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Multiplication games...

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Ktteaching, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. Hi I wonder if anyone could give any advice on my ideas for a lesson tomorrow. We are being 'visited' by the delight of Ofsted soon and the focus are SMT want us to look at is maths teaching. I am being observed tomorrow on Year 4 Block B Unit 2 with the LO: To be able to derive and recall multiplication facts for the 6 times table (as my class are still struggling on the 6x tables.
    I have an idea of starting the lesson with the numbers from the 6 times table laid on the carpet and they then rearrange them in the correct order and then I can ask questions from this. I am being observed half way through the lesson when the chn will be doing their activities. I have ideas for bingo, dominoes, racing car game all with x6 tables on them for my middle, same activities with x3 tables for my lower and grid multiplication x6 for my highers. I am unsure however if this will be challenging enough for my highers and if the activities for my middles are going to take an entire lesson.
    Any advice or thoughts on this would be really appreciated

     
  2. Hi I wonder if anyone could give any advice on my ideas for a lesson tomorrow. We are being 'visited' by the delight of Ofsted soon and the focus are SMT want us to look at is maths teaching. I am being observed tomorrow on Year 4 Block B Unit 2 with the LO: To be able to derive and recall multiplication facts for the 6 times table (as my class are still struggling on the 6x tables.
    I have an idea of starting the lesson with the numbers from the 6 times table laid on the carpet and they then rearrange them in the correct order and then I can ask questions from this. I am being observed half way through the lesson when the chn will be doing their activities. I have ideas for bingo, dominoes, racing car game all with x6 tables on them for my middle, same activities with x3 tables for my lower and grid multiplication x6 for my highers. I am unsure however if this will be challenging enough for my highers and if the activities for my middles are going to take an entire lesson.
    Any advice or thoughts on this would be really appreciated

     
  3. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    Hi Kt, a really good pairs activity for your highers is for each of them to have a set of cards with 1 to 6 written on. Shuffle them and put them down on the table. At the same time each turns over one of their cards. They must multiply them mentally and be the first to call out the correct product.
    The first one to call it correctly gets a point - first to 5 wins. Or 10. Or 23 - what the heck, you're in charge!

    And if any claim to know all of their tables, give them 1-10 cards instead of 1-6 ones. Good luck.
     
  4. Oh I really like that idea, thanks! I know that most of my highers can work out their times tables up to 6 (even if not immediately!) Do you think this activity would be OK for the LO of x6 knowledge as they will also be practising other tables? Also do you think that this will last a whole lesson or should I get them to do some grid multiplication first?
     
  5. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    You can limit the level by giving one child only a set of cards with 1,2,5 and 10 (for example) and the other child a set of 1-10 cards. This would allow you to target the tables they worked on.
    As to your other question, definitely not a whole lesson activity. To develop this, I would get them to make the important links between multiplication and division by giving them sets of cards such as 4,6 and 24 and asking them to come up with two multiplication sentences and two division sentences using the three numbers.
    Finally, why not get them to make up their own triads for each other? This can lead to some nice differentiation and of course a simple APP opportunity. Good luck!
     
  6. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    But first of all (sorry I have re-read your OP more carefully) with the whole class, use a counting stick with post-its and get them to count up and down in multiples of 6 (which are of course written on the post-its. (Each time slowly remove one or two of the post-its and see what they can remember.)
     
  7. How did you get on with your lesson?
     
  8. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    I was wondering that too Teragram. Did it go OK ?
     

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