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Now all pupils with a score of <97 have to drop MFL!!!!!

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by addled13, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. addled13

    addled13 New commenter

    Apparently we now have no say at all regarding which pupils drop MFL after Y7 - it doesn't matter if they enjoy the subject, are above target and we are promoting literacy in the subject - if SMT say drop it, that's what counts! Someone please find me a window to jump out of, because there isn't much point staying on here any longer.
     
  2. addled13

    addled13 New commenter

    Apparently we now have no say at all regarding which pupils drop MFL after Y7 - it doesn't matter if they enjoy the subject, are above target and we are promoting literacy in the subject - if SMT say drop it, that's what counts! Someone please find me a window to jump out of, because there isn't much point staying on here any longer.
     
  3. templing

    templing Occasional commenter

    Sanity has gone out of the window a while ago in our "profession". That and control (more and more, we're neither trusted nor respected and our professional judgment is constantly questioned by people - SMT, parents, etc. - who are convinced they know better). There was a brilliant article the other day in The Independent I think it was, saying how millions of workers (including the so-called "professions") now have no job satisfaction simply because all control has been brutally taken out of their hands, everything is decided for them to the nth degree, leaving them feel like robots or puppets (except that robots are not accountable, teachers are!). And too often, this control is exerted by people who are clueless or not particularly well-intentioned.
     
  4. We're having the same (irrational) discussions.
    And then we are beaten up figuratively for not recruiting enough students to do GCSE .....
     
  5. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I've always been of the opinion that more pupils should be dropping MFL early in order to have more input in literacy and numeracy.
    I do favour them having one lesson per week in European studies, though, where they learn basic vocabulary and phrases in one MFL but spend most of the lesson learning baout the country nad the culture via English. That's an extra boost for literacy as well as giving them the MFL-lite that they can cope with and enjoy.
     
  6. kittylion

    kittylion Senior commenter

    This score of less than 97 - is that a CAT score?
     
  7. veverett

    veverett Occasional commenter

    Do parents/governors know about this? The pupils are legally entitled to take a language at KS4 if they want to. And at KS3 it's compulsory.
     
  8. I am unfortunately old enough to have experienced teaching such courses. Back in the 70s there was a CSE in European Studies. It was not uncommon for this to be taught in MFL depts. As a new teacher full of study about European institutions at uni I was quite enthusiastic. This enthusiasm lasted a couple of weeks. It was the Cinderella course, the one that those who failed at MFL did.
     
  9. Outrageous! As Veverett has said. a MFL is compulsory at KS3. How can your SMT say that anyone can drop it after Y7? And if you mean after Y9 - it is an entitlement in KS4, so if a student wants to take a language, then the SMT has no option but to provide it.
    OtC
     
  10. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Even when MFL was compulsory for all to age 16, certain pupils copuld be disapplied from the subject because their educational needs required greater input in SEN sessions.
    I hated it when an SEN pupil was taken out of one of the two MFL lessons per week and would have preferred tham to have been disapplied from MFL altogether, as they had no chance of making any progress or being anything but bewildered when they'd missed every other lesson.
    MFL is not a legal entitlement in KS4 either. There will be many pupils who would have liked to continue with MFL but couldn't because of a clash of Options choices. They have no legal recourse to insist that the school re-arrange the timetable to make it possible for them to do MFL and the other subject they chose first from the same list.
    Options are a bit like choice of school; you can state a preference but your first choice is not guaranteed. I've been in loads of schools a few weeks after Options choices where pupils gets told that they can't do one or more of their choices at KS4 because places are limited or even because they have a better chance of Grade C in another subject.
    The pity is that so many potentially able students are choosing not to take MFL, leading to mixed ability classes, where years ago there would have been enough (most pupils) taking the subject to allow for setting.
     
  11. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I did a week's observation at a Special School in 1998 and the teacher told me thta she had teenagers who knew their numbers to 20 in French but not in English. I suspect she was not comparing like with like, as it will have been their understanding of Number in English that was being assessed.
    In French, they were probably just reciting a list and no-one was too bothered about whether they had grasped meaning properly.
    I asked why they were studying MFL in the first place and was told it was compulsory. How could a Special school, with such multiply-challenged teenagers, not know that they could disapply them from MFL and spend the time improving their grasp of basic English and Maths and Skills For life such as basic cooking and cleaning, personal care, making a phone call, shopping ...
     
  12. Random175

    Random175 New commenter


    I asked why they were studying MFL in the first place and was told it was compulsory. How could a Special school, with such multiply-challenged teenagers, not know that they could disapply them from MFL and spend the time improving their grasp of basic English and Maths and Skills For life such as basic cooking and cleaning, personal care, making a phone call, shopping ...

    Many specialists in educating children with SEN take a different view and believe even children facing considerable barriers to learning will benefit from a rich curriculum. Foreign languages at word level is often well within the grasp of children with SEN. It is seen as important also that one shouldn't fill the curriculum for children with SEN with teaching to ensure 'a basic grasp of English and Maths'. It is often too disheartening and languages at word level is enjoyable and encourages children to concentrate, listen and contributes to building confidence. If children can work at sentence level it will contribute to overall literacy levels.
     
  13. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    It might be well within their grasp to memorise and repeat isolated vocabulary or short phrases but what possible use is it to them?
    Are some/many even aware that it is vocabulary from another language?
    Will they start using MFL vocabulary in otherwise English sentences, blurring their communication even further?
    Will they ever be in a position, work or travel-wise, where their MFL knowledge will be at all helpful?
     

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