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non-words

Discussion in 'Primary' started by grape-juice, May 23, 2012.

  1. T'was I. Thanks for that, Eddie.

    Sorry about the lecture. Old habits become deeply ingrained with age and die, like people, very reluctantly.
     
  2. How do you know that, eddie?
     
  3. How do you know that, eddie?

    Because of my training, my experience as a teacher,headteacher and researcher as well as my commonsense and my general life experience and of course because it is entirely logical no matter which stupidities pseudo-intellectuals post as 'proof' of their beliefs. .
     
  4. So all those neuroscientists who are spending their time trying to establish just how the brain processes words when reading are really wasting their time because you (and thumbie) already know the answer.
    What a gift to science you are.
     
  5. A beautifully succinct and accurate explanation of the process.
    It is more difficult to exploit the brain's default search for sense when learning to read and write English because English spelling is so often patternless. Children's brains are constantly thrown into cognitive confusion by inconsistencies like 'man - many, on - once, supper - sugar, sure'...
    It means that whole word learning has to kick in sooner than in languages in which phonic decoding always enables u to access the correct pronunciation of words. That's what makes learning to read English much harder than other alphabetically written languages.
     
  6. It is more difficult to exploit the brain's default search for sense when learning to read and write English because English spelling is so often patternless. Children's brains are constantly thrown into cognitive confusion by inconsistencies like 'man - many, on - once, supper - sugar, sure'...
    Masha - that is undoubtedly and in my view indisputably true - but for historical and social reasons it is a status quo which is unlikely ever to change. We are stuck with it and we have to get on with it as it is and not as the beautifully regular, Finnish style orthography many of us would wish it to be.
    The fact that the majority of us seem to be able to master its complexities proves conclusively that it is a skill that can be mastered and only the appreciation of concepts and not the acquisition of skills is IQ dependent. It is our responsibility to find a way that the 20% who currently do not master it, do so. The only outstanding question is how that is achieved and in my view it will be achieved when the minds of those in teaching which are tighy closed by their fundamental belief that one-size-fits-all in teaching reading, are prised open.
    At the moment, for very what are in my view, very understandable reasons, the tide of fashion is with SP. When our consistently awful literacy data become impossible to ignore, even fools like Mr Gove will be obliged to see that the problem does not lie with failing teachers but with failing teaching strategies.


     

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