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Non compliance

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Shabas, Jan 5, 2011.

  1. Not sure if you can help. Need some inspiration for a Nursery child who refuses to answer the register (not major i know) and when asked to do something purposely refuses to do it initially and then will comply but very slowly eg was asked to move to her group and decided to crawl across the room rather than walk like everyone else.Everything is on her terms and it is becoming a battle of control. She can be very stubborn. We have a 'thinking spot' in the classroom but it does not seem to bother her that she gets put on it - therefore it's not working! My present tack is to try not to give her attention for it. However more recently she has become a little too touchy feely with the other children which i obviously can't ignore. Suggestions please! I was thinking about some sort of reward chart to try and focus on when she is doing the right thing?
     
  2. Not sure if you can help. Need some inspiration for a Nursery child who refuses to answer the register (not major i know) and when asked to do something purposely refuses to do it initially and then will comply but very slowly eg was asked to move to her group and decided to crawl across the room rather than walk like everyone else.Everything is on her terms and it is becoming a battle of control. She can be very stubborn. We have a 'thinking spot' in the classroom but it does not seem to bother her that she gets put on it - therefore it's not working! My present tack is to try not to give her attention for it. However more recently she has become a little too touchy feely with the other children which i obviously can't ignore. Suggestions please! I was thinking about some sort of reward chart to try and focus on when she is doing the right thing?
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    While there is undoubtedly a space in the behaviour armoury for positive reward strategies and their cousins, undoubtedly the best strategy to amend and guide behaviour is to focus on the punitive route. Children, particularly the younger ones (who are even less capable of rational, imaginative thought concerning outcomes and alternatives, consequences and responsibility), are far more motivated by the desire to avoid discomfort than they are to achieve some distant reward.
    So make sure that every time she doesn't do as she's told that something happens to show your displeasure; the simplest method, and the one least likely to offend the Geneva Convention, is usually separation and isolation; being made to play and learn alone for short periods until she realises that the best way to be involved with the group is to comply with your instructions. I would park the rewards, or at least defer them in favour of sanctions in order to make her realise that in your space there are rules; perhaps different ones than the ones she experiences at home...
    Good luck.
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  4. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    Shabas, there's a very similar problem in the "Refusing" thread to which I've answered. Have a look, see what you think
    https://community.tes.co.uk/forums/t/457117.aspx
     

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