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Not yet retired but advice please

Discussion in 'Retirement' started by lizziescat, Feb 19, 2010.

  1. lizziescat

    lizziescat Star commenter Forum guide

    Thanks TES this is the forum I need!!
    Although my current career aspiration is to retire and despite hating what the job has become and how it is implemented in my school I find the thought of not teaching after a full time 30+ year career daunting. I have 2-3 years to go before I retire and whilst I have done the easy bit of organising the financial side, the emotional and 'what am I going to do without 60+hour weeks' side is all very vague. I have images of me sitting on the sofa as a real couch potato drifting thorugh the days (a bit like school holidays really but on a permanent basis.)
    Any advice from retirees?
    Did you 'prepare' yourself in any way? How?
    What would you do differently?

     
  2. Mathsteach2

    Mathsteach2 Occasional commenter

    I too had a 30 year F/T career, (25 to 55 years old) but I resigned rather than retired, mainly because of change in location, but Iike you lizziescat, I was getting fed up with the nonsense. Not so much from the kids, but from management. I did not want to leave education, so I did a one year MEd hoping to get a job in teacher training. This did not work out so I then went into supply, and now private tuition, both of which were/are very enjoyable. I really took to supply. I was my own boss, and as long as I survived the day no-one complained. I could do what I liked, or simply do what the absent teacher wanted, in my own style, of course.
    Of course, if you want to get out of education altogether, then again this needs some thought, but we need others here to say what they did or are still doing. My own thread is an attempt to find out these things. I guess those who are into something different do not bother to visit the TES website!
     
  3. lizziescat

    lizziescat Star commenter Forum guide

    Interesting that you find supply to be ok. Seeing how supply get treated I have always had that down as an absolute no. TBH when I retire the money aspect shouldn't be a major issue (although extras for a better holiday etc would be welcome.) I am really hoping to find somethig which gives focus and enjoyment in 'work' .
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    There are so many things to do you will wonder how you ever had time to work, lizziescat.
     
    Xericist likes this.
  5. Hi Well i only work 2 days a week and thought after 22 years of full time teaching I would be climbing the walls but I am not. Firstly look at the courses offered by your local authority.Usually there are lots on offer and at good prices. sometimes your local theatres have lunch time events weekly and matinees. I go to a weekly lunchtime one. I also save up jobs for my days off or for rainy days such as bits of decorating or tidying out a cupboard. Lunch with retired friends, Walking in my local parks etc also fill up time. Again many councils have groups you can join to walk, or volunteer to help in country side projects. take up a hobby such as painting, crafting, yoga, swimming
    Hope this helps
     
  6. I retired in July 2007 after teaching since "way back in the last century" and as one of your other respondents implied you will find so much to fill your time - no need to worry about wearing out your couch or damaging your brain with daytime TV. I personally have taken up some voluntary "work" - there are so many options in the volunteer sector and you can find something that suits you. The reason I am still reading the TES site is not that I was persuaded to do a few hours teaching for the local Adult Education Centre.
    All the best for your retirement when you get there
     
  7. janehelen

    janehelen New commenter

    When retired teachers came into the school I worked in and said "I don't know how I ever had time to teach" I used to think poor, sad gits! However, there is much to do it you look for it.
    I am also one of those people who is glad to be away from the "initiatives" introduced under Thatcher and continued by Blair. I deplore the introduction of competition and pointless targets into what used to be a collaborative profession.
    Before I became a teacher I was very involved in my local community but had to stop that because of work pressures. So I have found plenty to occupy myself: getting the local council to mend roads; coaching someone to pass
    their numeracy test; writing letters for those who are not so
    confident; guerilla gardening to attract widelife back after building
    developments......... I also have the pleasure of getting to know my neighbours.
    I admit that I did sleep for about 14 hours a day for the first
    month but now don't have time to do the environmental voluntary work
    I thought I would do.
    As a teacher, you have so many skills to offer to others
    My advice - be open to suggestions - there is a vast world of voluntary work just waiting for your skills - and you don't have to go away during school holidays!
     
  8. You have loads of good advice already but here are my contributions
    1. Consider retiring at Christmas or Easter, rather than at the end of summer term. Why? Firstly, summer fades to autumn very quickly (you'll sleep through a good deal of it. But, if you're wise, spend your waking hours having a mega sort out and catch up on all Those Jobs That Don't Seem To Get Done When You Are Working Full Time). Then (secondly), the nights draw in and the winter seems to go on for ever and ever! If you retire at Christmas or Easter, the nights continue to draw out - hurrah!
    2. When people ask you what you do for a living, don't just say "I am retired". It's a real conversational cul-de-sac. Tell them you are a retired teacher and you will be amazed at the difference in response - including some job opportunities and some interesting networks.
    3. Google "U3A". (Other search engines are available...)
    Enjoy yourself - you have earned it!
     
  9. Re my last posting...do I mean 'the <u>days</u> draw out'? (No-one warns you about rapid brain addle! Hey ho!)
     
  10. Hi Lizziescat -
    I was/am worried about similar things - not so much filling time but filling some of it with a bit of a challenge. While I am still thinking about this I have decided to teach part time in my own school which will hopefully give me gradually more time with which to consider my options.
    I have just completed a year of 3 days a week which has been great, and I now hope to do even less next year. I am beginning to feel a little redundant, but do have some time to myself after many years, which I suppose is as it should be! I am trying to get to the point where I have a choice I am happy with in relation to life balance.
    If you become a couch potato I am sure it will only be whilst you recuperate and renew your energies, and then something will lead you to the right choice.. Enjoy!!
    By the way, I have heard other people say they enjoy supply - and it does become your choice when you do it..

     
    sally90 likes this.
  11. I retired in 2006 after 30+ years of teaching in Europe and Latin America . I was apprehensive at the idea of being a Senior citizen but luckily I became very involved in my local University for the Three Ages here in my little village in Piemonte , Italy as well as giving a good number of private math and English lessons .... I now have time to walk, read , knit , visit my eight grandchildren and I must add I am so happy with my new lifestyle ..... Being a lifelong learner is the secret to enjoying retirement.....
     
  12. Hi Lizziecat
    I've just read the other responses from retirees. It all looks very jolly indeed. I retired in September after 36 years teaching. Towards the end I worked every evening and through the weekends and holidays. I won a lifetime acheivement award in the National Teachers Awards 2008, but approaching 60 I was tired of having to continually compensate for a lack of commitment from my classes by putting on extra classes after school,and dreaming up extra stimulating work for the classroom, all the time urging the clock to tick forward to my retirement. Now six months into retirement I lead a very lonely life. My wife is younger than than me and will work for several more years. I refuse to succumb to daytime television, and spend most days pottering about doing nothing and increasingly contemplating my mortality. I talk to no-one in the day except the check-out girl in Tescos. Don't get me wrong I don't miss the conflict and pressure in school, but I miss the socialising with some of the nice kids and the staff more than I every thought I would.
    You want some advice? If you like teaching then keep it up a few days a week, and think clearly about what you want to do with all this wonderful leisure.
    I know I sound pathetic, but at least I know I have to start doing some stuff before i go crazy. I don't want to worry you or dampen your zest for retirement,but I thought my experience might present a more balanced view, and perhaps make you more prepared than i was.
    Good luck

    Grouchob


     
    tall tales likes this.
  13. Why not investigate One to One Tuition? This is now taking place all over the country at KS2 and 3. Each school has an allocation of children who can have 1 to 1 Tuition in Maths or English for 10 hours. You get paid at &pound;25 ph + 2 hours planning for each child. Some schools will let you do it during the school day but others only after school - or even at weekends if it suited everyone. If you enjoy teaching and working with children you will love it! I have 12 children in various schools - I try to have at least 2 consecutive sessions in each school. There is preparation of course but you mark with the child. No Parent's Evenings, displays, staff meetings, endless assessments etc etc. Try it - if it doesn't suit you you can stop after one set of sessions with no ties. Any qualified teacher can do it I think though I am Primary so don;t know so much about Secondary. Why not investigate it Grouchob?
    Good Luck
     
  14. Hi lynn14
    I retired a few months ago. Things are going OK but I am interested in the 1 to 1 tuition that you are doing. Sounds ideal for me. How did you get into it? I'm secondary trained but spent the last few years working in 6th. Form Colleges. I have been offered lots of work such as 6 months contract for maternity/long term sick cover but it has all been full time which does not suit my needs. I would really appreciate any help you can give me i.e. who to contact or any other advice that you have.
    Thanks
     
  15. I took early retirement through redundancy last summer after 37 years teaching in Primary, for the reasons that many people have said on this forum already. It was the best thing I have done! I registered for supply - and have done a bit! You control how much you want to do. I am looking forward to my third holiday next week. My advice is, look around you, decide what YOU want to do - you will now have the time!!! Just make sure the sums add up! Enjoy the experience.
     
  16. Do you not have a family?Do you not have any interests? is the sum total of you as an individual based on the fact that you are a teacher? Is that all you come down to in the end?
    You must re-evaluate your life , aspirations and do something outside teaching!!!
     
  17. Hi I'm retiring in the summer after 17 years at the same school. My circumstances are probably a bit different from many others as i remarried 7 years ago and feel we are still waitng to start our life together. We have 6 children between us, the youngest will be finishing school in the summer too!! we are hoping to move towards the coast to a property with some land. I want to grow more veg, have an orchard and keeps bees, ny husband, who is already part retired, wants to restore classic cars. He never seems to have enough time to do all he wants!!! but he does make dinner most days which is great after a busy day at school.
    One of the things we are most looking forward to is going on holiday when and where we want and not in the expensive school holidays. And having the time to get totally engrossed in something without being interupted. I also want to continue learning Spanish and finish a book keeping course i've not had the enegry to do recently.
    Take time to work out what you really want and don't be afraid to have a go at something even if eventually you move onto something else. This is when you will have most time and energy to take on new things. GOOD LUCK!

    I can't wait!
     
  18. Hi
    Have a look at the TDA website - there is lots of info and a form to register yourself. http://www.tda.gov.uk/teachers/onetoonetuition/onetoone.aspx
    These sites have interesting stuff too.
    http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/teachingandlearning/onetoone/
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8439947.stm
    Look at your local Education Authority website as well.
    I was lucky because the school where I worked was part of the 2 year Pilot so I started doing it from the outset. We had training days and the Authority set up a list of Tutors. I just did it in my own school for 2 years as I didn't want too much with class teaching as well but then decided to "retire" a couple of years early and concentrate on the Tutoring. I wrote to schools near me as well just to establish some contact as I wanted to minimise the travelling and have had some response to that. I would prefer to have it all in the school day but some schools don't want children withdrawn from lessons so I do a mix. I work some hours every day except Fridays which I keep free and do Supply then if it suits me.
    Hope that is enough to get you started !
     
  19. Hi runshaw
    Have a look at the TDA website - there is lots of info and a form to register yourself. http://www.tda.gov.uk/teachers/onetoonetuition/onetoone.aspx
    These sites have interesting stuff too.
    http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/teachingandlearning/onetoone/
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8439947.stm
    Look at your local Education Authority website as well.
    I was lucky because the school where I worked was part of the 2 year Pilot so I started doing it from the outset. We had training days and the Authority set up a list of Tutors. I just did it in my own school for 2 years as I didn't want too much with class teaching as well but then decided to "retire" a couple of years early and concentrate on the Tutoring. I wrote to schools near me as well just to establish some contact as I wanted to minimise the travelling and have had some response to that. I would prefer to have it all in the school day but some schools don't want children withdrawn from lessons so I do a mix. I work some hours every day except Fridays which I keep free and do Supply then if it suits me.
    Hope that is enough to get you started !
     
  20. this sounds really interesting - wonder if there are any schemes like this in Scotland? I don't think so but might be worth trying to set up something. I am 3 to 4 years off retiring and while a huge bit of me is looking forward to it I am a bit concerned - I don't think I'm so worried about what I will do, rather how can I afford to do what I would like to do!!
     

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