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New recipes for a new year....

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by musings85, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. Hi all
    I'm stuck in a bit of a rut cooking-wise and would love some new recipe ideas for relatively simple meals. I usually end up just boiling up some pasta and making a simple sauce or batch cooking chilli or stir frys and eating them every day of the week!
    I live alone and often end up throwing food away that has perished......which infuriates me as I hate waste and am watching the pennies!!
    Does anybody have any suggestions for something a little bit different that can make evening meals a little more exciting? (I'm also a massive fan of taking leftovers to work for lunch the next day!)
     
  2. Hi all
    I'm stuck in a bit of a rut cooking-wise and would love some new recipe ideas for relatively simple meals. I usually end up just boiling up some pasta and making a simple sauce or batch cooking chilli or stir frys and eating them every day of the week!
    I live alone and often end up throwing food away that has perished......which infuriates me as I hate waste and am watching the pennies!!
    Does anybody have any suggestions for something a little bit different that can make evening meals a little more exciting? (I'm also a massive fan of taking leftovers to work for lunch the next day!)
     
  3. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Tagine and cous-cous?
     
  4. Thanks for the suggestion lapinrose.....but at the risk of sounding very foolish....what's tagine? I thought it was a type of morrocan pot for cooking?
    Can you tell I'm new to all this?!
     
  5. Curries of all different shapes and tastes and sizes?

    I've just made a very simple one from Hugh Fearnley-W's new book, currently half price in Waterstones, chicken pieces, tinned tomatoes, tin coconut milk, garam masala and chilli flakes. I've added spinach and fresh coriander to give it a bit of colour. Made loads, so there's enough for two suppers and a lunch box.
     
  6. Curries are definitely something I want to try. I was bought a decent pestle and mortar for Christmas so really want to attempt making my own curry paste. It's just that a lot of the ingredients seem a bit daunting and it could take a long while to prepare. Anybody tried making their own curry paste?
     
  7. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    It <u>IS</u> a cooking pot, but it also the name given to the "casserole" (another pot word) cooked in it - usually slow cooked meat with fruit/veg and aromatic (not hot) spices.
     
  8. landaise

    landaise Occasional commenter

    I make thai curry pastes when I can find lemongrass ( every six months or so usually....)
    Just blend together lemongrass, ginger, garlic, chili, lime zest and juice with a good bunch of coriander and some fish sauce. It freezes beautifully, I freeze it in quantities to make a curry for us ( in ramekins, usually ) Add to browned chicken, stir fry and then add coconut milk. I frequently throw in some veg too: peppers, mangetout etc
    It really is easy and tastes so fresh and delicious, just wish I had some lemongrass now !
     
  9. Thank you Henriette - I'll look into some recipes.
     
  10. Sounds perfect - I didn't realise you could freeze it. Can you only get lemongrass at certain times of year?
     
  11. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Here's my lamb and apricot tagine recipe

    Lamb Tagine
    ________________________________________
    Ingredients:I call this a Tagine as I serve it in a traditional Moroccan Tagine, which is a dish with a conical lid. It is a combination of the Lebanese Mishmishya, from the arabic word for apricot, mishmish, with a tagine.
    Ingredients 1lb, 450g of cubed lamb.
    2 onions
    1 clove garlic, crushed
    1 teasp ground ginger
    2 teasp ground coriander
    1 teasp ground cinnamon
    salt and black pepper
    1 tablespoon oil
    4oz, 100g dried apricots
    2oz, 50g sultanas
    2oz, 50g flaked almonds
    Method:Grate 1 onion, mix with spices, salt and pepper and oil. Put meat in and stir round to cover it, leave in a cool place for 2-24 hours. Place all mixture in a saucepan with the other onion, sliced. Cover with water and bring to the boil, simmer for 2 hours with a lid on. Add the apricots and sultanas and simmer for another 20 mins, reduce the sauce by fast boiling if it is still thin and watery. Add the almonds and stir in. Taste and adjust seasoning.
    Serve with cous-cous, either plain or use one of the flavoured packets available in most supermarkets. I also like to top this with some chopped fresh parsley.
    A salad may be served e.g. Egyptian salad, 1 onion, 2 tomatoes, &frac14; cucumber, half a pepper, chopped parsley, croutons. Dice all ingredients and mix with lemon juice and olive oil, season with salt and pepper. Some chopped fresh mint may be added.
    SERVES: 4


     
  12. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    I posted a pile of curry recipes on the oxtail thread- have a try at those for a start. There's nothing difficult about making curries, and once you have a decent spice collection they can all be rustled up from the storecupboard. Any decent curry starts with making your own masala paste- see recipes. I don't use a pestle and mortar though- just a stick blender and a measuring jug!
     
  13. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    oh, and a coffee mill for grinding spices...I keep it for spices only.
     
  14. Thanks Si. I'm going to be brave and attempt one tonight. What do you recommend as the best cut of meat for a mildish and creamy curry? I was thinking chicken thighs as I'm on a budget!
     
  15. Yes - chicken thighs are ideal. Even better than chicken breasts, if you ask most of us [​IMG]
    How about making up some soup with those ingredients you normally throw away? You can bung anything in a soup and if you have some left over veg, it is well worth making up a basic veg soup and then freezing - you can then add new ingredients to the portions you defrost - bung in some left over meat, or add some new spices, or bulk out with pearl barley or rice or broken up spaghetti.
    If you are cooking pasta - cook a bit extra and then use that to make a nice pasta salad to take to work for lunch.
    Or make some individual sized pasta bakes and freeze (to take to work).
    Try making something like a shephards pie with lentils rather than mince, for a change.
    Or make your chilli and then add a flakey pastry lid.
    Or make up a big batch of stew and divide into four portions - I often do this. Eat one and then freeze the other 3 portions and then defrost as needed and add whatever takes your fancy - pastry lid, mash pot topping, dumplings or use to fill canneloni or pancakes.

     
  16. Some fantastic ideas there CQ, thanks very much. The pasta salad is strangely something I've never done before and I really like the idea of trying shepherd's pie with lentils instead of mince.
    I must confess the curry did not get made last night......spent too long chatting on the phone to a friend who received good news so in the end had a pot noodle.......I'm so ashamed! [​IMG]
    But the good cooking will start today!
    Thanks again for the great ideas everyone.
     

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