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Need help teaching year 5 kids French please

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by thedancingqueen, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. Hi. I'm a final year trainee primary teacher. I'm starting block placement after easter and have volunteered to teach french to my year 5 placement class. I did French at A level and go on holiday to France every year. It's always been a lesson which I've been desperate to teach. I've had a few sessions about teaching languages, at university, covering some activities and good websites but I still feel like it's something I really need to read up on before I teach it. Are there any schemes of work which are followed by schools for teaching languages? Hasn't been mentioned on my course. My class don't learn French currently but they did last year and the teacher was keen on me picking this up again. Going to start off with the basics- like recapping how to say your name, age etc and I've been asked to cover things which would be useful if they were going to France on holiday, e.g. how to order food. I can speak French and so the thought of teaching French isn't something I find daunting but I'm not sure where to start in terms of planning my lessons. Can anyone give me some advice please? Also, if you have any useful websites/sources for resources which you're willing to share that would be brilliant and I'd of course be willing to dig my resource list out and contribute too. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Hi. I'm a final year trainee primary teacher. I'm starting block placement after easter and have volunteered to teach french to my year 5 placement class. I did French at A level and go on holiday to France every year. It's always been a lesson which I've been desperate to teach. I've had a few sessions about teaching languages, at university, covering some activities and good websites but I still feel like it's something I really need to read up on before I teach it. Are there any schemes of work which are followed by schools for teaching languages? Hasn't been mentioned on my course. My class don't learn French currently but they did last year and the teacher was keen on me picking this up again. Going to start off with the basics- like recapping how to say your name, age etc and I've been asked to cover things which would be useful if they were going to France on holiday, e.g. how to order food. I can speak French and so the thought of teaching French isn't something I find daunting but I'm not sure where to start in terms of planning my lessons. Can anyone give me some advice please? Also, if you have any useful websites/sources for resources which you're willing to share that would be brilliant and I'd of course be willing to dig my resource list out and contribute too. Thanks in advance.
     
  3. BrightonEarly

    BrightonEarly Occasional commenter

  4. BrightonEarly

    BrightonEarly Occasional commenter

    I haven't taught it myself, but have been producing resources to help primary colleagues.
     
  5. Hi dancingqueen,
    In terms of lesson planning, all the topics you have mentioned would really easily fit into the NC - check the section of it for references to include in your plans as you're still on placement. We use the Tout le Monde scheme of work, but its something the school subscribes to. We've also got some 'Singing French' books and other bits floating around.
    Your ideas sounds good - relevant, lots of recapping as they haven't studied the language this year.
    Decide what you'd like them to achieve by the end of the lesson, eg. to be able to use the target langauge to introduce myself and use lots of speaking activities to build their confidence. Obviously, it depends on you class, but I've found mine (many of whom have quite a strong local accent) take quite a while to get used to French ways of speaking. I don't think there's any harm in introducing the odd bit of very specific pronunciation advice - this is my 2nd year in Year 5 and each year different bits have cropped up, eg. emphasising un/une, 't' at end of words.
    Enjoy it - and let us know how it goes!
     
  6. Geekie

    Geekie New commenter

    This scheme of work has been designed with the non-specialist in mind: http://www.sunderlandschools.org/mfl-sunderland/resources-pr-fr-newsunderlandmaterials.htm and there is a series of podcasts to help with pronunciation and methodology: http://www.sunderlandschools.org/mfl-sunderland/resources-pr-fr-podcasts.htm
    There are also further resources here: http://www.sunderlandschools.org/mfl-sunderland/resources-pr-fr-resources.htm
    It's interesting that you say that your Y5s did French last year but not this year. It is still an entitlement despite all the Coalition's ditherings.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    Sorry if I'm teaching a grandmother to suck eggs, but basically decide on words you want them to know by the end of the lesson (or more usefully, phrases, and then build up to changing them around a little, a skill in itself). In MFL you generally start by listening to a word (AT1), repeating it (AT2), reading how it's written (AT3) and finally writing it down (AT4).You probably want to use a little target language as well, so I would teach them asseyez-vous, levez-vous, écoutez, etc.
    A useful thing to teach them is opinions "j'aime", "j'adore", "je déteste" etc to encourage them to develop their words into sentences, as well as the verbs avoir and être. There is also a lot of scope for games, little role plays in pairs, etc.
    Best of luck! An A-level is really good, your pupils are lucky!

     

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