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musical vocabulary

Discussion in 'Music' started by jonowen, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. jonowen

    jonowen Occasional commenter

    As a school we are putting together a vocabulary of key-words which are common across the curriculum and subject specific. Eg DEDUCE does not apply to music but DEMONSTRATE does. We have been given a list to add to and I'm wondering what other music teachers think. I've thought of CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM - to point out good in my friend's composition and suggest improvements, COMPLIMENT - to praise sincerely.
    Any other ideas very welcome (if you have the time, thanks!)
     
  2. jonowen

    jonowen Occasional commenter

    As a school we are putting together a vocabulary of key-words which are common across the curriculum and subject specific. Eg DEDUCE does not apply to music but DEMONSTRATE does. We have been given a list to add to and I'm wondering what other music teachers think. I've thought of CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM - to point out good in my friend's composition and suggest improvements, COMPLIMENT - to praise sincerely.
    Any other ideas very welcome (if you have the time, thanks!)
     
  3. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Really? I deduce that the first piece of music in the test is Baroque because I can hear a harpsichord playing with the orchestra.
    I have to say that unless I misunderstand the task, I can't see the point. You might analyse a piece of music, but you might also analyse a poem, or analyse the results of a chemistry experiment.
    And why is "constructive criticism" subject specific? It could apply to drama, ICT, or just about any subject.
    The only words that are really subject-specific are technical terms - and not even all of those (said he, phrasing his words carefully and trying not to recapitulate points made earlier).
     
  4. jonowen

    jonowen Occasional commenter

    my feelings exactly florian, but I am the messenger here (so to speak)
    (Ever dug a hole from which you try to escape - only to find the harder you try, the deeper you sink [​IMG] ?)
     
  5. midnightoil

    midnightoil New commenter

    Did somebody in an office with not enough to do think this up? You don't need to answer that.
    It never ceases to amaze me how educationalists love to make work for everybody else to do.
     
  6. If a student hears a choir and no instruments they might <u>deduce</u> it was an example of a capella music.
    As with music theory, I think vocab really has to tie in with the themes and the music featured in your schemes of work, otherwise just learning random words like that would have no sense. Students will not be motivated to learn them.
    So many words we use have subject specific meanings not found in dictionaries. So many words are similar that for each year of KS 3 a list of 30-40 words per theme, 3-4 themes per year that are subject specific is more than enough. So, maximum of 100 words per year.
    Vivaldi- string orchestra- Baroque- movement- concerto-...
    Whatever the theme you arrive quickly at 30 words.
    Better for students to learn a fewer number of really important words that have a real meaning in music than choose things like DEMONSTRATE which has no obvious unique musical quality for the students.
    Of the 400 or so Italian words in music- piano, forte etc., only a few are really important for students when they play.
     

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