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Mr Gibb's comments re GCSE

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by thrupp, Aug 26, 2011.

  1. Okay, is it just me. GCSE results are out, maths circa 58% A*-C and English circa 64%.
    Can someone please explain:
    1) Why are they not circa 80% as per end KS2 sats ?
    2) How improving the teaching of reading at primary is going to make such a big difference to these results?
    3) Why Gove seems to blame primary for everything?
     
  2. Okay, is it just me. GCSE results are out, maths circa 58% A*-C and English circa 64%.
    Can someone please explain:
    1) Why are they not circa 80% as per end KS2 sats ?
    2) How improving the teaching of reading at primary is going to make such a big difference to these results?
    3) Why Gove seems to blame primary for everything?
     
  3. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    1) They are completely different tests. GCSE English has little to do with testing competence to read/write English. Maths is a much broader and more difficult exam.
    2. It might help a bit with the poorest readers, but what children are weakest at when they hit secondary is the ability to write unaided (largely because the strictures of NC tests at KS2 have made their teachers teach writing too narrowly. I cannot blame for that, I'd do the same). Their reading is generally better than it was 20 years ago. He doesn't know what else to say, because he doesn't know what he's talking about.
    3) See my previous sentence.
     
  4. Thanks Middlemarch
    I think the level of maths, reading and writing countrywide is far better at primary now than it ever has been and tend to agree re writing.
    So, is the answer now to redesign and merge Upper KS2 and KS3 program of study/curriculum into one to ensure bredth of experience and progression that will meet the demands and needs placed on KS4 students?
    Or would that be a bit complex for Mr Gove and undermine the profits of Read Write inc.?
     
  5. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Don't be daft! That would be putting the needs of pupils first.
    You know perfectly well that's the last thing politicians think about in their endless quest to make themselves look better whilst simultaneously making teachers look ****.
     


  6. Sad, but true!
     
  7. Broader examinations, much more to teach and revise and test, more difficult to coach towards the test.
    Reading is fundamental to all students accessing the curriculum in all subjects. I teach science and cannot get away from long words, it's impossible to teach plants without the word photosynthesis for example. My bottom set Year 7s always struggle with written material in science, even instruction sheets. Personally I think their writing is far worse, they struggle to write more than a few sentences and their accuracy is poor.
    Because he isn't a teacher. He blames us in secondary when they're all rioting though!
     
  8. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Ridiculous. Everyone knows it's the primary schools' fault.
    *ducks*
     
  9. I know, it's because we don't leave work at 3.45 like our secondary sisters and brothers
    (hides behind wall)
     
  10. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Ha! A close friend who was a primary teacher once said to me 'You see all these secondary teachers leaving school at 3.45pm' and I replied 'HOW do you see them?'
     
  11. Things have got worse since my day, have science teachers stopped reading out passages from the text books to the class now, my god, they don't attempt to explain things do they?
     
  12. You'd have loved my (grammar school) maths teacher from 1978/9...
    He clearly wasn't happy at being given middle set rather than top set and his only response to failure to understand was to sigh deeply, shake his head, say it again the same only louder (whilst glaring at the offender)... and then move on.
    You quickly learned to keep your mouth shut and not ask questions.
    How I got a B is beyond me... The good old days weren't all that good...! Our maths classes were purely about passing exams, not learning maths (plus ca change...)
    My own kids' understanding of maths is definitely better than mine was at that age.
    C x

     

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