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NQT First ever job in Reception class!! First day/week worries - any tips pls?!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by mickeygeegee, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. Hi everyone,
    I just completed my PGCE and got my first job this week in a lovely school and will be teaching the new Reception class from this September. This might sound silly, but I've never been in school in the first week of the autumn term so have no idea what it's like and what I should be doing!! I understand that this will be a very exciting and nervewracking time for the children and so want to get them into their routines etc as quickly as poss, but as far as teaching is concerned, do i begin on the first day, or will i be just letting them play and get used to the routines, the other children and me?!! Any advice would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks!
     
  2. Hi everyone,
    I just completed my PGCE and got my first job this week in a lovely school and will be teaching the new Reception class from this September. This might sound silly, but I've never been in school in the first week of the autumn term so have no idea what it's like and what I should be doing!! I understand that this will be a very exciting and nervewracking time for the children and so want to get them into their routines etc as quickly as poss, but as far as teaching is concerned, do i begin on the first day, or will i be just letting them play and get used to the routines, the other children and me?!! Any advice would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks!
     
  3. Oh my gosh, I am in exactly the same boat. I got offered the job today and I am sooooo happy it's untrue! I am asking around for any bits of advice my teacher friends who are / have been in Reception have so when I find out i'll post it in this thread.

    I've not had foundation teaching experience before - do you know of any books / websites that might help for planning etc?
     
  4. Hi Mickey and Buttercup!

    I'm also an NQT who will be teaching Reception in Sept...just thought id post to say i have just started a thread in the NQT forum for Reception teachers! Hopefully we can gather there and share our worries/concerns/ideas etc!

    Will your class be starting part-time in Sept? I'm not completely sure how everything will run at my school yet as i havent properly been into school yet! But i think i'm planning on the first week at least being mainly play. Lots of sitting down and playing with the children, getting to know them/their likes/dislikes etc...aswell as quite a few short circle time "getting to know you" games- so they can learn each others names etc!



     
  5. Fantastic! I was feeling very lonely in my NQT world and now feel i'm not alone. I also start as an NQT in a reception class in september. I'm not sure if this is a positive or a negative but i will be working partime (jobshare) with someone who has been at the school a while. Mmmmmm could be interesting !

    So what are your main concerns?

    Do you know anything about the NQT process?

    Caz
     
  6. Hi all NQuTees. I no longer work in YR and realise that a lot of things have changed over a short space of time. But children don't really change that much so for what it is worth here is my view of the settling in process.
    The first stage is to set up your room in a child friendly way. 'Look again through the child's eyes' an advisor once said to me. (We had advisors and not inspectors in those days).
    What do they need access to, what do you want to keep them away from? Then spend most of your summer preparing labels with pictures or symbols so that everything is coded when they first walk in through the door. I used to have areas, ie. art area, maths, quiet corner, books, listening post, carpet area..... but I think they are called workshops now. Once this is done you will start to feel in control as you will at least be able to put your hands on things quickly.
    All settings have slightly different induction routines but whatever arrangement you have you will need to spend the first week or so teaching the children the routines and expectations you have agreed (as a team). So you really need to have a routine to get them started on even if you change it as you go along based on experience. It is much better to start as you mean to go on so if there is a no running rule make that clear from the start and then enforce it totally until the children all get the message that this is non-negotiable. So you need to think through your environment and decide what rules you will need to make it safe and managable ie how many in the sand? how many toys out at one time? who puts them away when a new toy comes out? That sort of thing.
    The children have very high expectations of YR and feel that they are more grown up now and will do more grown up things so its ok to have high expectations of them and then they will rise to that level. If you treat them in too baby a way and do too much for them, like putting on all their coats and aprons (cause you just love doing it at the beginning) then they will let you but at the same time resent their own lack of progress. (if that makes sense). So expect more and you will usually get it.
    We used to play the find it game a lot in the first week or so. The children all sit on the mat and you ask them 'Who can find me a crayon?' then choose someone to go round the room and bring back a crayon. You can give them hot and cold clues if they are struggling or get another child to help. All eyes are watching so now everyone knows where the crayons are. Continue in this fashion sending them to different parts of the room. Or you can do it the other way round. Have various objects on the mat and ask the children 'Who can find where the duplo goes?'
    I always thought that those first few weeks were about getting to know the children and establishing good routines. This early 'training' (I know, an unpopular word now) in how to use a paint drying rack, or wash your hands properly and dry them, or hang up your coat/apron by the hook so that it doesn't fall straight back on the floor, will be a godsend as the year moves on and you don't have the time or energy for it. High expectations of all children at tidy up time will be a life saver!
    Then somehow the year takes off and it's all busy, busy, busy till next July!
    Hope some of the meaderings of an old woman are helpful to you. Enjoy, it is a wonderful time.
     
  7. Hey,

    I am also an NQT and will be in a reception class too. From what i have gathered, baseline assessments are what takes place first so you can see where your children are. I know my children are not full time for the first couple of weeks so in the afternoon we are doing home visits. I am exactly in the same boat, don't know what to do because on a PGCE course you don't experience this side of things until you are going through it. But i would get to know your children, carry out baseline assessments, rules, getting them to sit on the carpet nicely etc, and just get a routine going so they are settled when it comes to teaching x
     

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