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morning -good behaviour - afternoon - poor behaviour - any advice!?!?!

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by joannaharrison86, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. I'm a NQT, just started first job as a yr 4/5/6 teacher,done a year of supply so have had many experiences of challenging pupils/classes, but in this class, I cannot change them. In the morning they are generally focused and engaged, and I have a TA who is meant to be a class TA but I have her working with the one boy who will continuious call out, move around the classroom, roll on the floor, call other pupils names and generally disruptive if no adult is with him.
    But, once the afternoon hits, they take usually between 15-20 mins to settle and for the rest of the afternoon less focused and chatty and this boy becomes very disruptive and I can't focus on him as I have another 26 pupils to work with. His behaviour usually kicks off another 2-3 pupils and I've nearly had a couple of voilent outbursts and very rude behaviour.
    We've discussed rule, expectations, they know how to behave, we have rewards and sanctions.
    I know that the afternoon is usually a little harder as they're tired and worked up but even when we have PE, pupils who are usually good are playing up. I'm also aware that it is the first full week of term and it takes a while to settle, but I'd like to get this sorted as soon as possible so this doesn't continue. The afternoon is always runied as always having to moan or tell off someone and I was just wondering if anyone had any tips or ideas. As a phase group we are thinking of introducing a 10 min break outside during the afternoon to help, but so far I've not been able to do it as their unsettleness means I don't have time to do so.
    Any advice or tips would be great - just don't want to start dreading the afternoon of being in my class on my own!
     
  2. I'm a NQT, just started first job as a yr 4/5/6 teacher,done a year of supply so have had many experiences of challenging pupils/classes, but in this class, I cannot change them. In the morning they are generally focused and engaged, and I have a TA who is meant to be a class TA but I have her working with the one boy who will continuious call out, move around the classroom, roll on the floor, call other pupils names and generally disruptive if no adult is with him.
    But, once the afternoon hits, they take usually between 15-20 mins to settle and for the rest of the afternoon less focused and chatty and this boy becomes very disruptive and I can't focus on him as I have another 26 pupils to work with. His behaviour usually kicks off another 2-3 pupils and I've nearly had a couple of voilent outbursts and very rude behaviour.
    We've discussed rule, expectations, they know how to behave, we have rewards and sanctions.
    I know that the afternoon is usually a little harder as they're tired and worked up but even when we have PE, pupils who are usually good are playing up. I'm also aware that it is the first full week of term and it takes a while to settle, but I'd like to get this sorted as soon as possible so this doesn't continue. The afternoon is always runied as always having to moan or tell off someone and I was just wondering if anyone had any tips or ideas. As a phase group we are thinking of introducing a 10 min break outside during the afternoon to help, but so far I've not been able to do it as their unsettleness means I don't have time to do so.
    Any advice or tips would be great - just don't want to start dreading the afternoon of being in my class on my own!
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Hi Joanna
    If you've been on supply then you might have missed out on one of the most powerful factors in behaviour management: time, and the effect it has on the teacher/ student relationship (I'm only guessing, of course). If you've been at school since the beginning of this term (a week or two?) then you've had a very short time with them indeed.
    This is significant because the children will, quite naturally, test your boundaries and see how much they can get away with. This isn't because they're odd, cruel or savage, but simply children, curious and somewhat egoistic. I'm guessing/ hoping that you've made your classroom rules and expectations clear to them from day one? If you haven't, this needs to happen straight away- and I mean a formal session where the need for rules is discussed (or better still, simply told to them because really they're not up for negotiation).
    The next necessary step is, of course, teaching them the grand law of consequence, and that you will be a perfect agent of its execution. In other words, you'll punish and praise as their behaviour dictates. You need to be ruthlessly efficient about this, and always say what you mean. If you say, 'You mustn't shout out,' then don't let ANYONE do it, and set some kind of consequence- some missed break? A stern chat? Phone call home? You judge- that lets them all know that you mean business.
    This boy who's decided to roll around your room needs to receive some kind of consequence every time he acts like a ****. His outbursts will infect the other members of your class, and the paradigm will change as they notice that if HE can get away with it.....
    You'll probably find that his unlovely behaviour is setting a trend in the classroom, and that if you can sort him out, the others will settle. But in the meantime, the normal rules need to apply for them too; so make it clear that if they can't settle quickly enough, there will be some kind of consequence for them too. Even little ones can do the maths on that one. They're perfectly capable of behaving, remember. They just choose not to, or haven't been habituated into it yet. But mostly it's just their choice. You need to help them see that choosing your lovely path will lead to the secret garden of learning, while walking their own road will prove prickly.
    Of course, no one willingly feels comfortable setting sanctions with students- it's natural to resist being punitive. But unless the consequences of their actions make them uncomfortable, there's no incentive for them to walk on Straight Street. And you need to be the instrument of this adjustment.
    Good luck
    Read more from Tom here on his personal blog, or follow him on Twitter here.

     
  4. Thanks Tom,
    I'm trying to follow your advice and stick to my guns about behaviour and hopefully with more time there will begin to be positive changes!
    Oh, and the boy has now been moved to another class, but as always, when there's a gap to be filled, someone will step in!

    Thanks again!
    Jo
     
  5. I'd work on trying to calm the whole class down after the break in the afternoon. Try quiet reading and taking the register in silence. Make sure you talk softly and go slowly.
    In the worst case scenario you could always look into group meditation.
     

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