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nappy changing policy for reception class

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by caramel, May 28, 2011.

  1. I have a little boy starting in september who preschool have told me needs to be changed between 3 and 5 times a day. He is not SEN (yet) although they are looking at behaviour. He wears a nappy but does not appear to recognise he has soiled and will sit in it until someone changes him. I have talked to the parents who are very concerned about the situation.
    I am fine with changing him but want to put a policy and procedure into place to protect my staff from any problems and want to make sure everyone involved with the little boy knows what to do and when.
    Does anyone have a nappy changing policy that I could look at or be able to point me in the direction of one. I can find lots for preschools on the web but would like something a little more specific to reception class if possible.
    Many thanks
     
  2. we have a continence policy which was provided by out LA via the continence advisor...maybe you have one of those you could contact... if not I'll have a look as I'm not sure I have an electronic copy...but I could get one
     
  3. Thank you Hammered. I have had a look and it has given me food for thought. I will be passing it on to my head teacher.
     
  4. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    You're missing the point - it's not that it's 'demeaning' (your word, not mine) at all, rather that teachers' terms and conditions - which were long fought for - specify duties concerned with teaching and learning. If you're not supposed to input data or put up displays yourself, you should not be changing a nappy. Moreover, what is the class doing whilst you're doing this?
    My major concern, however, is that this child either has a disability which has not been recognised and should be OR does not and the parents require immediate support from appropriate professionals to get the child toilet trained.
    Either way, simply accepting a situation and keeping a child in nappies who probably should not be is entirely wrong.
     
  5. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I love it when CAMHS discharge a child who is clearly not right.
    If there is no disability issue, if I were the head I really would be making the parents sort it - either come in and clean him up or exercise your right to move him. I know the latter would be shifting on the issue, but at some point the parents have to be responsible.
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The parents are very responsible and very supportive of the school
     
  7. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    In that case, they need to come in and clean him up. I'd also be battering back at CAMHS - the child needs help.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Unfortunately they both work but are more than happy to do so if available
    CAMHS say there isn't a problem
     
  9. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    So - and I'd want this in writing - CAMHS reckon soiling yourself and sitting in it, then smearing it all over yourself and the toilet is 'not a problem'?
    I speak as a head who had CAMHS discharge a child who then attempted suicide a fortnight later, so I know their tendency to fob things off.
    Honestly - I'd be calling them to child in need meetings repeatedly and asking them to tell me it was normal and acceptable for a child to be doing this.
    Obviously, it's your decision if you feel you've got to 'suck it up' and let it go on indefinitely, but if I were the head I would be challenging every social care, mental health and medical professional constantly on this one.
    NB I know the parents are supportive, etc - but I'm still not convinced this isn't a CP issue, because all my training tells me that soiling and smearing is a child abuse issue.
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    CAMHS have discharged the child and produced a full written report but are effectively refusing to accept further involvement which they say isn't needed. They also fail to attend most meetings unless they initiate them. Still lots of involvement from other agencies but no abuse suspected.
    It isn't my decision as it isn't a pupil in my school but I do know the class teacher doesn't know what to try next.
     
  11. Team work is the key!!!!!
    If a child needs changing, she/he needs changing. Within my setting who ever discovers that the child needs changing they do the task. This includes the class teacher.
     
  12. In the school I work in, everybody changes pads, including the class teachers. It's an SLD/PMLD school though so a bit different, admittedly.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    and you aren't in sole charge of 30 little people [​IMG]
     
  14. True-I think it helps a lot when you are working 1 to 1 in a class with only 6 students.
     
  15. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Poor child, poor teacher, poor parents. Soiling (rather than wetting) is such a pain to adults. I do think that many children at the reception age are still a bit immune to the smell as the nappy or accident stage is still within quite recent memory for many of them. There hopefully isn't anything long-term wrong with the child mentally or physically, or any abuse.
    I had difficulties toilet training my second child - I don't know why but she was scared of defecating anywhere other than in a nappy. So I just gave up and talked in a jolly way about it from time to time for a long time, looked at fun books about it, played with a pretend poo and a flushing potty etc etc. She chose some lovely pants when she was somewhere between three and four years old (I can't remember now) and decided for herself one day to dispense with the nappies and give it a go. No accidents, no probs ever again. I was lucky she did this prior to school age and at a pre-school that was pretty relaxed about the whole thing too. I do think that some parents thought I was being inadequate or ineffective but I just hung on to the thought that at some point she would not want to be in nappies of have accidents if she could possibly help it.
    I have a friend who took a different approach with a similarly tricky child and even now at 7 the child from time to time will revert to witholding, constipation for many days but with small amounts leaking frequently etc. Sorry about the details.
    I know it must be a right pain having this in your class, and the smell would make me want to vomit, but you know I'd rather this took place in nappies than in pants as at least you know that your classroom furniture etc is not getting soiled.
    Smearing behaviour is strange - but is it deliberate? Maybe the child is ineffective at cleaning himself / herself and is so terrified when he / she dirties his fingers that they just wipe it anywhere to get rid of it? Hope this is the case as smearing is odd, but maybe Ok in the strange world some children seem to live in for a while.
    Hope this child soon decides that enough is enough and gets on with the training himself / herself. It will be less socially acceptable with the others in the class as they all get older.
    I don't remember a child in nappies when I was at school; but it would not have been practical to go to school in a towelling nappy with a big safety pin. I do remember children having accidents of both varieties though, some individuals quite regularly, and I remember once having one myself - makes me blush even now - and I was toilet trained before 2 years old.


     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  17. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Poor little three-year-old scared of the toliet [he might fall down it! Where does his poo go?] might be excused for smearing a bit when in a panic about cleaning himself.
     
  18. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    We had a child like that - a lovely little boy - and his mother came in every morning until the problem was sorted out. He had been trained, btw, but was scared.
    If children haven't changed, then attitudes amongst adults certainly have. To a parent who announce that they don't have time to train their child, I would be tempted to reply that nor do I. To the laissez-faire parents who don't want to rush their children, I would say fine, keep them at home until they are ready. I say 'would' because I'm not sure I'd have the coruage to put it quite like that!
    Over the years I've supported many parents of serial wetters [usually girls] and, together, through vigilance and constant reminders, we've come out on top. For some reason, most of the soilers I've encountered have been boys. I don't mean occasional accidents. I'm not a physician or a child psychologist, so I don't know why this is true. ut all of these children, girls and boys, wetters and soilers, have been more or less trained. The idea of sending a medically normal child to school in pull-ons is appalling to me.
     
  19. Hettys

    Hettys New commenter

    I think it's more a case of what has become socially acceptable. When my daughter (who is 16 now) was a toddler it was generally expected that they were out of nappies during the day at around 2 years old, and most were. By the time my son was born, 5 years later, that age had changed to two and a half, and most were. Even the baby manuals/magazines were stating this as the expected age. Now you often see in these same manuals the age of 3 quoted as the expected age.
    So whilst some families will certainly take the easy/lazy option of not bothering to train, I think a lot of families don't think they are supposed to until this age and then of course you are dealing with a wilful 3 year old with other ideas!
     

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