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Moving to New Zealand

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by irishcurlysue, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. Hi guys

    I am have been teaching for 8 years and have been Head of English in a secondary school for 3 years now. My hubby-to-be and I are seriously considering moving to NZ as we wanted a complete change. My big worry is how easy it would be for me to get a job in advance of going. Having read some of the forums on here and spoken to friends who live there, it seems that the picture is very bleak.
    What are the chances of me at least getting a classroom teach job before I go? How would I go about it? I have heard that chances for promotion are not favourable towards immigrants to NZ. Is this true? I am very frightened about not only going back to being a classroom teacher but also about the financial impact that this would have.

    My hubby-to-be is not a teacher but his company would allow him to work from home in NZ if he was to move so he would be doing exactly the same job.
    I would really appreciate any help/advice than anyone could give me.
     
  2. Hi guys

    I am have been teaching for 8 years and have been Head of English in a secondary school for 3 years now. My hubby-to-be and I are seriously considering moving to NZ as we wanted a complete change. My big worry is how easy it would be for me to get a job in advance of going. Having read some of the forums on here and spoken to friends who live there, it seems that the picture is very bleak.
    What are the chances of me at least getting a classroom teach job before I go? How would I go about it? I have heard that chances for promotion are not favourable towards immigrants to NZ. Is this true? I am very frightened about not only going back to being a classroom teacher but also about the financial impact that this would have.

    My hubby-to-be is not a teacher but his company would allow him to work from home in NZ if he was to move so he would be doing exactly the same job.
    I would really appreciate any help/advice than anyone could give me.
     
  3. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    Can't guarantee you'll get a job in NZ whilst based in the UK. It can be done*, and the job market here is fairly dynamic.
    The process of emigrating and working here is reasonably straightforward, if long winded. If you are serious and organised, then it shouldn't be too difficult to apply.
    Promotion prospects will depend on you.
    Overall, financially I am better off here than in the UK. Kind of. It's more of a lifestyle thing.
    The big 'Want to work and live in NZ is a better bet for any questions TBH. Don't worry about asking q's that have already been asked.
    Um. Yeah. Do it!
    *I did. Somehow.

     
  4. Thanks so much for your reply. I guess I wish I had done it a few years ago. Just worried that I am going to be back at square one as a classroom teacher when I have worked really hard here to get to be Head of English. I really do want to go but I guess I wish I knew if I could get a job and a promoted position. I heard on TES that NZ tends to promote Kiwis and not those who have immigrated.
     
  5. P.S. I am 30 years of ago.
     
  6. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    You might not waltz into an HOD job straight away, but there are an increasing number of jobs out there. Check out the Ed Gazette.
    I've met a few immigrant teachers in positions of responsibility. Three DPs from England for example.
     
  7. OP - have you been to NZ?
     
  8. Yeah I have been and really liked it though I wasn't there for long.
     
  9. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    Apparently living here is very different to coming here on holiday. Gosh. I wouldn't know personally as I applied to live here not having ever been to NZ. If it weren't for the fact that I had to come to renew a visa and visited for a week, I wouldn't have been here at all before I got here to live. My wife hadn't been here at all. Which was brave. Although as she said 'Bread and onions dear, bread and onions'. Which is I think an Argentinian saying from a Jilly Cooper book and means that whatever else happens so long as we are together, bread and onions is enough for us. You can make a most nourishing soup out of onions.
    Although living here and having a holiday whilst living here is a bit like not living here and having a holiday here, but better as it doesn't involve long haul flights.
    NZ is- to coin a phrase- a funny wee place. Some people don't like it, some people do. I suspect FP doesn't like it. Maybe he came here once and got molested by a kiwi or something. It might be he went to Dunedin. Which is like Scotland and he doesn't like Scotland. Maybe he went to Northland which is a bit tropical and hot and got prickly heat.
    NZ isn't for everyone; there are issues and problems*. Overall for us it has been a positive experience. Try it, you might like it. And if you don't, you don't.
    *And someone on this forum will provide you with a long and exhaustive list. Oh yes indeedy.
    Right, the little darlings have finished their lines, I can go back to marking...
     
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    My partner and I recently relocated to NZ (North
    Island). Without doubt NZ is a stunning place however, like the poster above
    mentioned it’s not for everyone.


    I managed to secure a teaching position before
    arriving here through the Education Gazette so that would be a good starting
    point. My best advice would be:


    [/b]
    - you must really check this out we are based on the East Coast and for us the
    area although beautiful is just far too quiet. Accommodation is not cheap at
    all and furnished accommodation compared to UK standards is quite different -
    furnished could be classed as supplying a sofa and that’s it. Check out www.trademe.co.nz which is one of the
    most popular sites used in NZ and it will give you an idea of properties
    available and the rental prices.


    Schools
    &ndash; </u>[/b]Each school is rated with a decile number from 1 &ndash; 10 the lower the
    number the lower the socio- economic rate. The school I am working at is a
    decile 2 and behaviour throughout the school is an overall issue. Fully research
    any school beforehand, a large majority of kids at the school where I teach come
    from very poor backgrounds and a lot are part of gang families which is quite
    prevalent in this area. I asked lots of questions during the interview and a lot
    of this information I was not made aware of. Really what I am trying to say is
    just don&rsquo;t accept any job because it is in NZ make sure it&rsquo;s the right school
    for you.


    [/b]
    &ndash; where we are based public transport is not the best, no trains and 1 bus per
    hour, so you need to check this out unless you would plan on buying a car
    straight away.


    [/b]
    - wages are less than the UK however, the cost living is the same if not more
    expensive in some parts especially the area we are. You will have to have your
    salary assessed and after 4 weeks I am still being paid the untrained teaching
    rate (I have been informed that this is normal and have not heard any good
    reports about the payroll department and you can only contact them by post
    which is incredibly frustrating). So if you do move here bring some extra cash
    with you.


    Medical
    care</u> [/b]&ndash; this is not free and it&rsquo;s not cheap so you also have to budget
    for medical insurance costs each year and for a good one this would probably work
    out at around 350 to 400 pounds per year each. That is what I was quote and
    from a lot of insurance providers.


    Qualification
    assessment</u>[/b] - you will need to have your qualifications assessed and if
    you really want to make the move I would get onto this before you move out to
    NZ it will speed up the process and make you more employable. This you will have
    to oragnise yourself - schools do not help out with this. There are a few
    teaching agencies who I also initially registered with and they also advised
    that before I would even be considered for any role I would have to do this
    straight away. I must also warn you that the whole process is quite costly.


    Overall, I am glad that I moved here otherwise I
    would have had regrets. I do know that where I am living now is not right for
    me and I may have felt differently if I had moved to one of the larger cities.
    My partner and I previously lived in Asia for 3yrs before moving to NZ so it
    was always going to be a big change. We both just now feel that although a lovely
    country it is just not right for us.


    If it&rsquo;s a long
    term move you are planning I would maybe suggest you visit first but only if
    this is a viable option for you.


    I hope that this info helps, like I said NZ is
    for some people but not for others I just want to try and hopefully provide you
    with some useful advice. Best of luck with whatever you decide.













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  11. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    Pretty small.

    And probably not much better once you get there. English, as everywhere, is not a shortage subject, and unless you go to Auckland you will probably find that a huge preference is given to locals - at least that's how it works in Christchurch.

    Also, it's important to remember that even if you are prepared to work as an ordinary teacher again many HODs will feel too threatened to give you a job.
     
  12. English has been a shortage subject in secondary schools in NZ for some years now. That said, there's a strong cultural element to English so foreign teachers have to do a bit of study to get up to speed with a NZ body of literature and local cultural references.
    Any decent school will try to appoint the best person for the job. If HODs are acting as David says, then school management is not doing its job and you probably wouldn't want to work there anyway.
     
  13. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    Then, my apologies. From my time in NZ, I didn't think this was the case.

    I wish it were that simple. Unfortunately, the principal can't be a specialist in all subjects, so most of the time (s)he has to rely on the integrity of the HODs.
     
  14. I echo what was said about HODs/positions of responsibility. I have seen heaps of these posts occupied by Brits and other foreigners. But I wouldn't expect to be hired directly into one. Especially not from overseas.
    You'd have to 'earn your stripes' by becoming familiar with the NZ context first. Your best bet would be to find a school that offers Cambridge, rather than the local qualification (NCEA).
     

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