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Moving to UK to teach French

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by nsam0004, Dec 10, 2016.

  1. nsam0004

    nsam0004 New commenter

    Dear colleagues,
    I have recently made up my mind to quit my country to teach French in the UK. Coming from an EU country and an ex-British colony, teacher recruitment agencies told me that it should not be very difficult in securing a permanent post in the UK. I honestly look forward to starting a fresh page in the UK; however, I would like your opinions prior to making the move. Locally, many teachers are quitting the profession as well, mainly due to poor salaries. Also, from the feedback I got from the agencies, it seems like securing a French only post is not impossible. I do have knowledge of Spanish, but no formal qualification yet. What certification would one want to present if applying for a secondary specialism?
    I look forward to your answers.
    Regards
     
  2. JL48

    JL48 Star commenter

    Ireland, Malta or Cyprus?
    You'll feel right at home then.
    You certified in your home country? If so, you should be fine.

    How's your Maths? You'll have a wider pick of better schools if you teach Maths.
     
  3. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Good luck.
     
    sbkrobson, JL48 and dunnocks like this.
  4. nsam0004

    nsam0004 New commenter

    I come from Malta!
     
    JL48 likes this.
  5. nsam0004

    nsam0004 New commenter

    My Maths is good but only have GCE grade A.
     
  6. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    I think many language teachers might have the idea that teaching in Malta on a poor salary might be more pleasant (in so many ways) than teaching in the UK on a salary that does not stretch as far as you could imagine.
     
    JL48 and HelenREMfan like this.
  7. HelenREMfan

    HelenREMfan Star commenter

    I decided circa 1972 that teaching French to British children, especially the less academic who struggled to write a coherent sentence in English, was NOT the thing to do. I spent the rest of my teaching career keeping my qualification in teaching French as dark a secret as I could manage (let's face it teaching girls' PE at times strained things !) Over the length of my teaching career however I did see the struggle of many MFL teachers and too many mental health issues cropped up. For the vast majority of my years at that school it was a good place to be and had a good supportive staff so quite how things must be now in a not as good, supportive school I can't say.
     
    eljefeb90 likes this.
  8. JL48

    JL48 Star commenter

    There are conversion courses available. I'd go for that if I were you.
     
  9. nsam0004

    nsam0004 New commenter

    Thanks for your response. Where do these conversion courses exist please?
     
  10. nsam0004

    nsam0004 New commenter

    I honestly appreciate your honest answers!
     
  11. Nebka

    Nebka New commenter

    After teaching MFL in a big city comprehensive school for twenty three years, I would say think twice! However, I also taught in an Indi school and loved every minute of it! So, I guess select your school and area very carefully, do your homework first! Good luck.
     
    eljefeb90 likes this.
  12. stigofthedump

    stigofthedump New commenter

    If you are applying to teach 'just' French in a British School you will find it difficult as most MFL positions involve teaching more than one language. Maybe you could try to improve on your Spanish skills and offer teaching that to at least KS3. Good luck!!
     
  13. JL48

    JL48 Star commenter

    Maths. She should do one of the conversion courses and teach Maths.

    England isn't interested in learning foreign languages, and the English don't have a great deal of respect for teachers. After 6 months she'll be begging for her old badly paid job back in sunny pretty Malta.
     
    eljefeb90 and catmother like this.
  14. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    And Scotland is not any better!
     
  15. nsam0004

    nsam0004 New commenter

    Thanks for your reply. My Spanish is not as advanced as my French, but I have a good basic level. Do I need formal certification to offer it as a teaching subject at KS3? Thanks.
     
  16. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    No, you won't need a formal qualification in Spanish. If you can offer French to GCSE or A level, and Spanish in Key Stage 3, that would be acceptable in many schools.
     
    eljefeb90 likes this.
  17. nsam0004

    nsam0004 New commenter

    Hi, so you are saying that with a teaching degree in French plus a knowledge of Spanish without formal certification suffice to teach both? Thanks.
     
  18. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Yes. I did it the other way around. My degree and teaching qualification were in Spanish but I mainly taught French in Key Stages 3 and 4.
    I didn't become a teacher until my mid-40s in 1999. My last qualification in French was my A level in 1972. I studied French for one year at university in 1973, before changing to single honours Spanish.
     
  19. palmtree100

    palmtree100 Lead commenter

    Do you mind if I ask how long you continued teaching for?
     
  20. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I taught for about 12 years before retiring. I did long and short term supply placements. Initially I concentrated on MFL but latterly did general supply and taught all sorts of subjects.
     

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