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Not a dilemma just extremely upset

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by Alice W., Mar 30, 2012.

  1. Alice W.

    Alice W. New commenter

    I was dismissed a while ago (for sickness absence) and was given 12 weeks notice. I was so distressed at the time that I never returned to the school. I taught there for nearly 25 years and officially finished today. No farewell, no cards, no best wishes, no thank you, no recognition of my past hard work and dedication. I feel so utterly sad and lost and don't know how to 'come to terms' with this. I just want to know what others think about it. Am I so wrong to expect some kind of acknowledgement? Even from colleagues who have also shown no recognition. I feel as though I never existed. It's almost impossible to bear.
     
  2. Alice W.

    Alice W. New commenter

    I was dismissed a while ago (for sickness absence) and was given 12 weeks notice. I was so distressed at the time that I never returned to the school. I taught there for nearly 25 years and officially finished today. No farewell, no cards, no best wishes, no thank you, no recognition of my past hard work and dedication. I feel so utterly sad and lost and don't know how to 'come to terms' with this. I just want to know what others think about it. Am I so wrong to expect some kind of acknowledgement? Even from colleagues who have also shown no recognition. I feel as though I never existed. It's almost impossible to bear.
     
  3. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Just that there are some callous people about. To be treated so disgustingly after a quarter of a century strikes me as proof that the school is bereft of any humanity. You are better off out of there. To hell with them.
     
  4. How awful! I actually welled up reading your post. I cannot believe people can be so unfeeling and vile! The profession is moving very quickly into a competative, business like environment full of jumped up little know it alls who don't think about how they can use someone's experience to the schools advantage. I am hearing about lots of schools where more experienced staff are being pushed to one side. I really feel for you but for your own sanity don't dwell on this. Just think about all those children whose lives you did touch who no doubt will tell their own children about their favourite teacher at school. Your legacy does live on, believe me. Take care x
     
  5. Alice W.

    Alice W. New commenter

    Thanks. I always wondered if it came to the crunch, what people thought of me. Now I know.
     
  6. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    But you know you are better than them. Good luck.
     
  7. Alice W.

    Alice W. New commenter

    Thank you, but now you've got me welling up (for the hundredth time this month!). I know what you're saying is true it's just so hard to reconcile that what I always thought of as a 'caring profession' just isn't any more.
     
  8. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    Alice
    I think you have been treated <u>disgracefully.</u> Leaders in schools are supposed to be role models for children and model kindness and compassion. How could people you have worked with for 25 years not have contacted you and not felt badly. I have been treated so kindly by some schools; once I worked for a school for only about 4 weeks on supply but they gave me some lovely flowers and a card when I finsished my short term contract. They did not have to do that, but it was so generous and spoke volumes about the kind of people they are.

    Maybe some of your former colleagues will read this post and be ashamed of themselves. The school leaders need a lesson on good manners. No wonder you are upset! You are not wrong to expect some recognition and at least a letter of thanks: that is the minimum.
    However, although you may never know fully the impact you had on your students, your legacy will live on in the students and what they learnt from you both in how to live life and the subject you taught. Each one of the students you helped proves you existed and I am sure they will be thinking of you. Keep that in mind - the students you helped to learn and be successful in their subject.
    Trust you feel a lot better soon.



     
  9. Alice W.

    Alice W. New commenter

    Thank you. Yes. Other people tell me this. Someone recently reminded me of what I used to be like (before teaching). It was good to think about the 'old' me and what I'm really like as a person. This made me realise that I had become someone valued for what I do rather than for who I am.
     
  10. frustum

    frustum Lead commenter

    It happened to a colleague of mine. He did get a letter from the DfE (or whatever it was at the time) due to his long service, but nothing from the school. Partly that was a matter of timing - his ill-health retirement came through just after a major turnover in the department, so the HoD was new and had never met him - possibly we should have done something before we all left, but it would have been awkward to do much before his future was settled.
     
  11. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Think of your own teachers from your school days. Of whom do you have fonder memories? Is it
    <ol>[*]the ones with silly and usually ungrammatical job titles who sat in offices and convinced themeselves they were important when they were nothing more than failed traffic wardens, or[*]the ones who inspired you in the classrooms and brought out your love of learning so that you wanted to do the same for others?</ol>I can tell you that when I think back to my 13 years as a pupil I cannot remember the names of those in category 1, but those in category 2 still mean a lot to me more than a third of a century later.
     
  12. Alice W.

    Alice W. New commenter

    Thank you for your kind words and to everyone else who has taken the time to respond. It means a lot to me.
     
  13. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    While it is rather cold of the school and your colleagues that no celebration of your time at the school took place, could it be due to the fact that you have not been there for 12 weeks ( forgive me if I have misunderstood this )? It does not excuse what happened, but it could just be that they - in their minds - had assumed that you had left 12 weeks ago.
     
  14. AlwaysAdaptable

    AlwaysAdaptable New commenter

    Hi Alice
    Just wanted to say that remember you taught some lovely children, there will be many who will remember you, I remember teachers who had a huge impact on my life. Some probably embarking on their own difficult careers, and things for them will get harder. Whether the people who you worked with remember you or not is not that important. The important thing is why you became a teacher. I became a teacher because I wanted to teach, give back what I got. To me it is the children who matter. In this day and age teaching is no longer about the children but about how good one is at jumping hoops, how good the data is on paper. Teachers get observed by people who haven't got a clue. The only thing they know is how to tick boxes.
    Remember you made a lot of difference to the lives of children who wanted to learn. Don't worry about meaningless gifts. Take care.

     
  15. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Allowed? It makes me angry just reading it.
     
  16. SundaeTrifle

    SundaeTrifle Occasional commenter

    Really sorry to hear you were treated like this, Alice. My husband was made redundant from a college after 15 years. The college closed his department and he still feels sad that there was no mention of his whole department in the principal's end of year speech. It is so sad that your former colleagues have treated you like this. I am sure you will keep many happy memories of the good and happy times.
     
  17. So sorry to hear how you feel. What has happened to our once caring and trusted profession? Sickness, stress and target setting rule whilst people are swept aside, I feel for the scores of stresed NQTs!
     
  18. Vampyria

    Vampyria New commenter

    Oh! Alice, I'm sooo very sorry to hear about this. However, please do not see this as a reflection on you! This just speaks volumes about the utterly thoughtless actions of those ex-colleagues of yours.
    Have you heard anything at any stage from your ex-HOD for instance?
    A similar ( though less serious ) thing happened an ex-colleague of mine once. She'd returned to help the Dept out in the last term and nobody said goodbye to her on the last day-! It did eventually dawn on one of them much later that day though and she did receive a text message.......
     
  19. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Good manners cost nothing, but are still too expensive for some of the talentless rubbish that we have in some senior management teams.
     
  20. poppythepuppy

    poppythepuppy New commenter

    Alice
    It made me sad reading your post, if this is how the people who run schools today treat staff then what hope is there for the pupils? I hope you can at least draw some strength from the fact that these people are too caught up in their own ambitions to even see what they have become. Good luck and enjoy the fact that you no longer have to be dragged down by these so called 'leaders'.
     

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