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Moving to Qatar

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by baxiebabe, Mar 31, 2016.

  1. baxiebabe

    baxiebabe New commenter

    Hello. I know lots of this has been covered in various threads, and thank you to those of you that have helped with your useful posts, but I have my first interview coming up and am understandably very apprehensive. I'll be leaving my hubby at home and going to Doha for a period of time, rather than emigrating lock, stock and barrel. What can I expect from the interview? What sort of time frames are we looking at? And will I have to have a medical? Is that standard or just for the QP school in Dukhan? I am literally shaking at the prospect of what could be ahead...nerves, apprehension, excitement, all mixed together! I have never taught abroad before, but have several years UK experience. Any useful advice very welcome. Thank you.
     
  2. musikteech

    musikteech Occasional commenter

    I just received an email from QP last week. They rejected my application as a music teacher at one of their schools. I'm qualified as a music teacher in the UK and it must be because I haven;t been teaching music for a while that they rejected me. That's the only reason I can think of. QP seem very choosy. If you're up-to-date with teaching and references you might stand a good chance. Good luck!
     
  3. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    Time frame wise, things move quickly at first. It is dependant on how many applicants they have to interview. It could be a couple of days, to a couple of weeks before you hear anything. International school interviews are quite a bit less formal than the UK, they would want to know about you and whether you will fit, rather than an emphasis on qualifications and experience. A medical is not uncommon, and is probably a visa requirement. You might have to have an AIDS test, a long with other medical tests (yellow fever and hep A for Africa as an example). Just be yourself and good luck
     
  4. Roseea123

    Roseea123 New commenter

    Hi I'm due to do my medical soon and it is a lot of checks. The interview was a great one. I was given the ins and outs and nothing was made to sound perfect. In fact very honest and they really are looking for people who will be suitable and able to adapt as well as patient. Good luck. They offer a good package too. They do offer a good family package if you consider going as a family. So maybe discuss that as your husband could always follow later on if you're happy out there. I'm hoping to make it a long term thing rather than a trial. I'm so excited for what the future holds. Hoping I do pass the medical though as it is a very detailed one! Good luck. Be yourself and honest. They will appreciate that as that's what they want (my opinion)
     
  5. 325572

    325572 New commenter

    Hi , Ive had an interview and have been recommended for the job. How soon between the job offer letter/contract and the medical? Don't feel like i have the job until the actual offer letter comes through.
     
  6. Roseea123

    Roseea123 New commenter

    Hi well done. Usually a call from HR to discuss offer and then approx 7 days the offer and all other forms/documents. Long process but at least we have a few months to sort it before resigning. U will be adviced not to hand in your notice until all is sorted! That's the worrying bit. Getting so close but not 100% there. Suppose it won't feel real until on that plane! Ha. Good luck.
     
  7. musikteech

    musikteech Occasional commenter

    What's all the fuss about Qatar? How much is the medical for Qatar then? Can't your gp do one for free?
     
  8. flock1

    flock1 New commenter

    The medical is a formality one you arrive in Qatar. Without passing the medical, you will not get a resident's permit.

    But as far as I know, nobody has ever failed it. From memory this is what it entails:

    The school will organize someone to take you to a medical centre or hospital. Men and women will be separated. For me, as man, I had to stand bare-chested with an bunch of other men (mainly from the Indian subcontinent) and wait for my turn. I presume this doesn't happen to women. They did an x-ray or something of my chest and then weighed me, measured my height and looked disapprovingly at my beer belly. (I probably imagined this last bit.). Then I had to have a sample of blood taken. And that was it. A week or so later, I was given the all clear and got my RP.

    The medical is nothing to worry about.
     
  9. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    This is quite common for a lot of schools, and will be based on visa / employment requirements. Tests for TB, AIDS are very common, but also "general heath status" as it was called in Laos can sometimes be done. No musikteech, your GP cant do it, its generally done in the country you are planning on working in.
     
  10. musikteech

    musikteech Occasional commenter

    Not Saudi arabia. I believe you have to get a medical done in the Uk costing around £250 before you can get your work visa. This includes those diseases you mention. I think it's silly really as TB is so rare in developed countries and Aids you can live a normal life nowadays. It's good easy money for private UK doctors though. But if you get it done in-country in Qatar, then that's alright as it doesn't cost you anything upfront.
     
  11. baxiebabe

    baxiebabe New commenter

    Hi all. Thanks so much. Interview went well, no news yet. Another interview in a few days elsewhere (also Doha). My application was rejected without interview from QP in the end. I assume I just didn't have what they were looking for, fair enough!
    I am still a long way from making a decision. My motive is quite simple, having become disillusioned with teaching in the UK state sector (KS2) I want to reconnect with what being a teacher is all about again.
    I'm not asking anyone to make the decision for me, obviously, I just want to be armed with as much info as possible. What is the ex pat lifestyle in Doha really like? When the school day is over and my marking/planning for the next day done, in my mind I envisage myself shopping, sightseeing, meeting with other expats, going to the gym, cinema, book club...or is the reality that most expats don't mix and welcome new people, and I end up sitting in my apartment twiddling my thumbs?
    Am I tilting at windmills to think that I get the benefits of the job without the added workload/stress/poor management I have recently experienced in my UK job that I seeking to leave behind?
    And, I wonder if anyone can shed any light on this...is it realistic to expect that I can live out there term time and come back to the UK every main holiday (at my own expense I realise), or does that just not happen? I see my move as me still very much UK based, just away working during term times. If this is an unrealistic mindset I need to know that now.
    Thank you so much for any honest input anyone can give me.
     
  12. musikteech

    musikteech Occasional commenter

    If you fly home during holidays it will cost you a lot of money. Return flights between the UK and Doha are probably around £500. How much salary do you expect to get in Doha? What's wrong with KS2 teaching in the UK? Will it be any better in Doha I wonder?
     
  13. baxiebabe

    baxiebabe New commenter

    What's wrong with teaching in the UK? Workload, long hours, weekends and holidays spent marking and planning, stress, increasingly unrealistic targets, micro managing and monitoring...
    I am very aware that working in Doha might well be the same, which is what I am hoping to ascertain.
    I am not seeking any comments about finances/salary please as everyone's motivations are very personal on this one so I appreciate it's difficult to generalise, but from a job satisfaction/logistical/quality of life perspective from others who may have experience of what I am contemplating. Thanks.
     
  14. musikteech

    musikteech Occasional commenter

    I remember it was quite expensive for a meal when I popped into doha once for a few days. How much is it for a meal nowadays at a hotel restaurant in doha? Can't tell you about job satisfaction as I haven't taught there. I think you will need a car to get around. You can rent them I think. Take an international licence with you. Get it from the post office.
     
  15. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Hello, baxiebabe. Yes, by all means e-mail me and I can send you a lot of Doha-related bits and pieces. The TES conversation things are a bit annoying and awkward.
     
  16. T0nyGT

    T0nyGT Lead commenter

    People seem to get quite anxious about these medical exams, terrified that the examiner is going to diagnose some missed leprosy or something. My last international medical exam consisted of two separate tests, one physiological and one psychiatric.

    The psychiatric one was first. I sat down and the doctor gave me a long, silent look before saying "Well, you don't look crazy" and stamping my form.

    The physiological one (which was supposed to involve an x-ray to test for TB) was next. A different doctor asked me "Have you had an x-ray before?" to which I repled "Yes".

    "Did they see anything"
    "Well I don't think so but it was a while ago"
    "Ah, I'm sure they would have told you if it was anything serious

    Form stamped!
     
  17. 325572

    325572 New commenter

     
  18. 325572

    325572 New commenter

     
  19. 325572

    325572 New commenter

    Hi Have send you PM
     
  20. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    musikteech, yes, you can indeed hire cars in Qatar, but this is not a satisfactory long-term solution. Hire a car for your first month or two, but then most teachers will have to bite the bullet and buy a car. Public transport is patchy, expensive and not terribly reliable. Western ladies will not be happy on Doha's buses and standing on the street corner (while waiting for a taxi) might give some men the wrong idea. Yes, the traffic is getting worse each year, but what else can you do when the temperature is over 40 degrees C?
     

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