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Novelist's corner

Discussion in 'Book club' started by In_You_Go_Jones, Jan 3, 2011.

  1. That should say 'hadn't READ Dubliners'.
     
  2. Burndenpark

    Burndenpark Star commenter

    Miss MISS MISS

    I think I know.



    (BTW- this is classic Gene post rubbish then try to bury it under a long copy & paste)
     
  3. Burndenpark, I can see you've got your hand up. There's no need to shout out.
    What do you think it is?
     
  4. Burndenpark

    Burndenpark Star commenter

    Miss, is it that Gene talks through his glans?
     
  5. lapinrose

    lapinrose Star commenter

    But Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iss, what about my Choklit cake recipe?
     
  6. Given that is work is execrable, its more likely to be his sphincter.
     
  7. Burndenpark

    Burndenpark Star commenter

    Could he really manage that miss? Isn't his head blocking that passage?
     
  8. Well spotted Burndenpark but remember to put your hand up next time.
    Excuse me for a moment, that odd caretaker is staring through the window again.
     
  9. Germaine Tilly Dworkin-Greer's appreciation was audacious and raised a very worthwhile comparison between THE MAN WHO THOUGHT HE HEARD JENNY LIND SING... and James Joyce's THE DEAD. But upon detailed analysis I have found it to be heavily plagiarised. I have reported her to the Head of English.
     
  10. Burndenpark

    Burndenpark Star commenter

    Dear sweet darling head of Engelish
    I think that that Germaine Tilly Dworkin-Greer copied her talking about the novel what I written.
    Yours
    Eugeneb O'Nanist
    [​IMG]
     
  11. <u>Another snippet:</u>
    Sometimes one reads a passage in literature that simply haunts one. Such is this passage from THE MAN WHO THOUGHT HE HEARD JENNY LIND SING... One finds oneself dwelling on the character and personality of the author. One has the urge to try and find out all about this author. One word for me is paramount in summing up this author's character. That word is INTEGRITY.
     

  12. Sometimes one reads a passage in literature that simply haunts one. Such is this passage from THE MAN WHO THOUGHT HE HEARD JENNY LIND SING... One finds oneself dwelling on the character and personality of the author. One has the urge to try and find out all about this author. One word for me is paramount in summing up this author's character. That word is INTEGRITY.
    Germaine Tilly Dworkin-Greer
     
  13. lapinrose

    lapinrose Star commenter

    TBH, this has become tedious, or boring.....................
     
  14. Burndenpark

    Burndenpark Star commenter

    Yes, but he gets kicked which is what he wants- you know the really annoying, unpopular kid in class who winds up everyone else till they get hit? Then they can smile since they think others feel sorry for them and that's as close as they will ever get to being accepted.
     
  15. lapinrose

    lapinrose Star commenter

    I did mean even more tedious or boring, one can't say 'boringer'!!
     
  16. If one finds a passage in literature such as the one below boring then major problems in the aesthetics appreciation/intellectual development area methinks.
    'It's a slow Saturday in mid-December. **** looks out through the darkening conservatory and snow clouds blanket Hillingdon. Snow falling like petals from the whitethorns of spring; snow drifting in oblique sheets over the Grand Union Canal at Uxbridge where sometimes on early summer morning jogs **** used to see the former boxer and now painter, the late Kevin Finnegan, at work at his easel. Snow. Everywhere. Snowing in finely granulated powder, in damp spongy flakes, in thin, feathery plumes, snowing from a leaden sky steadily, snowing fiercely, shaken out of grey-black clouds in white flocculent dustings, or dropping in long low lines, like white spears gliding down from the silent heavens. But always silently!'
     
  17. methinks.

    you don't.
     
  18. lapinrose

    lapinrose Star commenter

    He's still floccing at it.
     
  19. lapinrose

    lapinrose Star commenter

    This is excellent writing:

    I AM FOREVER walking upon these shores,

    Betwixt the sand and the foam,

    The high tide will erase my foot-prints,

    And the wind will blow away the foam.

    But the sea and the shore will remain

    Forever.




    <hr align="center" />


    Once I filled my hand with mist.

    Then I opened it and lo, the mist was a worm.

    And I closed and opened my hand again, and behold there was a bird.

    And again I closed and opened my hand, and in its hollow stood a man with a sad face, turned upward.

    And again I closed my hand, and when I opened it there was naught but mist.

    But I heard a song of exceeding sweetness.

     
  20. Well, you should find yourself a job then
    Kahlil Gibran. Give me Seamus Heaney or Bob Dylan any day.
     

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