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NQT - 60 applications, no interviews!

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by maddidarling, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. I wonder if anyone can offer a different perspective on my little issue. I qualified in 2010 after years of wanting to be a teacher. I passed everything well, had 2 interviews whilst training - but on both occasions lost out to male teachers. I was advised at this point by a practitioner that this is common in schools if there is a lack of male teachers - even if the female candidate is superior. I was also advised that, in my early 30's, my age makes me risky of disappearing on maternity. May I reiterate - professionals advised this!
    I have since made over 60 applications, taken numerous courses, learned another language and 2 musical instruments, worked in playschemes and supply taught daily, child minded most weeks. I contacted the GTCW (what does the £45 cover?) and they basically said in not so many words - poor you there aren't many jobs in Wales are there!!

    I have shown teacher friends my personal statement, head teachers, all of whom said it was ideal. I follow person specs to the letter, and always TRY to at least get some feedback on why I am not successful. Possibly 5% of schools actually reply.

    The rejection is palpable and affecting my self confidence. Im scared this is reflected in my teaching. I work with many teachers daily, and am often upset at the low standards they keep and I can't even get a job, not even a long term cover.

    I have been prescribed anti depressants but I know this isn't the problem. My heart is breaking from the daily rejections in whatever form.

    Can anyone help me? I don't want to leave the profession after all this work, but is it possible im not right for it?
    Ive also been told that my cv will go to the bottom of the pile if a.) Ive done lots of supply(!!!) or b.) the school have never met me!!
     
  2. I wonder if anyone can offer a different perspective on my little issue. I qualified in 2010 after years of wanting to be a teacher. I passed everything well, had 2 interviews whilst training - but on both occasions lost out to male teachers. I was advised at this point by a practitioner that this is common in schools if there is a lack of male teachers - even if the female candidate is superior. I was also advised that, in my early 30's, my age makes me risky of disappearing on maternity. May I reiterate - professionals advised this!
    I have since made over 60 applications, taken numerous courses, learned another language and 2 musical instruments, worked in playschemes and supply taught daily, child minded most weeks. I contacted the GTCW (what does the £45 cover?) and they basically said in not so many words - poor you there aren't many jobs in Wales are there!!

    I have shown teacher friends my personal statement, head teachers, all of whom said it was ideal. I follow person specs to the letter, and always TRY to at least get some feedback on why I am not successful. Possibly 5% of schools actually reply.

    The rejection is palpable and affecting my self confidence. Im scared this is reflected in my teaching. I work with many teachers daily, and am often upset at the low standards they keep and I can't even get a job, not even a long term cover.

    I have been prescribed anti depressants but I know this isn't the problem. My heart is breaking from the daily rejections in whatever form.

    Can anyone help me? I don't want to leave the profession after all this work, but is it possible im not right for it?
    Ive also been told that my cv will go to the bottom of the pile if a.) Ive done lots of supply(!!!) or b.) the school have never met me!!
     
  3. All I can say is, this is completely me. I am in exactly the same circumstance. All I can do is wait for rejections and wish I was a different person. :-(
     
  4. Hey! This is such a typical topic that I talk about on a regular basis. I qualified in 2011 and have been conducting supply on daily basis along with attending various courses, and constantly pplying for jobs. I have not had the opportunity to be called for an interview either and this has got me down too. My CV is jam packed with experience, my covering letter has been looked at by several teachers and schools I have supplied with and I am told tht it is great too.
    I'd actually say that it is not an uncommon thing to be going through and I will be watching this post to see if there is any advice given too.
    Hope you get to where you want to be soon.
    Good luck!
     
  5. 1) Really, REALLY check through your letter and REALLY think about what each school wants. Did I show my original letter to my mentors, other teachers and heads? YES! Did they all say it sounded fine? YES! Did I still have to COMPLETELY rewrite it before I started getting even interview offers? YES! What I mean is, just because it's fine for that one head, or friend or whoever, does not mean it's fine for another head!

    2) If possible at all considering moving. I'm now recloating, and not a small relocate just 10 minutes down the road, I mean proper relocate from one town to another which is a couple of hours away! Why? Because sadly in this work environment it's what you have to be prepared to do if possible. This does not mean you stop applying to the type of school you want to work in. Just cos I'm moving didn't mean I suddenly started applying to schools which had bad GCSE results and whatever else!

    3) Do't give up. You will eventually find a perm post. Just hold in there (and look at the advice above).
     
  6. The key piece of advice which I can give is to personalise and adapt your application every time. As above, each school wants something slightly different. You speak of your application/letter in the singular which makes me think that you aren't adapting it very much.
    Again, as SSS said, I would go back to the beginning and start over. You say that you've been given really positive feedback on yoru letter/application but, in the nicest possible way, it's not working. So you need to change something.
     
  7. What helped me get my NQT job was using quotes from my Placements at Uni. E.g. If one of the personal spec points was that you are, for example 'Reliable and Punctual' - I would use a direct quote from one of my placement observations/final report e.g. 'X is a reliable and punctual member of the team'. They liked this as it gave evidence and proof that I was a good candidate. You may already be doing this but just an idea!
     
  8. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I think the advice to relocate is sound. A little recent supply on an application from someone recently qualified is fine, but more than that rings alarm bells for some people. They assume you're not good enough for a permanent post or that you don't stick at anything. It may not be fair, but it is the way some people think. You need to look at the vacancies in your subject and consider moving to where they need you. I'm not an NQT but a few years ago, I moved my family over three hundred miles because I couldn't get a job. This meant selling a house, finding another, moving two children away from their school and the friends that they grew up with and starting again. It has been worth it. We have moved somewhere with more employment opportunities for all of us, not just me. It wasn't easy and it could have gone wrong, but I wanted to teach and that's what it took.
     
  9. I too found it so hard to get a job - not many jobs going in the area which didnt help! Many people I knew relocated and have seemed fine ever since, and have since moved back closer to home - maybe it was easier for them to get a job once they were already employed? Who knows? I ended up working as an LSA in a special school as a new challenge, and also because I hated supply. I ended up getting a teaching job, but thats only probably because I already had my foot in the door so to say...but if I hadnt have taken that chance I wouldnt have a job I love. It is hard, and I know how it felt to be rejected time after time, but remember, theres so many others in the same position. Stay positive, and fingers crossed the right thing will come along soon :)
     
  10. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    The job situation really does depend upon the local market. In some parts of the country there is intense competition for any teaching posts let alone an induction role. Moving may not always be an option you want to consider but may need to. The email alert on TES will give you feedback about the jobs in an area being advertised -in addition do check out the NQT pools as these are a good source of opportunities. In addition the majority of opportunities do crop up in summer term in a busy period between Easter and May so you need to be ready to respond to any adverts or application processes. Do get your application checked by someone else as it is easy for simple errors to get in the way. One application I recently received has misspelt teacher on the front page! Try and also see it from the recruiters viewpoint- what is it that makes you a strong candidate do you meet the needs of the post/school?
     
  11. Dear Maddidarling,
    I'm doing my PGCE training at the moment and I was given some advice that was a little off the wall but really helped, and although it took quite a few applications (and a few months!) before I got my perm job, I did get a lot of interviews. The advice I got that helped was this:
    1) Don't make your application too long. A good covering letter would be around half a page (one page max) - put yourself in the Head's shoes and don't bore. Same with CV - one side only.
    2) Make the covering letter more about the school than about you. Why do you want to work there? Answering that question says a lot about you. Eg 'I read in your advertisement that you have such-and-such specialist equipment. I think that's wonderful because...' In just a couple of sentences you're saying a lot about yourself but in a more unusual way, and it also shows that you've taken the time to find out about the department.
    3) Only mention things that make you stand out - leave out things like your reliability/punctuality etc, because things like that should be standard, nothing to show off about.
    I think supply is an amazing opportunity to visit lots of schools and get a broader, more national view of schools. Some of the most stuck-in-a-rut teachers are 'virgin' teachers who have only ever been in one school. Imagine how many different managing styles you've seen, and how many different departments and how many schemes of work and so on, not to mention all the different pupils you've met. What a strength that is - I think all prospective Heads should have a mandatory year in supply. Your supply experience is a massive flashing light on your CV so make sure you mention it in your letter early and convince them that it's a career strength (which it is).
    Finally, don't think that your gender has anything to do with your situation. Whether it's true or not, thoughts like that aren't constructive. Whatever was the reason for each individual rejection, just think forward about how you can be that amazing candidate that everyone wants. Also, hang in there till April/May when a lot more jobs will probably come in.
    Good luck Maddi,
    Mina
     
  12. maddidarling
    Don't give up. It took me a year of supply alongside volunteering and 10 interviews to get my first teaching post. I only stayed in this post a term and then volunteered in two schools before getting a teaching assistant job and finally a teaching job in the same school.
    I just wanted to give you hope as I like you applied for every job going and rewrote my supporting statement etc every time. It just took time for the perfect school to come along.
    Plus since I got the teaching job that I love people have told me how people who are now really high up in education in their county had to supply and do other jobs for over a year when they first qualified.
    Good luck and keep going it will happen eventually.
     
  13. Hiya,
    this may sound a little daft, but we were told on our PGCE that if we ever have upset our placement schoolsthe heads of these schools chould contact 'all other local schools' to ensure we do not get a job in the area. this was also said about if we were offered a job and hen we were to reject it! hopefully you DO NOT fall in any of the two categories!
     
  14. Your message is very helpful.
    I have applied for more than 10 jobs(lost counts now), including one was my first PGCE placement(i had a great report from the school.) I didn't get anything apart from "unfortunately, you are not shortlisted...." very painfully! I guess that I just need to keep trying.
     

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