1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

NQT/mum Needing advice about her own child

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by anon1008, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. Our child is an average learner and achieved all level 2A?s at the end of Y2 - so proud! Child was always so happy but now in a mixed Y3/4 class, with an NQT and 32 other children, including 4 with SEN and other very challenging and disruptive children, our child now constantly complains that lessons are boring, can't or wont explain what she has been doing during the day, and only goes to school to see friends. We feel the classroom set up hasn?t helped our child but we are realists and understand the budget situations and feel she would only encounter the same experience if we moved her to a different school.



    She is very quiet therefore rarely gets noticed for anything, however other Y3 children have made progress and are at least a level 3c and above. My child's attitude is heart braking for me and has set off alarm bells.


    Most recently during parents evening the CT explained that our child is a 2B in Number therefore we are gutted. Class teacher told us not to worry about the drop as this can happen and it?s not a cause for concern. This however does cause us great concern as we feel we could have accepted this weak explanation if it had been at the beginning of year 3 when settling in, etc, but not now coming to the end of Y3. Especially as my child actually went into Year two a 2C, therefore has only gained 1 sublevel in 2 full years, which we think is appalling.





    In the teacher?s words our child is lovely to teach and has many friends, as she has a very caring nature. At home our child knows every avoidance tactic in the book, which buttons to press to wind me up and wont do extra work with me, although does do spellings, reading and times tables daily and always has done, plus we all know how the pressure of trying to force a child can do more harm than good. As a result we are joining the band wagon and are looking for a tutor for the immediate future, our child accepts this but doesn't want others knowing.





    Can anyone advice if we are overreacting?
    Is this common, I know not gaining a sublevel during transition from KS1 to KS2 can be normal, but is it normal to have gone a full year in Y3 to gain no sub level but to only have dropped a sublevel?


    Most schools don?t use sublevels and I believe these are being abolished this year with a new level system being introduced, although in our case I don?t agree with this new system as this could have easily been covered up or not recognised at all until it was too late.





    Thank you in advance for your reply.
    From a KS1 teacher/mum.
     
  2. Our child is an average learner and achieved all level 2A?s at the end of Y2 - so proud! Child was always so happy but now in a mixed Y3/4 class, with an NQT and 32 other children, including 4 with SEN and other very challenging and disruptive children, our child now constantly complains that lessons are boring, can't or wont explain what she has been doing during the day, and only goes to school to see friends. We feel the classroom set up hasn?t helped our child but we are realists and understand the budget situations and feel she would only encounter the same experience if we moved her to a different school.



    She is very quiet therefore rarely gets noticed for anything, however other Y3 children have made progress and are at least a level 3c and above. My child's attitude is heart braking for me and has set off alarm bells.


    Most recently during parents evening the CT explained that our child is a 2B in Number therefore we are gutted. Class teacher told us not to worry about the drop as this can happen and it?s not a cause for concern. This however does cause us great concern as we feel we could have accepted this weak explanation if it had been at the beginning of year 3 when settling in, etc, but not now coming to the end of Y3. Especially as my child actually went into Year two a 2C, therefore has only gained 1 sublevel in 2 full years, which we think is appalling.





    In the teacher?s words our child is lovely to teach and has many friends, as she has a very caring nature. At home our child knows every avoidance tactic in the book, which buttons to press to wind me up and wont do extra work with me, although does do spellings, reading and times tables daily and always has done, plus we all know how the pressure of trying to force a child can do more harm than good. As a result we are joining the band wagon and are looking for a tutor for the immediate future, our child accepts this but doesn't want others knowing.





    Can anyone advice if we are overreacting?
    Is this common, I know not gaining a sublevel during transition from KS1 to KS2 can be normal, but is it normal to have gone a full year in Y3 to gain no sub level but to only have dropped a sublevel?


    Most schools don?t use sublevels and I believe these are being abolished this year with a new level system being introduced, although in our case I don?t agree with this new system as this could have easily been covered up or not recognised at all until it was too late.





    Thank you in advance for your reply.
    From a KS1 teacher/mum.
     
  3. To be honest it sounds as though the teaching methods in this class are not working for her and she has stopped being interested. Have you talked to the teacher/ phase leader about your concerns? Although a tutor could help her levels, she may not show what she has learnt in school if that is the root of the problem. Good luck [​IMG]
     
  4. PS. I don't think there is an acceptable excuse for a child going backwards!
     
  5. It is quite unusual for a child to go backwards. Sometimes it can be a case of different teachers interpreting the levels differently. In terms of helping at home, a set time for homework every day usually helps. Try not to leave homework until just before your child goes to bed or before they have had at least half an hours rest after school. Maybe you could play educational games with your child to gain interest, games are also a good way of 'warming up' the brain before starting written work. Children can often be reticent about letting their parents help them with school work so tutoring might be a good option for you, at least until your child's confidence and interest in school has increased. Please feel free to message me about game ideas. I really hope the school situation improves for your child.
     

Share This Page