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New Zealand - a warning

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by David Getling, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    Yes, its a great country, and the schools are generally far more pleasant to work in than those in the UK. However, the half-wits (and that's being generous) that run the New Zealand Teachers Council have decided to be a complete pain in the **** and make things much harder for everybody. But especially overseas teachers.

    Following worst practice in the UK they have decided to introduce an induction scheme. If my understanding of the details are correct, no matter how experienced an overseas teacher is they will have to start off with provisional registration, and therefore have to do the induction. I think the only exception to this is Australian teachers - which is a political, rather than rational decision.

    Schools have to devote resources to this, which means that while they would previously have been happy with provisional registration (from which it used to be very easy, to progress to full registration), many will now be much more inclined only to consider candidates with full registration.

    Mind you it's a great job protection scheme, so it wouldn't surprise me at all if this was done with the connivance and blessing of the various teachers unions.

    When one considers that NCEA exams are a walk in the park compared to A-levels and IB, to insist on an induction period for experienced overseas teachers is farcical.
     
  2. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    Yes, its a great country, and the schools are generally far more pleasant to work in than those in the UK. However, the half-wits (and that's being generous) that run the New Zealand Teachers Council have decided to be a complete pain in the **** and make things much harder for everybody. But especially overseas teachers.

    Following worst practice in the UK they have decided to introduce an induction scheme. If my understanding of the details are correct, no matter how experienced an overseas teacher is they will have to start off with provisional registration, and therefore have to do the induction. I think the only exception to this is Australian teachers - which is a political, rather than rational decision.

    Schools have to devote resources to this, which means that while they would previously have been happy with provisional registration (from which it used to be very easy, to progress to full registration), many will now be much more inclined only to consider candidates with full registration.

    Mind you it's a great job protection scheme, so it wouldn't surprise me at all if this was done with the connivance and blessing of the various teachers unions.

    When one considers that NCEA exams are a walk in the park compared to A-levels and IB, to insist on an induction period for experienced overseas teachers is farcical.
     
  3. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    Various Kiwi colleagues have all told me that there are two important factors re. teaching posts in NZ, namely (a) teaching is badly paid and (b) the competition for jobs is nonethless very fierce.
     
  4. BigFrankEM

    BigFrankEM Occasional commenter

    Yeh but it´s their country. So, they make up the rules. To suit themselves. Without motherEngland´s retaining a veto.
    Perverse, innit ?
     
  5. yasimum

    yasimum New commenter

    As if there are so many of us beating your doors down! After what I saw living in the Pacific, it is a very rational decision but I think you might find the tide is going the other way.
     
  6. msnessy

    msnessy New commenter

    I have to say it though, having taught in New Zealand, there were some shocking overseas trained teachers let in to teach in New Zealand, but by no means do all overseas trained teachers fall into that category. Particular shockers were those from nations who can't teach without worksheets. Australian teachers to be fair tend to be trained in similar ways to the kiwis and don't tend to have a worksheet reliance of other nations.

    Its been a while since I've taught in NZ but my understanding (which may be well out of date) was that all overseas teachers came in as provisional albeit with previous teaching experience acknowledged in the paycheque, so you could effectively be on the top of the pay scale (which is still worth *** all) but have a provisional registration status while you got on top of curriculum differences and cultural differences. And I know of several kiwis who were New Zealand trained who worked overseas and let their NZ registration slip who then had to do their provisional registration courses too, so its not just overseas trained teachers being singled out. One kiwi who was kiwi trained had the indignity of seeing her previous classroom in outback Australia held up as an example in a workshop. To say she was peeved to be sitting there & learning about her own initiatives and classroom is something of an understatement.

    But yes teachers council does tend to be well out of touch, that charges teachers exorbitent amounts of money for things like registration.
     
  7. On the point of Australian teachers, I suspect political reasons is not an accurate assumption. In most states of Australia teachers have to be registered with their state's teacher registration board. Part of this registration process requires a probation period and collection of evidence. Once this is achieved and mantained you have recipticol rights with other states and NZ.
    Please get off your high horse. Australian and NZ teachers in Britan are not recognised as qualified teachers until they have QTS not matter what their status. In Scotland, I was paid 10grand less than I would have if they recognised my VIT registration. I was a visitor and that is what was done in England it was a similar story and I was expected to go through the whole OTT process. Ultimately, there should reciprocol arrangements which acknowledge that if a teacher has meet similar standards in one country (or state) they are suitable to teach in another.
     

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