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NQT Primary - monthly take-home pay

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by SarahTES, Mar 5, 2009.

  1. Hi everyone,
    I'm sorry to ask such a crude question, but can anyone tell me roughly how much money a Primary NQT would take home each month after deductions?
    I'm due to start a PGCE in September, but I have unexpectedly become a single Mum and I'm trying to work out if I can afford to keep the house going on just one teacher's income.
    Thanks very much.

     
  2. Hi everyone,
    I'm sorry to ask such a crude question, but can anyone tell me roughly how much money a Primary NQT would take home each month after deductions?
    I'm due to start a PGCE in September, but I have unexpectedly become a single Mum and I'm trying to work out if I can afford to keep the house going on just one teacher's income.
    Thanks very much.

     
  3. there is a salary calculator on this site and various other places.
    It will all depend on where you are in the country.
    google tesfaq for the best calculator as it will work out all the deductions and give you take home pay
     
  4. Im an 'average' NQT - Paying tax and pension out of my current pay, on M1, and working in nottingham so outside london area.
    My take home after those deductions is about £1200.
     
  5. YOY

    YOY

    Work out your take-home on tafkam's site, and then go to the entitledto website to see what help you may get in working tax credits. As a single parent you may get a lot more help than as part of a couple. Maintenance money from the child's non-resident parent if this is applicable in your situation (see the csa website for details) is NOT classed as income when calculating tax credits, housing benefits or council tax benefits. If you have childcare costs you need to do the sums to see if you're better claiming tax credits towards the costs (up to 70% paid, but means tested so you may not qualify or may get relatively little help) or using a salary sacrifice scheme through your employer to get up to £243 a month in childcare vouchers (taken off your gross pay so reducing your tax/NI liability - saves a basic rate tax payer around £800 per year). You can also use these sites to calculate what would happen money-wise of you worked part-time -you may be financially better off with less hours and less income, depending on various circumstances.
     
  6. YOY

    YOY

    As an example, a single parent over 30 working full time with a gross income of 21k, paying around 6% in pensions, one child in full-time nursery costing £150 per week would get in the region of £150 per week in child/working/childcare tax credits. With no childcare this would be around 50-ish, no childcare and working under 30 hours £20-ish... so you do need to work it outbased on your circumstances, but you'd pretty definitely get more than the £547 a year basic!
     

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