail
    (a) what kind of classroom you want
    (b) what sort of relationships you want with your pupils
    (c) what techniques, strategies and resources you need to commit to and apply consistently to achieve that.
    Hints and tips are fine, but they are reactive to a situation: as a new teacher, you need to be much more proactive, so that you shape the nature of the classroom from the very first moment you walk in the door. All pupils - well and badly behaved, low and high ability - know exactly what to expect from you all the time.
    I'd always start by immersing yourself in positive assertive discipline methods to establish your position as the centre of the classroom. It takes work, planning and preparation, and doesn't work overnight. But then, nothing does: behaviour management is a movable feast.
     
  5. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

  6. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

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