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New MFL Level Descriptors

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by mlapworth, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. mlapworth

    mlapworth Occasional commenter

    These don't exist officially, so you can make them up.
     
  2. mlapworth

    mlapworth Occasional commenter

    Here are the ones I made up:
    ---Billshut starts here---
    Level 2c
    is beginning to understand a range of spoken statements and questions that have been taught and can understand familiar written phrases. He can give short, simple answers to spoken questions, with support, and can copy out - usually correctly - short phrases that have been learnt in class.

    Level 2b
    can understand a range of spoken statements and questions that have been taught and can understand familiar written phrases. He can give short, simple answers to spoken questions and can copy out correctly short phrases that have been learnt in class.

    Level 2a
    can understand a range of spoken statements and questions that have been taught and can understand familiar written phrases. He can give short, simple answers to spoken questions and is beginning to take part in short conversations. He can copy out correctly short phrases that have been learnt in class and can produce some phrases from memory.

    Level 3c
    can understand parts of short spoken or recorded passages and can usually note the main points such as what someone likes or dislikes. He can usually understand short written texts about things he has learnt. He can take part in simple dialogues of 2 or 3 exchanges, with support, and can say what he likes or dislikes. He can also write 2 or 3 sentences, with support, about what he has learnt in class.

    Level 3b
    can understand short spoken or recorded passages and can note the main points such as what someone likes or dislikes. He can understand short written texts about things he has learnt. He can take part in simple dialogues of 2 or 3 exchanges, usually without support, and can say what he likes or dislikes. He can also write 2 or 3 sentences, often without support, about what he has learnt in class.

    Level 3a
    can understand short spoken or recorded passages and can note the main points and some details. He can understand short written texts about things he has learnt and can note main points and some details. He can take part in simple dialogues of 2 or 3 exchanges from memory and can say what he likes or dislikes. He can also write 2 or 3 sentences from memory about what he has learnt in class.

    Level 4c
    is beginning to understand longer spoken or recorded passages about things he has learnt in class and can note main points and details. He can usually understand short stories and texts and can note main points and some details. He can have a short conversation of 3 or 4 exchanges and can write a paragraph on some topics from memory. He is able to adapt a model text to write about himself, mostly accurately.

    Level 4b
    can understand longer spoken or recorded passages about things he has learnt in class and can note main points and details. He can understand short stories and texts and can note main points and some details. He can have a short conversation of 3 or 4 exchanges and can write a paragraph from memory. He is able to adapt a model text to write about himself.

    Level 4a
    can understand longer spoken or recorded passages about several topics and can note main points and details. He can understand short stories and a range of texts and can note main points and specific details. He can have a short conversation of 3 or 4 exchanges and can ask questions as well as giving opinions. He is able to write a paragraph from memory and can adapt a model text to write about himself. He is beginning to use previously learnt language in new contexts.

    Level 5c
    can understand extracts about several topics covering more than one tense. He can have a short conversation on a variety of topics and can ask questions as well as giving opinions. He is able to understand a range of written texts about present and past or future events and can note specific details. He can also write paragraphs without support and refer to present as well as past or future events. He is beginning to use previously learnt language in new contexts.

    Level 5b
    can understand extracts about several topics covering more than one tense. He can have a short conversation on a variety of topics and can ask questions as well as giving opinions. He is able to understand a range of written texts about present and past or future events and can note specific details. He can also write paragraphs on a range of topics without support and refer to present as well as past or future events. He is able to use previously learnt language in new contexts.

    Level 5a
    can understand extracts about several topics covering more than one tense. He can have a short conversation on a variety of topics and can ask questions as well as giving opinions. He is able to understand a range of written texts about present, past or future events and can note specific details. He can also write paragraphs on a variety of topics without support and refer to present as well as past or future events. He is able to use previously learnt language in new contexts.
    ---End of billshut---
    Those levels aren't just for speaking. They cover the lot. eg.
    Level 2c
    is beginning to understand a range of spoken statements and questions that have been taught [=listening] and can understand familiar written phrases [=reading]. He can give short, simple answers to spoken questions [=speaking], with support, and can copy out - usually correctly - short phrases that have been learnt in class [=writing].

    Our SLT loved them. We even used them as the main basis for report writing, following a brief bit about general behaviour, attitude etc.

    SLT said that our reports showed what an in depth knowledge we had of each child's ability and progress in each of the skills within our subject area.

    Utter bullsh!t, of course.
     
    juliana_thomas-smm likes this.
  3. spsmith45

    spsmith45 New commenter

  4. mlapworth

    mlapworth Occasional commenter

  5. mlapworth YOU ARE A STAR!THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP! THANK YOU!
     
  6. Obviously it's completely pointless trying to differentiate between the letters . eg how does your example of a 5a grade differ from a 5b ? Eveyone knows that it's all subjective and that the whole NC level system is BS..but our SMT still insist on our using it.
     
  7. MLAPWORTH Would you have the 1a,1b, 1c and 6a, 6b, 6c and the 7s by any chance. I think your level descriptors are brilliant! Really Really good. Exactly what I have been looking for. Thank you for saving me hours of work.
     
  8. mlapworth

    mlapworth Occasional commenter

    Sorry. Those are the only ones I did, as far as I can remember. I think level one was so basic it was pretty difficult to divide it up any more. Make your own up for the other levels. It's just a matter of taking statements from the 4 ATs and adding words such as "is beginning to", "sometimes", "usually", "always", etc and other adjectives and adverbs that imply + or - compliance with the original descriptor.
    I agree it's BS, and I know everyone jumps through the hoops because of their SLT. I never actually used these level descriptors in a thoughtful, I-think-young-Johnny-must-be-a-level-3c-in-speaking kind of way. Because I think that is a load of rubbish and lends these BS descriptors far more significance than they deserve.
    We came up with a percentage based assessment system where we could map percentage scores with predicted levels (based on CAT tests and KS2 SAT data) and compare actual scores achieved in tests with predicted test scores based on the CAT/SAT data. Sounds v. complicated, and is a bit tricky to explain, but was actually really easy to use.
     
  9. fionarh

    fionarh New commenter

    Thanks very much for sharing your level descriptors. Any chance of a look at your percentage based assessment system as I've been 'asked' to set up something similar.
    Many thanks
     
  10. minnie me

    minnie me Lead commenter

    Is anyone taking the APP approach and awarding high / secure / low judgements according to coverage - eg 9 0% 66 - 75 % 50 %?
     
  11. mlapworth

    mlapworth Occasional commenter

    The way it worked was that the school was given an end of KS3 predicted NC level for each student (in every subject) based on their KS2 SAT results. We then extrapolated from this an end of year 7 level and and end of year 8 level.
    We then used SIMS Assessment Manager (don't know if this is still in use, but I'm sure there's something similar) in the following way:
    All teachers gave the same end of unit assessments, with an agreed mark scheme, which produced a percentage score. Each teacher entered the end of unit score into assessment manager for each pupil (takes 5 mins per class).
    The data from assessment manager produced a correlation graph - don't know if that's what it's called, but basically a line graph mapping each students end of year target level against the average percentage scored for each person with that target level. (This was all done by the program, I just had to click a button).
    Using this graph it was easy to see that someone with an end of year target of, say, 3b, should be expected on average to get, say, 65% in a particular assessment. If s/he actually got 53%, you could see that that was the score you'd expect someone with a target of 2a to get, so we'd give them a 2a. If they got 78%, this was the score you'd expect someone with a target of 4c to get, so we gave them a 4c.
    The school had a policy of pupils tracking their own progress on grpahs in their school diaries. They had a graph in their diary for each subject, and at the beginning of each year they marked a line on the graph which represented their target / expected level for the end of that year. They plotted their assessment levels on this graph. If they were on target, their plotted levels would be on the line.
    So the levels they were given in each assessment were not the level they were actually working at, but the level they should be at by the end of the year if they perform as they are doing now.
    I know this is completely different from what a lot of people are doing in terms of asking students to compare their own progress against 'pupil-speak' sub-levels etc. But I think that to do that is a nonsense, as progression between the levels is not regular / linear.
    Remember that the ONLY time you are ever supposed to assign a NC level is AT THE END OF THE KEY STAGE. That is what they are intended for. Not as a progress trackers.
     
  12. mlapworth

    mlapworth Occasional commenter

    The trouble you go to... and the thanks you get... Tsk, tsk. [​IMG]
     
  13. spsmith45

    spsmith45 New commenter

    Many colleagues use percentage-based systems. You can also word sub-levels with phrasing such as "working towards...". I have never had to do this, thankfully.
     
  14. littlemissmo

    littlemissmo New commenter

    I might be being a bit thick, but I understood that the sub-levels referred to the number of times they had achieved that level. ie if they are just starting to work at a level 4, then they are a 4c and if they have been working consistently at that level then a 4a. I can't remember where I heard that but it's the way we have been working - can anyone enlighten me?
     
  15. mlapworth

    mlapworth Occasional commenter

    The sub-levels don't exist officially. Schools make them up. Some put a as the highest and c as the lowest. Others do the reverse. It's up to you how (or indeed whether) you use them. The statutory requirement is ONLY to report the nc level (NOT sub-level) achieved by each student at the end of the key stage.
     
  16. marilynphillips

    marilynphillips New commenter

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