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New Language Tutor - where do I start?

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by cremeegg, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. cremeegg

    cremeegg New commenter

    Hello all, I hope you're well and wouldn't mind listening to my question and offering your opinion and / or experiences.
    I am a young French teacher with experience of teaching large and small classes in a school, up to A-level - my smallest class is of three upper-sixth students.
    I met someone recently who asked what I did for a living, and I told them, and they said "oh I used to learn French years ago and would love to do it again".
    I said that I did not do private tuition and never had (my initial reason - though I did not say so - was that I would not feel comfortable charging money for something intangible, particularly something done by me - but neither would I want to do it for free!!!)
    This person seemed keen nevertheless - despite just meeting me - and wrote to me reiterating this. This person lives locally and has offered me 30 pounds per weekly lesson. (cue a "yippee" moment)
    Of course, I dearly would love 30 pounds per week, but I want to give this person excellent lessons in return. <u>But I have no idea where to start and how to do it.</u>
    The French is not an issue as I'm fairly good at it, and I know school wouldn't mind me borrowing a textbook or whatever so long as I returned it in equal condition at the end. I have loads of books of my own anyway that I could use.
    But I just don't know where to begin and how to do one on one. I used to teach music when I was a teenager for 5 pounds an hour but I just followed the tune a day book.
    Should I get the person to prepare an oral presentation of themselves to begin with to show me what they can remember?
    In a classroom I can use textbooks - but they are for kids. Or I would use powerpoint or smartboard, or songs, none of which are really useable in this situation.
    One resource that I probably could borrow and use is a mini whiteboard.... (A4 sized)
    What should I do? How do I plan coherent lessons for one person!?
    Thank you so much!
    (PS please don't worry about me just having met this person! I met them as I have become a client of their boss, and we are of the same gender, and they live locally.)
     
  2. cremeegg

    cremeegg New commenter

    Hello all, I hope you're well and wouldn't mind listening to my question and offering your opinion and / or experiences.
    I am a young French teacher with experience of teaching large and small classes in a school, up to A-level - my smallest class is of three upper-sixth students.
    I met someone recently who asked what I did for a living, and I told them, and they said "oh I used to learn French years ago and would love to do it again".
    I said that I did not do private tuition and never had (my initial reason - though I did not say so - was that I would not feel comfortable charging money for something intangible, particularly something done by me - but neither would I want to do it for free!!!)
    This person seemed keen nevertheless - despite just meeting me - and wrote to me reiterating this. This person lives locally and has offered me 30 pounds per weekly lesson. (cue a "yippee" moment)
    Of course, I dearly would love 30 pounds per week, but I want to give this person excellent lessons in return. <u>But I have no idea where to start and how to do it.</u>
    The French is not an issue as I'm fairly good at it, and I know school wouldn't mind me borrowing a textbook or whatever so long as I returned it in equal condition at the end. I have loads of books of my own anyway that I could use.
    But I just don't know where to begin and how to do one on one. I used to teach music when I was a teenager for 5 pounds an hour but I just followed the tune a day book.
    Should I get the person to prepare an oral presentation of themselves to begin with to show me what they can remember?
    In a classroom I can use textbooks - but they are for kids. Or I would use powerpoint or smartboard, or songs, none of which are really useable in this situation.
    One resource that I probably could borrow and use is a mini whiteboard.... (A4 sized)
    What should I do? How do I plan coherent lessons for one person!?
    Thank you so much!
    (PS please don't worry about me just having met this person! I met them as I have become a client of their boss, and we are of the same gender, and they live locally.)
     
  3. My first thought would be to find out what they want to do with their French... ie. do they want to take an exam or to reach exam standard even if they don't take the actual exam?, or to be able to talk confidently on holiday?, or to be able to read french literature? or to be able to communicate with french speaking family members or colleagues?
    Once you know the purpose of the lessons hopefully the way to teach it will become clearer. For exam preparation you presumably already know what to do. For lessons on conversational french, you might want to do something similar to Michel Thomas - if you are familiar with his teaching methods?
    I hope some of the above helps
    Liz

     

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