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New to headship and just wondering . . .?

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by jc1379, May 5, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I have recently accepted my first headship for September and I visited the school to catch up today. The office team wanted me to decide what to put on the new headed notepaper. The previous HT has her qualifications e.g. BA (Hons) P.G.Cert.Ed. My qualifications are BA (Hons), P.G.Cert.Ed, MEd and NPQH. Do I list them all or is there some kind of usual protocol whereby you just list you most recent qualifications. I assume you do not put on your NPQH?
    Thanks for anyone who is willing to take the time to answer or knows where I could find an answer. . .
     
  2. Hi,
    I have recently accepted my first headship for September and I visited the school to catch up today. The office team wanted me to decide what to put on the new headed notepaper. The previous HT has her qualifications e.g. BA (Hons) P.G.Cert.Ed. My qualifications are BA (Hons), P.G.Cert.Ed, MEd and NPQH. Do I list them all or is there some kind of usual protocol whereby you just list you most recent qualifications. I assume you do not put on your NPQH?
    Thanks for anyone who is willing to take the time to answer or knows where I could find an answer. . .
     
  3. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    It's up to you really. I have similar qualifications to you and I don't put any of them on the letterhead. Some heads do, some don't.
    The general consensus amongst my headteacher mates though is anyone who lists their Npqh is a bit of a wally.
     
  4. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    I think, if you wish to display any of your qualifications, that the highest most appropriate qualificaion will be adequate. In your case, the MEd.
    NPQH, in my view, is as much a 'qualification' as stating that you were once a Sixer in the Cub Scouts, 25m breaststroke or Cycling Proficiency.
     
  5. Me too. The previous HT here did put letters after his name but I hate it and don't put them. Feedback from parents says that they find it puts a wall up. I love the comment re NPQH!!
     
  6. Having done/been all of the above, and when I was 9 or so and being proud of all of them I am incensed that you have associated the NPQH with them.
    I'm sorry, only the Tufty Club should be linked with it, no effort required to gain, just a first class stamp!
    High Ho!
     
  7. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    I have a copy of the NPQH qualification right here.....
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Cor the NPQH is held in high regard then???!!
     
  9. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    By the NCSL and fools.
     
  10. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Tee hee hee! Nice one, CG!
     
  11. Another nice example of a 'put me down'.
    Some people have had to work hard to get their NPQH - I know some of the early awards were very easily given but the most recent rounds are far more strenuous. I know of several really good practitioners who were unable to proceed.So these aren't worthless bits of paper to everybody. My local authority is actively encouraging Headteachers to list their degree, NPQH and any Masters on their letterheads. Why do people have to be so caustic????? We wouldn't accept this criticism of our pupils - DON'T treat fellow Heads the same way!!!
     
  12. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    The local authority is 'actively encouraging heads to list...' - what's it to do with them? I've never heard of an LA believe it should make any comment on such matters.
    In fact, the earliest rounds of the NPQH (back in the 90s) were the most 'strenuous' - entrants had to be experienced deputy headteachers to get on the programme and it was very difficult to complete, with failure being a definite option.
    Then the NCSL decided it would let any old body on to it and experienced deupties who genuinely wanted to progress to headship found themselves - and I am not making this up - on the course with classroom teachers who had less than 3 years' teaching experience and no leadership responsibilities. All the NCSL was bothered about was numbers in and numbers out and it became impossible to fail unless you just didn't turn up.
    It might well be 'tougher' now - although the NCSL will still allow people who aren't even teachers on to the course; moreover, those heads who have completed it are almost unanimous in the opinion that it simply does not 'train' you to be a head.
     
  13. I don't understand why some people have a problem with others putting their hard-earned letters after their name. In secondary schools, particularly, we stress the importance of gaining qualifications and we celebrate achievement, and yet when it comes to staff wishing to show their achievements we think it's a bit 'flash' -??
    Maybe some of the objectors are not too keen to reveal their limited qualifications?
     
  14. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I'm afraid it's more that certain of them are not especially 'hard-earned'.
    And as for your second point - I've got 3 degrees, a PGCE and fellowship of a rather esteemed body that I'm entitled to stick after my name. I'm self-confident enough not to bother.
     
  15. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    The letters after my name ( and I could put plenty) would mean absolutely nothing to the majority of parents at my school. Some would think I was " showing off" I prefer them to judge me on the quality of the job I do not the number of hoops through which I've jumped.
    It goes without saying that heads have the right qualifications to do the job.
     
  16. It goes without saying that heads have the right qualifications to do the job.
    Every head? I know quite a few who have the bare minimum to become a teacher and nothing above or beyond that.
    And no, it's not showing off. It helps to inform the public that teachers (and esp senior teachers) are generally well-qualified. I have been asked several times by KS4 students if I have A-Levels!! And if students and parents don't know what all the letters stand for they can find out. Or maybe we could even enlighten them. The kids need to know as many will be going on to uni.
    It's obviously a personal thing, but people like me who choose to list their dgrees etc should not be derided. So there :)
     
  17. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    I think you'll find the derision was for NPQH, which I stand by wholeheartedly. It is the biggest pile of dross going and you only have to read this forum to see that it's churning out "graduates" who are ill prepared for headship.

    12% of my pupils parents are illiterate, the % who are addicts of some sort or other is huge. They don't give a flying fog what qualifications I've got, or whether I stick them after my name. If I attempted to explain what NPQH stood for I think they'd probably tell me where else I could stick my letters.
     
  18. I agree that with you highschooler - if you have worked hard then whatever you have earned and you want to put after your name is fine. My main point in commenting is that I think it is sad that people who are supposed to be inspiring leaders feel it is appropriate to deride people - full stop. As a Headteacher I would not allow that from any of my pupils and certainly would reprimand any of my staff that treated a fellow colleague the same way. As for the NPQH - you get out what you put in - some do very little and seem to get through - others put so much in and get a lot back - there is plenty of learning in the course if you want to do it.
     
  19. Each to their own I suppose - I think we should all be proud of our achievements and as teachers if we can't celebrate a good education who can? I think it is inspiring to pupils to show you are still learning and didn't stop after university. Having just completed my NPQH I can tell you it was no walk in the park and I'm proud to have achieved it. I'm not trying to put up barriers but show I'm always trying to better myself and work hard. I also think that given some people are unlikely to get the chance to study at uni or take such pathetic qualifications as NPQH we should make more of the opportunities we have made/been given. Luckily I work with like minded people.
     

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