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NQT thinking of teaching English overseas

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by Scooby_786, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. Scooby_786

    Scooby_786 New commenter

    I am an NQT (qualified in July 2011) and have found
    it difficult to secure a teaching post thus far. I have always thought of teaching
    English overseas (South Korea). And due to the huge supply of humanities
    teachers and the lack of demand for them, as well as other personal factors, I am
    genuinely considering teaching English overseas for 6 months or a year.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Just wondering whether, as an NQT yet to have completed
    induction, I would be disadvantaged when applying for humanities jobs when I
    return.
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    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>I have had enough of day to day supply too.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

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    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Please advise
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

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    </font>PS &ndash; I have posted this in the other roles too so
    that I can a wider perspective &ndash; but please do not let this deter you from
    replying on this thread
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  2. Scooby_786

    Scooby_786 New commenter

    I am an NQT (qualified in July 2011) and have found
    it difficult to secure a teaching post thus far. I have always thought of teaching
    English overseas (South Korea). And due to the huge supply of humanities
    teachers and the lack of demand for them, as well as other personal factors, I am
    genuinely considering teaching English overseas for 6 months or a year.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Just wondering whether, as an NQT yet to have completed
    induction, I would be disadvantaged when applying for humanities jobs when I
    return.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>I have had enough of day to day supply too.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Please advise
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>PS &ndash; I have posted this in the other roles too so
    that I can a wider perspective &ndash; but please do not let this deter you from
    replying on this thread
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
     
  3. doctorinthetardis

    doctorinthetardis New commenter

    Do it! Imagine the places and the things you will see, the new culture and people! Go for it would be what I would say.
    Why don't you try applying for posts at International schools? You may well be able to secure a post.
    Every school and head will differ when you come back and are applying for jobs but I'm sure some will understand your motivations in going. It shows initiatve rather than sitting aroundwith the odd day here and there for supply.
    I graduated in 2010 and went overseas in the Sept. Now in my second year of working at a beautiful international school in Asia :D Love it!


     
  4. Scooby_786

    Scooby_786 New commenter

    Thank you for your advice doctorinthetardis. I have been looking at international humanities posts but almost all of them are asking for at least two years experience - something which I do not yet have.
    True, I just have to convince recruiters when I get back my motivations in going and that I still have what it takes to teach here.
    Have you done the PGCE and are you teaching english as a second language? What country are you placed in?
     
  5. But what happens if they do not receive any applicants with the two years experience? They will move on to the next set of applicants. It is an 'ideal' for some of these schools but many will interview based on a strong application even if you only have under a year of fulltime experience. Ironically I managed to secure three international school interviews after only a few months into the job, and now I have three years experience and I havent has one since, despite multiple applications! It is about luck, timing and a good application, so apply, even if you don't tick every single one of the boxes, you might be surprised by the result!
     
  6. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    A lot of what you say is true and the OP should definitely apply for a post that they are interested in, but there are a couple of caveats.
    1. It is very unlikely that a school will not receive an application from a single applicant without two years of teaching experience. Especially for a humanities position.
    2. Most schools that recruit inexperienced staff do so for a combination of reasons: financial, unprofessional, expectation that staff will leave quickly. Occasionally it may genuinely be that they have to recruit late and cannot expect to find experienced staff at the stage. At least not experienced staff that anybody would really want to take on.
    3. As an inexperienced teacher you are relatively cheap to hire and finding jobs isn't too difficult. As you become more experienced, your requirements become more exacting, the schools become more demanding in their requirements and the applicants that you compete against are much stronger. It thus becomes more difficult to find a position. In the more desirable countries it is completely normal to be up against one or two hundred applicants for a position. Quite a large number of these have no chance, but equally as well there will be at least 5-10 that are perfectly capable of doing the job. At this stage, even minor differences become important.
    Good luck and all the best.
     
  7. doctorinthetardis

    doctorinthetardis New commenter

    I did a BA (Hons) in Primary Education, not a PGCE. I'm working as an Early Years teacher in Asia.
    As all the previous posters have said, it will be difficult to find a post with such limited experience. However, it is possible.
    To be honest, although I know I should go back to do my NQT year, I am loving what I'm doing here. I am not too worried at the moment about getting it done. I'm just continuing developing my teaching knowledge and practice. I'm also having an amazing time overseas, thanking my lucky stars I have been so fortunate in getting this job at such a lovely school! In my view, when I go back, yes ... others will be more current and some heads might not view my experiences favourably, but ... I will be able to show inititive and an ability to adapt to new cutltures and experiences, I will have recent long term experience, which I think translates into a very positive position whereby heads can apppoint an NQT on a relatively cheap salary who is experienced. Well I hope so anyway!

    Good luck. PM me if you want any advice ... Whenever I write on here, I think of The Hippo who is always so enthusiastic about teaching overseas. I love his attitude .. Totally agree with him. Go for it :D
     
  8. I was in exactly the same situation.

    Finished my PGCE, supply for a year, no permanent work. Decided to do a CELTA ESOL and thought with this terrible economic crisis that wasn't going to change anytime soon, I should go abroad. So I did, I'm not teaching Science but I'm teaching English for Academic Purposes. So unsure what impact this may have if and when I return to the UK for a teaching post. However I am learning Chinese and I am experiencing a totally different culture from one that I am accustomed to. It's something worth thinking about if your struggling to finding a post in the UK.
     
  9. Scooby_786

    Scooby_786 New commenter

    thank you for your advice guys. i have applied for some humanities and tefl posts. will let you know if i hear anything.
     

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