1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

NQT/teacher to Family Support Worker?

Discussion in 'Career clinic' started by KTCMCR, Nov 11, 2016.

  1. KTCMCR

    KTCMCR New commenter

    Hi all,

    I'm currently in my final stages of teacher training (ICT & Computing) at a secondary in a challenging area. Before I started my training, I was a TA for challenging students and students with SEN. I loved what I did and I found the TA work extremely rewarding but it wasn't enough to pay the bills. I had my mind set on being a teacher since I was in high school myself and in January of this year I began my ITT.

    I love teaching, the majority of my students from both KS3/4 are making the expected progress and when I am in the class - I am happy. However, as soon as I am not teaching my mood changes and I am bored. I feel wasted when I am not teaching/helping students.

    My mentor says that my own resources are second to none and I recently scored a Good in the first official obs of 16/17.

    But unfortunately I still feel as though I am wasted.

    Through teaching, I have realised that I love working with children and most of all, I am able to get through to the students whom most teachers would deem challenging. I am great at building rapport with those types of students - the ones who have generally poor BfL, who come from a broken home, who are basically hard-work.

    I come from the same area where the school is located. I grew up down the road and - the school I am teaching in is the school I went to!

    I can relate to the students who are going through difficult situations. I can seek out hidden issues and I am good at bringing out the voice of those who would normally remain quiet. The most important thing I have noticed is - the students can identify with me.

    I report at least 3 times as many safeguarding issues than my colleagues. Students can confide in me and they have a level of trust in me that they don't even have with Family Support workers based at the school!

    I feel as though I am a good teacher, but I genuinely believe that I could be a better support worker.

    I'm just lost as to what to do. Would it be an injustice for me to carry on as a teacher when I could be helping the youth of an area branded 'deprived' by the media/authorities?

    The ideal person to give me advice would be someone who has made the transition between teacher and mentor/support worker. (Long shot ay)

    Thanks guys.
     
  2. blueskydreaming

    blueskydreaming Lead commenter

    Do you think you could arrange to shadow someone for a few days doing this job, to see if the job is really what you think it is?

    My friend used to do the family support worker role. I think it very much depends on the local council or whoever funds the role as to what the role entails and how it pans out (you mention doing this role actually in your school, so rather different to what my friend did). While she enjoyed working with the young people, she felt constrained in what she was able to achieve due to external factors/third parties. For example, when dealing with a school refuser, she could get on well with the child, but couldn't get the school to agree with the adjustments or whatever it was that the family wanted. She became disillusioned because she went into the role wanting to help young people, but ultimately did not feel that she was helping them. Also, she had various cases all at once, and didn't spend much time with each family/child - there was not the consistency that you have as a teacher, where you are helping to create a safe environment for the child every day when they are not at home (maybe different though if working in the school doing the role). Don't underestimate the importance of what you're doing right now as a teacher for your local community.
     
    grumpydogwoman likes this.
  3. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    Work in a PRU or a Special School as a teacher.
     
    blueskydreaming likes this.

Share This Page