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NEW SCHOOL NEW CLASSES NQT-FIRST LESSONS ADVICE!!

Discussion in 'English' started by molly0967, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    I am starting a new school next week for my NQT Year taking classes Year 7-11. Does anybody have any suggestions for good first lessons and advice how to approach first lessons ? I have not had any behaviour management issues in the past but this is a ' challenging' school and I want to get it right from the start so all advice appreciated. Thank you
     
  2. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    I am starting a new school next week for my NQT Year taking classes Year 7-11. Does anybody have any suggestions for good first lessons and advice how to approach first lessons ? I have not had any behaviour management issues in the past but this is a ' challenging' school and I want to get it right from the start so all advice appreciated. Thank you
     
  3. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    Why not start with normal lessons?
     
  4. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    I will be. By ' first lessons' I actually meant that very first lesson with a new class-establishing classroom rules etc. I was hoping for some advice about how to approach this-some advice has been ' don't smile until Christmas' other advice has been ' softly softly to get the class onside.'
     
  5. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    Trouble is, kids get lots of establishing-rules-lessons so they wash over them by lunchtime of day 1. Especially past Year 7. I don't subscribe to the 'don't smile 'til Christmas' idea but the theory is right - do not llet anything slip. If you set homework and don't get it, set a detention or whatever school policy says. Same for any misdemeanours in class. Deal with them straight away every time. Have seating plans and put students in different groups rather than letting them choose. If you let them have things their own way in the beginning, it's harder to sort them out a few weeks in. If classes behave well, you can ease off but don't let things slide. Try to alternate fun activities with the less engaging and establish the practices you want early on. For example, if you want working in silence at times or work in books presented in a particular way, start as you mean to go on.
     
  6. manc

    manc New commenter

    Sit them boy/girl, and then, as a sort of incentive, suggest that the seating arrangement MAY be subject to change IF you are thoroughly delighted with everyone's behaviour.
     
  7. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    Thank you-I have an all boys Year 10 class- I am particularly concerned about ' first impressions' with them and setting the tone for ther year ahead!!
     
  8. Hi I had an all boys year 10 class at the start of last year. I went in all buddy buddy, aren't I a nice teacher and they gave me hell. They were a top set so very smart, rather arrogant and all mates. The noise alone was horrendous.
    It took time but I eventually pulled it back. Got really firm, "this is the line you do not cross it" and eventually they came round.
    Now they are my favourite class and I adore every single one of them. I have genuinely missed them over the hols.
    So here is my advice.
    1. Get them in the class, in a seat you've allocated and get the lesson started.
    2. Crack on with the 1st lesson in the SoW. If you spend time setting ground rules they may well through it back in your face and my lot just took the p*ss
    3. Anyone puts a toe out of line use the school behaviour system. They will respect you for it, honestly.
    4. Do not give them an inch until you know you can trust them. My class always tried to push their luck, sitting where they liked, "forgetting" their work books etc. Be nice about it but make it clear that you are not going to yield.
    My boys actually told me that I was their favourite teacher before the hols stating "Your strict but your not a **** about it so we think your all right"
    This I am assure is high praise.
    Good luck hope it goes well xx
     
    CatLady101 likes this.
  9. thequillguy

    thequillguy New commenter

    One piece of advice I would give is to put a number on each desk. When they enter the door, give them their number. Have something for them to do as soon as they sit down.

    Can't stand watching a mass of kids waiting to be sat down at the back of a classroom.
     
  10. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    Thank you, that is really useful. I have seen another teacher I was observing try and ' befriend' an all boy class and it was a disaster !! Will go for witch approach then give a bit!!
     
  11. Yes it never goes well, the maths teacher who teaches the exact same class has a horrible time. Where as I've been used as an example of best practise. He keeps asking what my secret is. The secret is behave like a teacher, that is all they want you to be.
    It is easier to give a little than pull back a lot. Hope your first lesson goes well and the one after that, and the one after that lol x
     
  12. I think these have all been said but:

    -seating plan (whatever works best for you to learn their names quickly)
    -make an effort to learn their names this shows them you care but also makes discipline easier
    -firm but fair and always consistent dealing with behaviour
    -an activity to get on with as soon as they sit down
    -establish your space (don't stand at the front - move around the room)

    Good Luck!
     
  13. Why oh why has my formatting gone?
     
  14. manc

    manc New commenter

    My boys actually told me that I was their favourite teacher before the hols stating "Your strict but your not a **** about it so we think your all right"
    Blimey. I hope you weren't teaching punctuation to these high-achieving boys of yours.
     
  15. What is with people on this forum fixating on spelling and punctuation? This is a casual internet forum where people drop in and out to talk to each other and share ideas. I don't spend hours proof reading my posts. I say what I have to say and then I post.
    Surely we can see past a few ommisions in spelling and punctuation.
     
  16. manc

    manc New commenter

    You don't need to spend hours proofreading. Anyone with half a brain can see glaring errors. I don't buy that excuse.
     
  17. anon8315

    anon8315 Established commenter

    I don't normally bother but your/you're is quite a bad mistake for an English teacher to be honest.
    Hope the lessons went well, OP!
     
  18. jarndyce

    jarndyce Occasional commenter

    I thought she was being ironic, given that the boys she was describing would probably make exactly that mistake!
     

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