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Need your serious guidance & suggestions !

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by marshars, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. hi
    I want to do pgce mathematics and am currently a full time mom
    I have an overseas degree in Architecture
    Now there are two things that i want to you to guide me

    1. can i get admission in PGCE maths on my degree considering i have gcse and A's in engineering and maths subjects
    2. when do you get the state bursary, bcoz i dont have money to actually paymy fees so i would be relying on the training bursary

    i hope some one can guide met hrough

    regards
    mariah
     
  2. hi
    I want to do pgce mathematics and am currently a full time mom
    I have an overseas degree in Architecture
    Now there are two things that i want to you to guide me

    1. can i get admission in PGCE maths on my degree considering i have gcse and A's in engineering and maths subjects
    2. when do you get the state bursary, bcoz i dont have money to actually paymy fees so i would be relying on the training bursary

    i hope some one can guide met hrough

    regards
    mariah
     
  3. Hi Mariah
    Each PGCE provider will take your application on its merits and look at qualifications (and their equivalency), your experience and the potential for you to be a successful teacher. WIth the changing landscape of teaching things are often not as clear cut as 20 years ago in terms of who can do a PGCE. (You can also look at GTP if this doesnt work out)
    IIRC there is a bursary of £9000 for maths for next years students.
    On a slightIy different note, I may sound out of line but it is very hard to (i) read your post and (ii) see the content appealing to a provider.
    Im sure though you have just quickly jotted the post. [​IMG]

     
  4. adamcreen

    adamcreen Occasional commenter

    the bursary is delivered in three payments, one per term.

    you need to talk to your local teacher training institution and ask them whether they will admit you, before you start putting an application in.
     
  5. Hi Mariah,
    As far as I am aware, the 'standard' rule is that applicants are supposed to have at least 50% of their degree in the subject they want to teach (although training providers do have some flexibility to stretch the rules), so unless you did a lot of maths as part of your architecture degree, I would imagine you would probably struggle to find somewhere to accept you directly (as a point of comparison, I know people who did degrees in mechanical engineering, finance and the like who were told they had to do SKE, even though they had done quite a lot of maths as part of their course). However at the moment the Subject Knowledge Enhancement courses still seem to be running and if you've got Maths A level you could go on to one of these prior to doing a PGCE - the procedure is that you have to apply for a PGCE (and you can mention on the form that you're interested in doing the SKE first) and then if you are accepted by the training institute, one of the conditions of the offer is that you complete SKE first - generally this would be at the place where you would be doing the PGCE, but it is possible to complete SKE elsewhere. Some SKEs last for a full academic year, others are from January-June - it varies between different providers - some offer two start dates and will sign you up for the one that they perceive best meets your needs, whereas others only have one. You would need to check with the TDA what the funding situation with regards SKEs is though - up to now it has been funded, but I don't know what they have decided now that they are changing and/or cutting all the PGCE bursaries.
    With regards the bursary, my understanding (and I might be wrong or it might have changed recently) is that it is paid monthly so spread out throughout the course. However, at the moment students can apply for tuition fee loans so they don't have to pay the tuition fees up front (it is a loan though, so interest is charged on it) as well as various other grants and loans. The situation may be different though for non-British, non-EU nationals/citizens/residents/whatever - if this applies to you, you might need to check out whether there are different rules.
    The training providers are generally very helpful, so it might be worth contacting the ones you are interested in attending (I'm guessing that if you are a full-time mum you might be geographically restricted in terms of where you can apply to?) to discuss your individual circumstances.
     
  6. I have a degree in medical engineering and completed the PGCE 09/10. The actual amount of maths studied worked out about 22%. My subject knowledge was tested by some one to one questions at interview (mainly a-level questions) as well as a group dicussion on fractions\ decimal\ percent. Because they were satisfied by what they saw at interview they did not send me on the one year MEC but a 2 week booster course in the July before the course started.
    I would get in touch and have a chat with the universities you are interested in.
     
  7. You NEED zero % of your degree to be accepted onto a PGCE or GTP. Its simply a TDA guideline that is becoming less and less important to SOME providers.
    An enhancement course might be a requirement for some subjects although they are not held for all.
    Reading the PGCE/GTP forums alone highlight why having a degree should not be the reason teachers are taken onto such courses.
     
  8. True, and I probably phrased that badly. It's not an absolute (as if the training providers think you are a sufficiently good candidate they are happy to waive it and will offer places straight on the PGCE), however it is something to be aware of as a lot of providers do make the 50% claim on the admissions information they provide (e.g. York's website says:
    "The basic qualification is a degree with Mathematics forming at least 50% of the course. Examples include, amongst others, Mathematics and Education, Mathematics and Philosophy, some Natural Science degrees and some Engineering degrees.
    If you have an A-level in Mathematics and a degree, other than in a Mathematics-related field, then you may be considered a suitable candidate for a Mathematics Enhancement Course prior to commencing the PGCE. Information about Enhancement courses can be found on the TDA website at
    http://www.tda.gov.uk/Recruit/thetrainingprocess/pretrainingcourses/subjectenhancementextensioncourses.aspx
    ") especially if the GTTR forms are still insisting on the breakdown of degree content. I was once told that a lot of the time it comes down to whether the interviewer/decision makers deem that a candidate would able to show that they can meet the standard about sufficient subject knowledge within the already fairly crowded PGCE year or whether they would be better off doing something beforehand to show that they can meet it.
    It does seem to vary significantly between providers though - some seem very keen to put students on the SKE course first and others are less bothered about it - and a lot of it seems to come down to how the applicant comes across on the application form and in interview/interview day tasks.
     

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