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NQT thinking of teaching abroad

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by Scooby_786, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. Scooby_786

    Scooby_786 New commenter

    I am an NQT (qualified in July 2011) and have found it difficult to secure a teaching post thus far. I have always thought of teaching English overseas (South Korea). And due to the huge supply of humanities teachers and the lack of demand for them, as well as other personal factors, I am genuinely considering teaching English overseas for 6 months or a year.
    Just wondering whether, as an NQT yet to have completed induction, I would be disadvantaged when applying for humanities jobs when I return.
    I have had enough of day to day supply too.
    Please advise
    PS – I have posted this in the other roles too so that I can a wider perspective – but please do not let this deter you from replying on this thread
     
  2. Scooby_786

    Scooby_786 New commenter

    I am an NQT (qualified in July 2011) and have found it difficult to secure a teaching post thus far. I have always thought of teaching English overseas (South Korea). And due to the huge supply of humanities teachers and the lack of demand for them, as well as other personal factors, I am genuinely considering teaching English overseas for 6 months or a year.
    Just wondering whether, as an NQT yet to have completed induction, I would be disadvantaged when applying for humanities jobs when I return.
    I have had enough of day to day supply too.
    Please advise
    PS – I have posted this in the other roles too so that I can a wider perspective – but please do not let this deter you from replying on this thread
     
  3. Do you mean English as in a TEFL teacher or English as in working in a International School?

    The latter would certainly be possible. You don't even have to be a qualified teacher to do a TEFL, however, being a TEFL teacher would not go towards any sort of induction.


    If you mean working as an English teacher, then working abroad IS possible (I am aware of a fellow NQT who is doing this), but as far as I'm aware, international schools generally like people to of had at least a couple of years teaching experience in the UK beforehand.


    I don't think it would be of any disadvantage to you were to come back to the UK in a few months/ years time, but am sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  4. Scooby_786

    Scooby_786 New commenter

    Thanks for your quick and succinct response.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Sorry for the ambiguity; it would be as a TEFL
    teacher. I know that this will not contribute towards NQT induction but I would
    like to pursue it regardless.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>My question is more focussed on securing a humanities
    teaching post in the UK when I get back. Would my TEFL experience and absence
    from teaching in a UK mainstream school for a while work against me?
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
     
  5. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    I have sent you a PM.
     
  6. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Gaining relevant experience abroad should not be an issue when applying for future work in the UK. However, you will find it difficult to apply for work when abroad.
    Your best option would be to apply for September start posts before going abroad or you will return an be in the same position as you are now but with most of your 16 month supply allowance used up.
    When you apply for posts after being abroad there will also be the hurdle of getting an enhanced CRB as they will need evidence that you were not convicted or cautioned during your spell out of the UK. You will need to research this issue before going and find out what documentation and certified translations you could get overseas before returning in order to smooth the clearance process.
    Many overseas schools/voluntary service etc reaquire people to sign up for a year at least. That would mean returning mid-academic year to the UK if you went in the next few months.
    If you are only considering overseas teaching as a better alternative to UK supply work, re-double your efforts to get longer stretches of temporary teaching in the UK. Contact the LA advisor for your specialism and ask to be kept informed about up-coming maternity leaves etc. I did all my Inuction on temporary placements (2 terms on daily paid supply) in two schools.
     
  7. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    No, jubilee. I beg to differ. Many headteachers in the UK do not consider international teaching experience to be "relevant" at all. For a start, many international schools do the PYP/IB and in many cases that is going to be a fat lot of use if you are applying for teaching posts at schools in the UK where they do the National Curriculum. In any case, some heads think that teaching in an international school is just a tax-free holiday in the sunshine. Of course you will be able to get a job in the UK if you teach Chemistry or Physics, but lesser mortals may not be so fortunate.
    Teaching delightful, hard-working and well-behaved students in the Far East is definitely <u>not</u> "relevant experience" for some inner-city comprehensive in the UK. Do you honestly think that many schools in the Middle East will teach their students about alchohol, drugs and sex education? Many children in the UK learn about other religions in their RE lessons, but most conservative Muslim parents will not want their children to learn about Buddhism. Loads of international schools are fee-paying and have owners, but most schools in the UK are not, although no doubt this might change with the present Conservative-led government.
    As for your suggestion that someone who is currently teaching in an international school should return to the UK, again I have to say is that this would not be at all sensible. What is so wonderful about Council Tax, rain and all of those traffic jams they will be having in London because of the flipping Olypics?
     
  8. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    My comment was based on the perspective of there being some relevant experience in teaching abroad and none from being an unemployed teacher in the UK. Experience abroad would look better on a CV than unemployment or random days of supply work here.
    If regular supply work is available here, that might be considered more relevant but many NQTs are not teaching their specialism on supply or are being employed as Cover Supervisors, not teachers.
     
  9. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    It was not my suggestion. The OP asked how it would be viewed when they eventually returned to the UK to apply for Induction posts.
     
  10. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    "Gaining relevant experience abroad should not be an issue when applying for future work in the UK." This is what you wrote, jubilee, and in many cases it is simply not true, for the reasons I have already given.
    Of course it might well be a good idea to go overseas if you really cannot get a job in the UK. At the moment I am teaching at a school in Doha and some of my younger colleagues from Scotland have said that they simply had to get a job overseas, as the job market in the UK as a whole is so bad and in Bonnie Scotland it is even worse.
     

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