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My PGCE Lesson/presentation idea - some advice please on my idea

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by emmieuk, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. Hi All,
    I have my PGCE interview soon and I have been asked to do a 5 minute presentation as if to a key stage 3 child. I must take a contemporary issue and explain how I would relate it to an RE lesson.

    I was thinking of explaining how
    ·
    Is this a good or a bad idea?
     
  2. Hi All,
    I have my PGCE interview soon and I have been asked to do a 5 minute presentation as if to a key stage 3 child. I must take a contemporary issue and explain how I would relate it to an RE lesson.

    I was thinking of explaining how
    ·
    Is this a good or a bad idea?
     
  3. grandelf

    grandelf New commenter


    I'd suggest swapping this for a card sorting activity or something similar. As this will show higher level thinking skills than just a poster.
    Will also enable you to talk about differentiation of the resources to suit pupils needs.
     
  4. Thanks grandelf - I know posters seem low level but I was going to mention it encouraging students to use their writing to persuade skills. Cross curricular etc
     
  5. grandelf

    grandelf New commenter

    Well go with what you feel happy with.

    Just make sure you are 100% on what the presentation is.

    Are they asking you to do a 5 minute presentation on what you would teach
    or are they asking you for a 5 minute snap shot of your lesson
    or AN Other.

    as this might change what you do.
     
  6. Thanks :)
    It states *select a contemporary issue and explain how you would relate it to an RE Lesson - this suggests to me that I have to explain what i would do rather than a snap shot but it contradicts itself at the beginning by saying
    "Your presentation should explain as if to a key stage 3 child"

    Your not going to explain to a key stage 3 child how you are relating the contermporary issue to the lesson.
    The other presentation choice was to select a religious artefact and explain its use and importance to the faith community.

    That one would suggest a snap shot lesson

    grrrrr so confused
     
  7. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    You will be ticking all the boxes if you look at the Panda in the Zoo issue, but I would have thought that in the current economic climate an issue of more relevance in the news would be the report last week (front page on the Express) that charities are providing food for staving people in Britain is more dramatic and closely linked to Christian teachings.

    I have prepared some info on this as a resource which you are welcome to adapt.

    You can also show the video of Edwina Curry refusing to accept that there are starving people in the UK and use red yellow and green cards (a great resource with many applications, if you've not made a set yet, I recommend them) to ask questions and stimulate discussion. (after presenting the information about people starving in England you can give statements and ask agree (green) disagree (red) not sure (yellow, for example.
     
  8. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    Sorry, I forgot the paragraphing.


    You will be ticking all the boxes if you look at the Panda in the Zoo issue, but I would have thought that in the current economic climate an issue of more relevance in the news would be the report last week (front page on the Express) that charities are providing food for staving people in Britain is more dramatic and closely linked to Christian teachings.


    I have prepared some info on this as a resource which you are welcome to adapt. You can also show the video of Edwina Curry refusing to accept that there are starving people in the UK

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15336931


    and use red yellow and green cards (a great resource with many applications, if you've not made a set yet, I recommend them) to ask questions and stimulate discussion. - after presenting the information about people starving in England you can give statements and ask agree (green) disagree (red) not sure (yellow, for example.


    One question you might ask is if we should care more for people starving in this country than those starving in other countries.


    Another question might be how we can educate our politicians who have almost all grown up in and lived in wealthy families and mostly gone to expensive private schools the kind of experience of life which they need if they are to understand the reality of life for people who are not so 'fortunate.'


    the discussion could widen to bring in the current famines world-wide.....

    you could then discuss responses. How do the students feel about this issue?
    Is there any local experience of poverty?

    What is their attitude towards 'poor people' - and this links with other current news - that attitudes have changed in recent years so many more people are not sympathetic towards those who are poor, viewing them as feckless, irresponsible, wasters. (Edwina Curry asks if these people waste money on the lottery or smoke the occasional cigarette etc.)
     
  9. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    The charity mentioned in the resources I've put up is Christian but this links to all religions, especially Islam and Sikhism which require sharing of income with those who are less fortunate.


    I'll add more later. Must go now.
     
  10. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter


    Thanks for the pm. Here is the gist of what I replied to you there as others may like to comment on and add to this -


    The reason I would choose the economic 'climate' rather than the panda story is not so much because of the central place that charity, fairness, sharing, love, compassion and oneness play within all the religions - even though that is really important. It is because I view RE as being very much about the life and experience of our students. If we can connect with their experience and make our subject matter relevant then it is much more valuable and spiritually nourishing than if it is just dealing with distant matters.


    With divorce peaking due to the recession and so much tension around due to redundancy and changes to benefits - which are making many people homeless as well as causing real hunger for thousands, many of the kids in our classrooms will be experiencing the impact of the recession. Its fall-out may well be something that is keeping some of them awake at night. So if we explore that (through articles such as 'starving Brits') we can engage with issues which are relevant and important in the lives of our students and link these to the insights and guidance that the different religions offer.


    It is shocking but not surprising that our society has become more intolerant in the past few years. That is something which would make a good basis for discussion. What shapes and influences people's views? Parents, gossip, TV news, Eastenders. 'the gutter press etc are some of the forces at work. RE lessons can be a good counter to these - encouraging reflection discussion and the growth of empathy.


    I like to have a section of the wall display 'RE in the News' where articles and pictures or cartoons about moral, social, spiritual and religious issues can be displayed. If you can use a corridor display then you often get groups of passing students reading this and hear them continuing with classroom discussions in the playground. Always remind them that RE is about life, it includes everyone and everything. You can't bottle it or get it from a text-book.


    If you can really connect with your students and engage them with the issues we are exploring then the whole atmosphere will change and they will fly.


    I was at a great workshop on Monday. Sue Philips, one of my favourite people, summarised her role-play based approach to teaching RE by urging us to find a way of presenting any topic in an experiential way. First they see, then they do, then they experience, then they talk about the experience and discuss the topic. Only then do they write about it. I would add reflect on the experience before talk on it - but that is being picky because it is clear that with Sue's activities, reflection was included in the experience.
     

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