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Naming and shaming teacher dinosaurs

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by nittygritty, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. Alex Wood, former HT and regular contributor to TESS, has a piece in the Herald today:

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/education/much-to-gain-from-improved-teaching-methods.17226134

    He does a Tony Blair. Remember: ?A day like today is not a day for soundbites, we can leave those at home, but I feel the hand of history upon our shoulder with respect to this, I really do.?

    Wood?s version is: ?..neither naming nor shaming ? will make sustainable improvements?.the small number of teacher dinosaurs who believe that once qualified, their professional learning is complete, need to change or go.?

    It gets worse: ??it offers professional teachers the opportunity to deliver their own improvements by working collectively. This fits neatly with the mind-set of Scotland's young teachers who are open to dialogue and self-evaluation.?

    So in Wood?s world, there are ?professional teachers? (young) and ?teacher dinosaurs? (old). This is ageist, deeply insulting to the majority of teachers who are not ?young?, closed-minded and lacking in evidence.
     
  2. Alex Wood, former HT and regular contributor to TESS, has a piece in the Herald today:

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/education/much-to-gain-from-improved-teaching-methods.17226134

    He does a Tony Blair. Remember: ?A day like today is not a day for soundbites, we can leave those at home, but I feel the hand of history upon our shoulder with respect to this, I really do.?

    Wood?s version is: ?..neither naming nor shaming ? will make sustainable improvements?.the small number of teacher dinosaurs who believe that once qualified, their professional learning is complete, need to change or go.?

    It gets worse: ??it offers professional teachers the opportunity to deliver their own improvements by working collectively. This fits neatly with the mind-set of Scotland's young teachers who are open to dialogue and self-evaluation.?

    So in Wood?s world, there are ?professional teachers? (young) and ?teacher dinosaurs? (old). This is ageist, deeply insulting to the majority of teachers who are not ?young?, closed-minded and lacking in evidence.
     
  3. Only if you want to interpret it that way. All he said is that it fits with how the younger teachers have been trained. This does not preclude that there are older teachers open to dialogue and self-evaluation.

    But he's right. In any other profession, anyone not taking part in professional development would be shown the door. Why should it be different with teachers?
     
  4. Undoubtedly the statement could have been worded better.

    Carrots are orange which means if it's not a carrot then it won't be orange?
     
  5. I am fed up reading about these super new methods that we should be using. It is sounding like a witchhunt where the only way to teach is the one prescribed by individuals who seek power. By saying theirs is the way ahead for all, the illusion created is that anyone who does not subscribe to their methods is wrong. Lets take group work. It works sometimes (depending on the expectations...), however I (yes just my own personal view) am not enamoured about the supposed benefits. Am I allowed to offer dissent against the wisdom that dominates? Peer assessment? Too many variables to suggest it is an efficacious use of time. Am I allowed to say that?
    I am a teacher it is my natural instinct to review what I do and find better ways to deliver lessons. CPD is not something which should be forced on teachers, we all should be doing it. Listening to people suggesting that this is a way to judge teachers irritates me. There are more obvious ways.
     
  6. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    "Above all it offers professional teachers the opportunity to deliver their own improvements by working collectively. This fits neatly with the mind-set of Scotland's young teachers who are open to dialogue and self-evaluation.

    The success of this approach requires two things. Firstly, the small number of teacher dinosaurs who believe that once qualified, their professional learning is complete, need to change or go."


    These statements clearly show explicit age-related prejudice. You don't have to infer that.
     
  7. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    "Carrots are orange which means if it's not a carrot then it won't be orange?"


    WRONG!


    Carrots are orange which means if it's not orange then it won't be a carrot!
     
  8. Exactly, which is why I put the question mark there.
    Sheesh.
    lol.
     
  9. No. Nor did you imply it.
     
  10. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Of course it is, but identified by who?
    I can easily identify areas of weakness in my own practise and I know exactly what I would like to learn to address that, but I haven't got a chance in hell of getting what I personally want.
    Yip.
     
  11. You "wood" appear to demonstrate the characteristics of a young teacher.
     
  12. Agree that "young" was the wrong word to use. He should have used "new". Problem solved.
    Other than that, what is wrong with getting rid of the dinosaurs? They do my nut in. [​IMG]
     
  13. Effinbankers

    Effinbankers Established commenter

    There are problems with CPD in schools
    Firsty having to write down, account for and justify everything we do so that PRD records can be filed in a drawer somewhere. We should be treated as professionals who know our strengths and weaknesses and requests for appropriate training should be met.
    Secondly most of the courses run by LAs are total rubbish. Proper CPD for teachers requires spending money which in the current climate isn't happening. Being forced to attend a twilight course run by some promotion keen individual for their own self interest doesn't equate to CPD in my book. There never seems to be money or time or cover available for £200 quid a day courses, but there always seems to be time and money for those wanting to do the headship stuff.
    If this re-accreditation scheme develops as I think it will it will; CPD and PRD will just be another big stick to hit us with
     
  14. If I make a point of telling you orange carrots are tender and tasty, what does it tell you about other carrots?
     
  15. It doesn't tell me that they are NOT tender and tasty!!
     
  16. I think you're the only one missing the implication.
     
  17. I'm not missing the implication. I've already acknowledged that it is there to be found by whoever WANTS to find it. The original poster made the implication then went on to call the IMPLICATION a disgrace, outrage etc as if it had been categorically said by the author of the article. I think this is pretty unfair to the author.
    If I can draw a basic analogy. If David Cameron were to say in public that he is proud of his country and that English people should be proud of what they've achieved over the last 100 years, would it be fair for someone to be outraged because the implication is that Scottish people have not achieved much? Should Germans be outraged? Should he be called racist because by specifying English, he is ignoring the achievements of all other countries? Or can we just assume that he is speaking about a specific example and that were he to be pressed further on the matter, we would find that he holds great respect for other countries too? (I know what the Daily Mail and their like would do.)
    I read the article, giving the author the benefit of the doubt.. Others obviously prefer to be outraged by it.
    The main thrust of the article was that there should be procedures put in place that are effective in dealing with teachers who do not see professional development as something that is part oft heir job. Isn't that more worth discussing rather than outrage at perceived implications on a single statement from that article?
     
  18. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    Actually I doubt if that is true. I would like to see some evidence of it. I think that for a Doctor or Lawyer to be e.g. struck off, their behaviour has to be pretty extreme.


    Anyway, the subtext of this article probably isn't really about CPD as such but rather CfE.
     
  19. Cheesy, none of us know if ther writer of the article meant what he said or if he made a mistake in communicating his views. Regardless, if we look at what he did say and assume his choice of worded was deliberate ( not too great an assumption, surely!) then the meaning is clear. You're looking for an ambiguity that simply isn't there.
     
  20. Read the last sentence of my last post.
     

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