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Music and Arts

Discussion in 'Music' started by michaela1981, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. Hi there, I m fully qualifide teacher in Music and Arts but without any luck found a job.
    I live in Suffolk near Ipswich for 5 years.
    If anyone know about some school looking for music teacher please let me know.

    I teaching clarinet, saxaphone, recorder, piano, singing, music theory and history of music.
    Thank you.
    Michaela

     
  2. Hi there, I m fully qualifide teacher in Music and Arts but without any luck found a job.
    I live in Suffolk near Ipswich for 5 years.
    If anyone know about some school looking for music teacher please let me know.

    I teaching clarinet, saxaphone, recorder, piano, singing, music theory and history of music.
    Thank you.
    Michaela

     
  3. v12

    v12

    Dear Michaela,
    Not wishing to sound like an awful pedant, but a clear lack of grammar, poor spelling and an obvious neglect of your having proof-read any CV or letter would be one reason that any potential employer might overlook your application for a job - especially as that job might include frequent report writing as one of its duties.
    Sort the written English out and you will stand a much better chance - even in deepest Suffolk!
    Good luck!
     

  4. Hi, I pass GCSE in English. I don’t think it’s my CV or my grammar.
    I went for interview and I been told I m overqualified.
    Bit confuse. Maybe it’s something else .
     
  5. v12

    v12

    Ahh. [nodding sagely] That'll be the reason, then.
     
  6. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    What qualifications do you have?
     
  7. Master degree in Music and Aesthetic
     
  8. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    That's impressive but I don't agree with those who have told you that you are over-qualified to be a music teacher.
    Now, do you type really quickly or is there something wrong with your 's' key? Is it possible that v2 was correct about your written applications?
     
  9. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

  10. v12

    v12

    Of course, one of the problems with Suffolk at the moment is the forthcoming closure of the middle schools, where all the music teachers will be applying to their respective feeder/fed schools in the vain hope of redeployment.
    And as you will know, the music service here is also being cut back as the funds are being diverted from music to other areas.
    Have you tried sending your CV to all the independent schools in Suffolk? There may be the odd day or two per week for instrumental teaching - or possibly cover work for absent music teachers.
    I have 17 peripatetics working for me, and am always looking for names to add to my contact list - I daresay that other similar schools in Suffolk will have a similar requirement to mine.
    I can't imagine how your Masters degree is an over-qualification in your applications - if anything it would show me a real commitment on your part!

     
  11. spanboy

    spanboy New commenter

    I think poor spelling/grammar will hinder your chances of getting a job, especially in the classroom.
    I wouldn't employ someone who can't spell the instrument that they play (sax<u>o</u>phone).
    Sorry to sound harsh. I presume you're not a native of the UK?
     
  12. No, I m not. Sorry I don&rsquo;t want sound harsh but 60% of English people can&rsquo;t spell.
    I can speak 3 others languages and English isn&rsquo;t my native language but I do maximum to reach the standards .
    I found very discriminate people judging your small spelling errors but not your knowledge in subject.

     
  13. Yes I think I type sometimes quickly and without checking key. But I always ask my partner or friend just check my application. It&rsquo;s just in case and they can point any mistake which I can avoid for next time.
    I think what doesn&rsquo;t help at present time I working in catering industry.
    It may be a point why people overlook my applications.

     
  14. spanboy

    spanboy New commenter

    Look at it through the eyes of an employer reading a CV: when they see spelling errors it's not so much the ability to spell correctly that worries them but the fact that that the candidate HASN'T EVEN BOTHERED to check his or her spelling. It's a question of attitude - do they want to employ someone who they PERCEIVE as being lazy?
    On making a good first impression this is VITAL
    It doesn't matter HOW talented you are at music, if you can't get to the interview stage because apathy has let you down when writing your CV/covering letter etc.then no-one will ever know how good you are!
    As a parent I would expect my child's teachers to have a decent standard of spelling and grammar, irrespective of nationality. I think most parents would!!!
    I really am not being picky but think that you may benefit from placing more importance on good English than you do currently - especially in education.
     
  15. It isn't harsh to expect all teachers to have good command of written and spoken English, irrespective of home language. I am a teacher trainer. We have many overseas trained teachers who we don't let loose in the classroom until they are not making basic grammar errors and can punctuate properly. Parents have a right to expect this as a minimum standard from teachers, surely.
     

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