1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Not been paid!

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by deborahharris89, May 2, 2012.

  1. I started tutoring in mid-March, and most of my clients are through my adverts on websites.


    One of my first clients was the mother of a year 11 GCSE student, who wanted tuition during the Easter holidays whilst her son was home from boarding school. The mother is the CIO of a multinational media company. (you would recognise the name if I told you)


    I initially agreed to 8 days of 2 hours tuition, but after a successful first day I was contacted by the mother who asked if I could do 3 hours a day instead of 2, and for an extra 2 days (bank holidays). I also agreed to accept payment at the end of each week by bank transfer.


    After the first week of tuition I noticed that the payment had not been made. On emailing the mother she assured me that she had made the payment, but it was "stuck" in processing (yeah, right). It it however appear in my bank account the following day.


    The following week, the payment also did not arrive (surprise, surprise). I sent the mother another email, to which she did not reply. I sent an additional email the following week, including attached invoices for both weeks, showing clearly what had and had not been paid, and sent a hard copy to her home address. I received an email a couple of days later stating "I will pay your invoice..." 3 days later, still no payment. I am owed over £300.


    Obviously I have learnt the hard way from this experience. I was fairly naive to tutoring at the time, and after this experience would not accept a bank transfer from someone I did not know for such a large amount of money.


    One of the most annoying things about this, is as I have stated, the mother is a CIO, they live in a large house in a nice area, and the son attends boarding school. I have clients who live in much more modest homes, who always make sure they have money to pay me. Obviously I appreciate that she probably has larger outgoing expenses than many of the people I tutor, this is not an excuse for not paying me. She simply should not buy what she cannot afford.


    Anyway, the question I wanted to ask... How do you get your money out of rich, stingy people who do not pay their bills?
     
  2. I started tutoring in mid-March, and most of my clients are through my adverts on websites.


    One of my first clients was the mother of a year 11 GCSE student, who wanted tuition during the Easter holidays whilst her son was home from boarding school. The mother is the CIO of a multinational media company. (you would recognise the name if I told you)


    I initially agreed to 8 days of 2 hours tuition, but after a successful first day I was contacted by the mother who asked if I could do 3 hours a day instead of 2, and for an extra 2 days (bank holidays). I also agreed to accept payment at the end of each week by bank transfer.


    After the first week of tuition I noticed that the payment had not been made. On emailing the mother she assured me that she had made the payment, but it was "stuck" in processing (yeah, right). It it however appear in my bank account the following day.


    The following week, the payment also did not arrive (surprise, surprise). I sent the mother another email, to which she did not reply. I sent an additional email the following week, including attached invoices for both weeks, showing clearly what had and had not been paid, and sent a hard copy to her home address. I received an email a couple of days later stating "I will pay your invoice..." 3 days later, still no payment. I am owed over £300.


    Obviously I have learnt the hard way from this experience. I was fairly naive to tutoring at the time, and after this experience would not accept a bank transfer from someone I did not know for such a large amount of money.


    One of the most annoying things about this, is as I have stated, the mother is a CIO, they live in a large house in a nice area, and the son attends boarding school. I have clients who live in much more modest homes, who always make sure they have money to pay me. Obviously I appreciate that she probably has larger outgoing expenses than many of the people I tutor, this is not an excuse for not paying me. She simply should not buy what she cannot afford.


    Anyway, the question I wanted to ask... How do you get your money out of rich, stingy people who do not pay their bills?
     
  3. I sympathise. Maybe this tactic would be useful:
    Many years ago, I worked in the world of advertising, and was told this story by a supplier. A photographer did some work for a VERY large company for an ad campaign they were planning. The company didn't pay promptly. The photographer asked repeatedly for payment, but to no avail. In the end, the photographer went to the reception area, handed over a payment request, and sat and waited for the cheque. Whenever someone else came into Reception, he asked very loudly whether the Finance Office had the long overdue cheque ready and expressed his disappointment that such a well-known large company could be such poor payers. Needless to say, he was paid pretty quickly.
     
  4. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    You should never give your bank details to anyone! I generally take cash at the end of the session as it is easier. In the future explain to the client you cannot hand them bank details because of fraud reasons, if they want to pay by cheque then the monies will have to be cleared prior to the sessions. The only problem is they then have the option of canceling ***** nilly!
     
  5. DonutBoy99

    DonutBoy99 New commenter

    Small claims court- be sure to claim extra for the cost of making the claim. Plenty of help available online.
    DB.
     
  6. Georginalouise

    Georginalouise New commenter

    In my experience, the more money a client has, the more reluctant they are to pay. The rich have often got there because they have no scruples and have a habit of taking others for a bit of a ride. As well as tutoring I do a small amount of academic writing and one client, a very large NHS Trust took five months to pay my invoices, and only did so when I threatened court action. The amount of money was £1200, a drop in the ocean to them but a months money to me. For tutoring I take payment on a sessional basis at the end of the session or monthly in advance before the tuition starts. I would write a letter, recorded delivery, stating it is your intention to claim back the monies owed through the courts, and that you are sorry to have to take this route but you are left with no alternative. I bet she pays.
     
  7. operate on a cash-in-hand basis in the future. Get paid every time you go, and don't go again if you don't see any money.
     
  8. If you know where they live, go and visit them, knock on their door and ask what the problem is?
     
  9. Well, almost a month after payment was due, after multiple emails... I finally got paid!!! :D

    Except she deliberately paid me £5 less than what was owed (£380 instead of £385). I know she did it on purpose because she knows I'm not going to kick up a fuss over £5 after all the trouble I have gone to to get the money.

    Still annoying though.
     
  10. I'm so sorry this has happened to you. I am a private instrumental teacher and people always want more for less/nothing! It's simple though, pay-as-you-go up front or no tuition! I learnt the hard way :)
     

Share This Page