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Nasuwt condemns the use of support staff.

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by Hazel Catkins, Apr 27, 2011.

  1. The question is, what are the NASUWT doing about it?
     
  2. I've already posted this under my summer strikes post but I''ll repeat it here as I think it refers to the same thing
    <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td class="post">the answer to the question is bascially nothing - they'll comment in the press and that's it....
    I mean they hardly went on strike to defend against cover supervisors did they...now both they and the NUT are bleating about use of unqualified staff in teaching...........................................................................................................................
    well hate to say it but I told them so....... This is the thin end of the wedge - they have accepted it even if did not sign up to it and now this will be the slippery slope for all teachers as I predicted....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    once government and management realise they can put unqualified people in and at rates far cheaper it will grow and eventually anyone can teach certificate or not - probably still require a degree but ultimately it will happen...... it's the end for us I'm afraid that's why amongst other things I'm doing my utmost to get out of it all and do something completely different
    </td></tr></table>
     
  3. madenglishgirl

    madenglishgirl New commenter

    Strange....I'm a CS (and p/t Instructor) and a member of the NASUWT. Funny how they don't 'agree' with my employment, but are willing to take my money and represent me!
     
  4. Pennyforyourthoughts

    Pennyforyourthoughts Occasional commenter

    There was NO MENTION of the use of Cover Supervisors in the press coverage................JUST that TAs were being used. Big cover up here???? I suspect there are more cover supervisors than TA's now and it could cause a rebellion by parents.
     
  5. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    If you are going to report what NASUWT debated, at least tell the full story. To do otherwise is misleading. They said the WRONGFUL use of support staff is an abuse. From the BBC article describing the resolution:
    "The resolution calls on the NASUWT's executive to ensure schools are
    allowed to use staff without qualified status only to cover short-term
    absences or allow teachers to plan and prepare for classes, or when all
    attempts to obtain a qualified teacher have failed."
    I agree with this proposition. Use of support staff is valid in certain circumstances.
     
  6. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    The real problem is that as far as secondary is concerned the NASUWT agreed to guidance that allows secondary Heads to define what constitutes a 'short term absence', rather than applying the so-called 'three day rule' that is clearly outlined for primary schools. This is based on the notion that absence of a single subject teacher in secondary is less disruptive (due to timetabling) than the absence of a whole class (ie all subjects) Primary teacher.

    Until that loophole is closed, secondary Heads are free to decide how long they wait before bringing in supply staff, and will continue to stretch the definition beyond the bounds of credibility.
     
  7. madenglishgirl

    madenglishgirl New commenter

    The way I see it is what supply teacher is going to be willing to go into a school to cover part of a teacher's timetable - e.g. I have taken on 10 hours of teaching this year (spread out over a fortnight) to cover an absent teacher's second subject. Their timetables had been re-jigged so that a qualified supply was brought in to cover their primary subject and I picked up the remains (which happens to be my specialism). Speaking to supply teacher friends, they would not even consider taking on a short term contract that was only for an hour here and an hour there as it means that they can't take full day bookings elsewhere.
    The way the school have arranged this makes perfect sense to me - the kids get continuity and the core subject has got a qualified, subject speacialist teacher teaching them.
     
  8. guinnesspuss

    guinnesspuss Star commenter

    And who is supposed to police this? There are schools where the rules are flouted and no-one says anything because;
    a) Who is there to tell? The union? Pretty toothless imo.
    b) Most teachers don't always know the full laws, so endless debate in the staffroom, but not much else.
    c) No-one wants to raise their heads above the parapet.
     
  9. If you support the use of support staff to cover classes I'm not quite sure why you are a supply teacher as the very use of them is the reason so many of us have had vastly reduced income since this policy was introduced -
    as supply teacher's i think the majority of us oppose the use of support staff in any teaching capacity and hold that the use of them in the first place is wrongful short or long term.
    It may not now be illegal but that is the fault of the previous government and the unions for kowtowing to them - that's why we are in this position now
     
  10. <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td class="post">If you support the use of support staff to cover classes I'm not quite sure why you are a supply teacher as the very use of them is the reason so many of us have had vastly reduced income since this policy was introduced -
    as supply teacher's i think the majority of us oppose the use of support staff in any teaching capacity and hold that the use of them in the first place is wrongful short or long term.
    It may not now be illegal but that is the fault of the previous government and the unions for kowtowing to them - that's why we are in this position now
    </td></tr></table>
     

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