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NQT not done teaching overseas HELP

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by katherine_elliott, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. I left the UK after qualifying in 2009 with a PGCE in primary. I did a year supply and struggled to get a job, instead i moved to the middle east where i have been working for the past 2 years. Unfortunately the international school doesn't allow for us to our NQT year. I want to move on in the next year and was wondering if anyone had any advice, do i head back to the UK to try and do my NQT or do i move onto other international schools that don't need it?
    I really enjoy teaching overseas and am not 100% sure i want to come home to teach. What advice would you offer?
     
  2. I left the UK after qualifying in 2009 with a PGCE in primary. I did a year supply and struggled to get a job, instead i moved to the middle east where i have been working for the past 2 years. Unfortunately the international school doesn't allow for us to our NQT year. I want to move on in the next year and was wondering if anyone had any advice, do i head back to the UK to try and do my NQT or do i move onto other international schools that don't need it?
    I really enjoy teaching overseas and am not 100% sure i want to come home to teach. What advice would you offer?
     
  3. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    If you were to go back to the UK, then it seems to me that you would most probably have quite a few problems, katherine_elliott.
    Firstly, a lot of heads in the UK think that international teaching is just a tax-free holiday in the sun, so you will probably not be offered a job at all or else you will have to settle for something pretty rubbishy.
    Secondly, it is rather difficult attending interviews in the UK if you are actually in the Middle East!
    Thirdly, some schools in the UK might perhaps think that you are rather unreliable and unstable, as you did not do your NQT thing at the "right" time.
    Fourthly, you have been overseas for several years and so you have been out of the loop re. the latest educational developments / government initiatives / silly fads in the UK.
    Fifthly, there are so few teaching jobs in the UK, what is the point of even applying for one when sixty or seventy other teachers will also be applying?
    Sixthly, your international experience would be valuable and relevant, if you were to apply for another international job.
    Therefore, taking all of these things into account, I would say that "a change is as good as a rest" and you should apply for another international job in a year or two, but forget this nonsense about going back to the UK, unless you really like Council Tax, rain and unemployment.
    If you are going to stay in international schools, then of course you should also be thinking seriously about getting some PYP/IB experience. I never got round to this and now I am too old a hippopotamus to learn new tricks.
     
  4. Jeremyinspain

    Jeremyinspain Occasional commenter

    A different perspective...
    1. A lot of heads, yes. But not all. When my wife and I returned from our first session abroad, my wife had two interviews, The first went like the the fourth point of the above reply. 'You mean you've been out of the UK while the 'xyz strategy' came in (and went out again)? Oh my giddy aunt, how dreadful,' etc. etc.
    At the second interview, when told by my wife that she had been abroad for 2 years, the head replied, 'how interesting' and a long discussion followed about the types of children she'd worked with (60 nationalities) the languages they spoke and how the school catered for this etc, etc. After a long and interesting discussion, she had a job.
    Which head would you have wanted to work for?
    2. This is very true, so if you really do want to return to the UK, you'll have to plan your attack very carefully, being honest with heads about your circumstances, trying to get all your interviews 'clustered' into a holiday period so you're not flying home for 1 interview. (You'll also need a good CV and references). This won't be easy, especially from the mid east, This is one reason why the advice to move (to somewhere slightly nearer the UK, France, Spain etc for a while and then trying to return to the UK, might be sound advice. You might enjoy France, Spain etc and your problem might disappear anyway. BTW, is there a time period within which you have to do the NQT thingy???
    Also note, that some international schools will supervise the NQT year, so you might just have to stipulate on your application that you want this.
    3. Yes, they might, but some might see you as resourceful, brave, 'experienced' (in a different way'), slightly 'different' (in a good way), etc, etc. These are the qualities for you to 'sell' to anyone who values the, and some will.
    4. Very true. But see 1 above. Some heads might see this as an advantage if you haven't been ground down and become cynical by the endless changes and 're-inventing of the wheel' that has gone on in the UK. Again, a 'selling-point' for you to mark you out from the herd.
    5. Very true, and maybe the most important point. The '2 interviews' story took place in 1991. The teaching world was a very different place.
    6. Your international experience should also be valuable and relevant to any head in the UK who hasn't been ground into dust. Notice, I said 'should'.
    I also agree with the above advice that a 'change' to another international school might be your best option. But find one where you can complete your NQT requirements. A lot of doors will be closed to you (not just in the UK) if you let this 'expire' or whatever it does if you don't do it.
    I'm guessing that you're quite young. I'm amazed at how much has changed in education since I was 2 years out of my PGCE. (The year the Space Shuttle launched for the first time and BBC 'micros' first went into schools, look it up if you're that interested). My point is, you might need every qualification you can get you hands on over the next x+1 years of your career and your PGCE is 99% done. Do everything you can to keep it.
    And very good luck.
     
  5. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Some wise and very practical advice from Jeremyinspain.
    It really would be a good idea for the OP to get his or her NQT requirement "done and dusted", as more options would then be available. Yes, it does look as though the employment situation for teachers in the UK is not going to improve in the near future, but of course family reasons sometimes mean that one simply has to go back to Blighty.
     
  6. As from April the law is proposed to change with NQT's able to complete QTS in schools with BSO Inspection status - with the aid of a school advisor/partner/mentor - Buckinghamshire have put out some info on this which may be worth researching. Also there is a proposal for fast tracking teachers who have taught for several years. Hope this helps

     

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