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NPQH or MA?

Discussion in 'Professional development' started by Scrabble66, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. Any views please as to which is the best route to SMT (Asst or Dep Head role) - an MA in Educational Leadership or the NPQH? What is the perceived difference from an employer's perspective?
     
  2. Any views please as to which is the best route to SMT (Asst or Dep Head role) - an MA in Educational Leadership or the NPQH? What is the perceived difference from an employer's perspective?
     
  3. NPQH is aimed at existing Heads/Deputies/Senior Leaders whose "next post is likely to be Headship". It's no longer compulsory, but most schoolsadvertising for Heads still seem to list it as "essential" rather than "desirable".
    Further qualifications (MA or whatever) could useful if they help you to do your job more effectively, but it would not be sensible to rely on them to as a guaranteed route to a particular post.
    The best route to a senior post is to gain the teaching and leadership experience that will enable you to carry out those more senior roles on a day to day basis. At Primary level a common career path might be...
    Classroom teacher > Curricululum Co-ordinator (esp.Core subjects like Lit/Num) > Key Stage Manager (poss at same time as Curriculum Role, esp if in a small school) > Asst/Deputy > Head
    (In Secondary, I guess it might be via Second in Dept, Head of Dept route... or via Head of Year to gain experience of pastoral management).
    Moving sideways can help broaden experience and show different ways (not necessarily better/worse) or doing things.
    Moving schools (but not just for the sake of it) can also broaden experience and working with great role models, working in challenging schools etc. etc. will teach you a lot if you are willing to learn...
    Learning about curriculum development, school improvement, managing people, knowing yourself and what really matters to you, managing yourself, dealing with tricky pupils, dealing with tricky parents, dealing with tricky (insert pretty much anyone you like) are all things that might be covered on courses, but you NEED that practical experience of living it and doing it to put the theory into context... Real life people/schools don't always fit standard theories and, if you have no experience to fall back on, it can leave you completely out of your depth.
    Nothing wrong with qualifications, but they are a complement to experience, not a substitute...
    Good luck with whatever you choose to do.
     
    karolina likes this.
  4. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I agree with all that cathyd has said.
     
  5. Thanks - good advice. I am fully aware that letters after one's name are no substitute for living through experience and professional development inside school - this is more about choosing the most relevant course that will help towards mid term goals of securing an SMT position. My school is funding - want to make the most of their money and my time. Thanks again for helpful insights.
     

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