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New EU Work Regulations for Supply Teachers-

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by SUPER.SUPPLY, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. SUPER.SUPPLY

    SUPER.SUPPLY New commenter

    Hi to all,

    Does anyone know much more about this than I do? It is going to affect us all from October/November sometime.

    My agency has said that if supply agency teachers have a placement at a particular school for 12 weeks or more then those teachers MUST be paid to their pay scale. Again, those supply teachers who have reached the threshold and beyond could lose out to even getting regular work at schools because it will cost the agency more.


    My query is: When people have a career break then come back into teaching, do they come back at the pay scale they left on, I would have thought so?
     
  2. SUPER.SUPPLY

    SUPER.SUPPLY New commenter

    Hi to all,

    Does anyone know much more about this than I do? It is going to affect us all from October/November sometime.

    My agency has said that if supply agency teachers have a placement at a particular school for 12 weeks or more then those teachers MUST be paid to their pay scale. Again, those supply teachers who have reached the threshold and beyond could lose out to even getting regular work at schools because it will cost the agency more.


    My query is: When people have a career break then come back into teaching, do they come back at the pay scale they left on, I would have thought so?
     
  3. les25paul

    les25paul Lead commenter



    One of my agencies is proposing their teachers are put on a permanent contract at their fixed rate but with a guarenteed amount of hours and paid training. So in effect you are paid on the agency's pay scale since you are an employee of the agency.
    Not sure how this will work or if it will be allowed. What happens if you are with more then one agency or also work directly with schools , work from them might mean you will not be able to meet any guarenteed hours commitment, does this mean you will be in breach of contract? Also the flexibilty advantage of choosing to do supply has now been lost.
    Agencies might decide to change teachers in longer term placements every 12 weeks, this will be of no benefit to teachers. schools or students.
    In many cases (teaching one of the few exceptions) agency staff get higher pay then the regular staff and so there is a cost saving advantage for the employers in this case. In teaching the opposite is true (although at one time supply was better paid) so in theory the employee would gain. Of course thats going to happen, the whole proposal has been poorly thought out and will be detrimental to agency workers in all roles.
     
  4. Here we go again. Read the other threads on this subject to see that supply teachers will not benefit from this.
     
  5. SUPER.SUPPLY

    SUPER.SUPPLY New commenter

    Which threads would they be? I have been approached by a headteacher recently and was asked to send my cv to her. I'm angling to get on their books and be paid through county as i did TP there and got on well with her. This seems to be one way of getting around the problem. Agencies are having to put up the prices they charge schools this year. Well, mine are.
     
  6. A good, experienced, highly qualified supply teacher should be highly valued by all schools. The exploitation must stop and we should be winners in any dispute because we on the whole provide an excellent service despite all the myths, prejudice and utter lies spread about supply teachers!
     
  7. #

    I don't think supply teaching has ever been better paid than permanent contract. That myth has been around a while, and stems from those LEAs paying "day rate", 1/195 annual pay scale salary to the supply teacher for days worked, whilst the regular teacher is on annual pay, amounting to 1/365 annual pay per day including weekends and holidays. The supply teacher appears to be better paid, until you consider the pay stops with holidays. At best the supply is equal to the regular teacher on gaining 195 days work. (Except it is theoretically possible to work more than 195 days by working in LEAs with different holiday dates.)


    This expensiveness problem hits agency workers more than LEA directly employed. The LEA directly employed have been paid the full rate all along even on day-to-day supply, in "day rate" authorities, in fact with the option of Teachers Pensions as well.


    If LEAs can change their payment day-by-day or from 12 weeks long term to a 1/365 per day arrangement, the ruling will mean many directly employed supply teachers could be getting less, and schools will find supply cheaper, not more expensive
     
  8. I remember wising someone up who commented "We want more from you as you get paid more than us". Needless to say, I had an instant sense of humour failure and took them down a peg or six.
     
  9. SUPER.SUPPLY

    SUPER.SUPPLY New commenter

    I found this in the papers this morning.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/8743377/David-Cameron-moves-to-water-down-new-EU-job-laws.html
     

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