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Need guidance on the NQT Statutory Guidelines...

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by HobanWashburne, Jan 31, 2011.


  1. Hi James,
    I have been on a course for behaviour management and have gained confidence to start dealing with the behaviour in my classroom however today after following the guidance I had a student removed for unnacceptable behaviour and it looks like they may be externally excluded.
    Now following this advice I was faced with having about ten students in detention at lunchtime for 15 minutes...now I know that this may only be a temporary thing but even then I was finding it difficult to manage this many children in detention. And this is just the first day of my new strategy and I have to teach worse classes in the days to come this week.
    Realistically in doing so this could be a lot of detentions but I must now crack down as I fear behaviour is becoming a major issue - which I need to face straight on. Now I teach three bottom set classes - all with children who if I mention their names in the staff room are known issues.
    I have struggled with some of these classes since day one and now I am looking for clarification of this part of the statutory guidelines as I do not wish to raise this unless I am correct in my assumption that this may apply to my situation:
    'must not present the NQT, on a day-to-day basis, with discipline problems that are unreasonably demanding;'
    It is rather vague... as discipline varies from school to school and as does the level of unacceptable behaviour.
    The behaviour situation I'm in is begginning to get me down, I'm losing sleep and becoming inaffective, and I'm also getting more disappointed with my situation as in my opinion I have been given classes others don't want to deal with - and I feel it is unfair that my timetable is not balanced - I teach a top set class 2 times a week and I love it! But the rest of my week is depressing...
     

  2. Hi James,
    I have been on a course for behaviour management and have gained confidence to start dealing with the behaviour in my classroom however today after following the guidance I had a student removed for unnacceptable behaviour and it looks like they may be externally excluded.
    Now following this advice I was faced with having about ten students in detention at lunchtime for 15 minutes...now I know that this may only be a temporary thing but even then I was finding it difficult to manage this many children in detention. And this is just the first day of my new strategy and I have to teach worse classes in the days to come this week.
    Realistically in doing so this could be a lot of detentions but I must now crack down as I fear behaviour is becoming a major issue - which I need to face straight on. Now I teach three bottom set classes - all with children who if I mention their names in the staff room are known issues.
    I have struggled with some of these classes since day one and now I am looking for clarification of this part of the statutory guidelines as I do not wish to raise this unless I am correct in my assumption that this may apply to my situation:
    'must not present the NQT, on a day-to-day basis, with discipline problems that are unreasonably demanding;'
    It is rather vague... as discipline varies from school to school and as does the level of unacceptable behaviour.
    The behaviour situation I'm in is begginning to get me down, I'm losing sleep and becoming inaffective, and I'm also getting more disappointed with my situation as in my opinion I have been given classes others don't want to deal with - and I feel it is unfair that my timetable is not balanced - I teach a top set class 2 times a week and I love it! But the rest of my week is depressing...
     
  3. As I'm sure they told you on the course behaviour managment is not solved in a day and what is needed is a conditioning of the pupils to not behave in the way they have been used to. That does take time and effort and perseverence.
    That said, from what you write it does sound like a very unbalanced bottom heavy timetable. Clearly if you are presented regularly witrh a range of 'notorious' pupils that could be conceived of as going against the statutory guidelines as you havwe discovered. Also, as you note - it is rather vague.
    So my adviuce would be to talk to the mentor also perhaps the head of department if appropriate. Take the approach of dealing with a skewed timetable - how does it compare to others in the department? What about those 'notorious individuals? Place it in the context of being unable to demonstrate progess in some standards because of their behaviour.
    Perhaps have the guidelines and go through them with the mentor/HOD with a view to seeing how the timetable is helping/hindering you during induction. Also point ouyt the positives, such as the top set that you really enjoy and how, when teaching these you feel that you can make progress and meet the standards.
    Clearly changing timetables can be difficult, and it needs to be donme carefully so that the pupils don't get the idea that the changes are because you 'can't control them''. If they see your point and agree to change the classes ask about the strategy for change that will be used to ensure you are not undermined. If they say, in effect, tough. Ask for a change - do this in writing and explain the reasons why - do it this way so that there is a record just in case later they try to bring up poor behaviour management as a reason for you not making satisfactory progress. If they do you already have the basis of an appeal against such a judgement. Make sure you quote the specific passage from the guidance in your request.
    You can also ask for an opportunity to observe one of the experienced staff teaching such groups so that you can gain experience and pick up strategies - if they are unwilling or fair no better then perhaps this can prompt a department wide discussion about resetting or a team strategy to solve the behaviour issues. It is ofetn the case that a team effort that is concerted will help solve such a problem rather than just dumping it on an individual.
    James

     
  4. Thanks for the advice, I think I will have a go at talking through the issues with my mentor. However I think that it may be difficult in organising a change without undermining me. I'll see what my mentor suggests regardless.
     
  5. Not undermining you can be achieved if the issues are seen to be tackled by the department as a whole. As a department you look at the groups and let the pupils know, each and every teacher, that the mix of pupils is wrong and that all teachers will be looking to effect changes in a range of teaching groups - that way everyone shares the 'change' blame in the eyes of the pupils and no one teacher should feel undermined. I did it a few times in my various departments (once for a NQT who struggled) it's the backing of the leadership and your colleagues that is important.
    James
     

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