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More Confessions

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mermaid, Jan 26, 2010.

  1. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I started a thread this morning that I thought would generate some interest. It didn't, so I'll paste and post it on here instead since I think it's important and am surprised that others don't also find it so.
    Does anyone else believe, as I do, that all the time we spend
    with infants and lower juniors telling them about the above would be better
    spent just telling them many more of the stories themselves? I
    sometimes think I'll scream the next time I read the phrase`features of.
    This
    is heresy at the moment but I predict that, sometime in the next few
    years, the advisors and experts will realise that what I say is true
    [blindingly obvious, actually] and crow over their wonderful discovery.
    I posted this on Primary but thought that it might be of interest to people who post on English as well.

     
  2. Yeah, I hate 'features of' too.
    I confess that I do far too much printing and no, I will not get it photocopied instead because I am far too disorganised to get the Photocopying Request Slip signed by the relevant Head of Department and then given to the Photocopying Lady 24 hours in advance. Stop treating us like children and I will stop printing so much. I do buy my own paper.
    I have never listened to a word of what is said in any inset training and spend my time checking which members of SLT are texting under the table.
    I am far too sarcastic with my class.
    I HATE teaching ICT with a passion because a) I don't always know what I'm doing and b) the frigging equipment never works.
    It's me who sometimes forgets to get her class to plug the laptops back into the trolley.
    Teaching 10 year olds how to recognise an abstract noun or a subordinate clause makes me want to weep.
    When the Head sends yet another email or another powerpoint round with 'helpful' suggestions on 'what Ofsted might be looking for' I only read them to check how many spelling mistakes she has made, and then I delete them.
    I don't always follow the behaviour code to the letter and occasionally make up my own rules depending on what day of the week it is.
    I am genuinely touched when my children make me cards / give me little notes.
    I am always filled with terror when a parent calls asking for a word.
     
  3. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    I managed to not save my maths planning when I did it at the weekend and I'm not going to waste time writing it all up again so I'm going to go from memory and tweak as I go along. This means I won't be submitting any maths planning this week and am excited to find out if I get away with it or not.
     
  4. Ishamel

    Ishamel New commenter

    Bump bump bump this thread! Awesome to hear all of these!
    Confession 1: I give all of the kids nicknames in my head and sort them into Hogwarts houses - Ravenclaw for the swotty ones, Hufflepuff for the thickies and Gryffindor for the cheeky middling ones. There is only one Slytherin, and it's the one who is always telling on the other children 'miss miss Jimmy stole my rubber' [​IMG] I don't care you little ****


     
  5. Heres mine as a final year student who is not going into the profession, with one lecture of university left


    I hate how 80% of the people in my cohort won't shut up and listen. I know its boring, I'm perhaps more bored than anyone in the room but show some bloody respect.


    I hate rudeness in all forms, especially those at uni who've clearly never been told 'no' by their parents


    One particular girl who wears never takes her hat off, even on university trips. See rudeness above


    I hate that, as I've been on the course longer than most, I've seen firsthand ideas praised as excellent in my first year now regarded as hopeless. I could have told you that from day 1


    I hate how the courses are so over-subscribed. Even for those that are looking for jobs, theres so few available


    I hate how the university only just mentions this, but I hate moreso that people seem shocked. A little research could have told you this months ago


    I hate how I have to write assignments about things which I don't agree with, and find evidence to back up these things. I've wrote excitedly about all manner or rubbish, for inclusion to differentiation, from the need for APP to the importantce of not telling children off for fear of damaging confidence


    I hate parents who let their children get fat. I'm not exactly super-slim, but thats my own doing. Stop feeding your children s**t every day and take some interest in their wellbeing.


    On that note, I hate it when children drop their dinner on their tops on monday, and its still there on friday.


    I hate parents who drag their children by the arm, or let them walk 20 paces behind them. Fantastic parenting, bravo.


    I hate that you don't find out the 'real' side of teaching (unworkable policies, obscene paperwork etc) until your a few years in. At this point you can either pack it all in and waste a fortune, or stay with it and at least get something for your money. I've done the latter


    I hate how every lecturer rambles endlessly about how fantastic teaching is. If's its so fantastic, why did you leave? Some of them are in their early 30s, it can't have been that good


    I hate the constant changing of terms. Can't say brainstorm anymore, what that? Its now called mind mapping? **** off.


    I hate that, as a male on placements, I was treat with an oppressive amount of suspicion, as if I were a child-catcher


    I hate useless feedback from certain mentors. I've had one mentor who really cared about making me a better teacher, the other 3 on different placements would just say "Well, that didn't go very well did it?". Cheers for the confidence boost


    I hate how I have been driven out of a profession which I truly enjoy by virtue of it being nothing like I imagined. If I'd wanted to sift through paperwork and justify every aspect of my being, I'd have worked for the council


    I hate how as a male teacher I have to wear a shirt, tie and suit trousers regardless of the weather. If its too hot, I sweat, if its too cold, I freeze unbearably.


    I hate how the majority of the female teachers can wear whatever they please. Call me old fashioned, but teachers should dress smartly. Boots, dresses and miniskirts are a no go as far as I'm concerned.


    I hate that again, as a male, I can't pick any children up. This sounds creepier than it is, but if a child falls over, cries and wants a hug, I have to look at them blankly and do nothing for fear of being accused of something


    I hate teachers/headteachers who dont look at me when they're talking to me. See rudeness.


    I hate that my third placement was excellent, with an extremely friendly staff who boosted my confidence no end. They won't be forgotten


    I hate that my final placement was the polar opposite.


    There we go, sorry for being a list of 'I hate', but it felt good!
     
  6. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    *passes MrBlack a large gin and pats on back sympathetically* *thinks about fetching a paper bag to breathe into*
     
  7. FenellaF

    FenellaF New commenter

    I have different tables for different abilities, as I'm sure we all do. However, my bottom table is affectionately known as the TAF table - Thick As ****
     
  8. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Every day when I take the register, I go down the list and say good morning to each child... Sometimes I when I hear certain children reply, my heart sinks and I wish they would just take one day off to give me a break and some peace and quiet for once!
     
  9. PeggyDee

    PeggyDee New commenter

    I hate that I have to teach a 11 yr old boy who is rude (has called me some choice words to my face and every other word is a four letter one starting with F), smelly, arrogant and incredibly disruptive.
    If the lesson is not challenging enough it is "boring, stupid and childish" and if it is challenging it is just "boring and stupid and what does he need to know this for anyway?" because his ambition in life when he leaves school is to get money from his mum who "doesn't do anything, she sits at home and watches TV". In other words his ambition is to claim benefits, so what does he need science for? And why spoil it for the rest of the class?
     
  10. FenellaF

    FenellaF New commenter

    Dur PeggyDee, he needs science to be able to work out the weed:tobacco ratio in his spliff that gives the optimum smoking time. Tut. :)
     
  11. mantilla

    mantilla New commenter

    • My job share partner and I keep quiet about APP in the hope that nobody else will mention it either.

    • We also conspire not to show parents the children’s books on parents’ evening.

    • I love being part-time and conveniently arranged my days to avoid staff meetings. I haven’t been on INSET in the last 2 years either.
    * I swan off on Thursdays and happily wish everyone a good weekend. I do feel a little bit guilty about this...

    • I pretend not to know about paperwork I am supposed to have done.

    • I too am often the one who ate the last biscuit (or last few biscuits).

    • 8 children were away last week and it was bliss!

    • I am about to go on maternity leave and started counting how many days were left way before this term started.

    • I have kept quiet about how I used to be an ICT subject leader because I know it would make more work for me.

    • I am worried that one day someone will find me out as a rubbish teacher.

    • I dread it when parents ask for a quick word, or if the head calls me into her office. So far these worries have been completely unfounded.

    • I love mentally collecting the funny things children say, especially when they get a bit muddled between religions in RE.

    • I still enjoy teaching!


    That felt good.

     
  12. crysys

    crysys Occasional commenter

    I'm busy trying to pass of my 'senior' moments as 'having fun!' e.g. Today I spent ages trying to locate my glasses. The kids watched bemused and then decided to tell me that I was already wearing them!
    Oops! :)
     
  13. I really shouldn't bring up an older thread but I'm on holiday and I've spent a lot of my chilling time out reading this thread and feeling uplifted as an NQT worrying I'm not good enough as there are so many things I don't do or do properly!

    I confess I don't understand and thus use success criteria. I don't like APP. I like target setting but only if used properly. What's the point in saying a child has achieved a target when they don't then do it a week later? At least see them do it several times independently before ticking it off. I don't understand the literacy framework, and find most of it pointless. I plan to what the children need, and use genres as a context. My children need to know how to form a grammatically correct sentence, not to write in the style of an author who is one of many millions of styles. I can't stand bad grammar and spelling and would be quite happy spending every literacy hour teaching that and learning spellings rather than writing a list of the features of a play script which probably none of my children will ever need to use in later life. I also think guided reading is a waste of time (especially mine) and I would rather spend the time listening to children individually and get them to write sentences properly with a full stop, which most of my y5s can't. I confess I love it when annoying children are away ill. I hate tale-telling children and usually just say 'thanks for telling me'. I don't see the point trying to sort out two children who have completely different accounts and have no intention of tellin the truth. I hate teaching PE an PSHCE. It doesn't matter how many lessons you do on 'getting along', they still want to strangle each other.
     
  14. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    Ah, reading the recent posts, I see a new aspect we have yet to explore...

    What happens when the HT is not in school?

    1. Longer playtime in the morning (naturally)
    2.......
     
  15. 2...The bitching about her in the staffroom is approximately 50% more vitriolic.
    3....
     
  16. saying a child is mental. They have just drank dirty paint water, if I did that in the staff room what would you say about me.

    Not informing parents if their child has hurt someone, why bother as it was at lunch and the shrug won't change the past or stop them doing it later in the week.
     
  17. 9. Leave your class for a few minutes to see what your colleagues are up to.
    10...
     
  18. onmyknees

    onmyknees Established commenter

    10. We would hardly notice.
    11....
     
  19. On the day I left, I spent the afternoon wandering the corridors and chatting. I'm sure my class were fine.
    I confess I probably took enough paper and card for my own children to have the best-stocked craft cupboard for many a year yet.
     
  20. Ramjam

    Ramjam New commenter

    LOL

    I hate:
    - learning walks with helpful comments, carried out by teachers who couldn't teach in my year group.
    -Y6 Staff who always claim that any progress children have made us all due to their brilliance and any failures are down to the incorrect assessments in KS1.
    -Parents who criticise me for sending children out late on Thursdays after PE, when the real cause is the fact that they still dress their children and I won't do more than fasten the odd button or shoe lace.
    -staff who think my PPA time is really to free me up to fix computers and yes I do refuse, but the interruptions drive me insane
    - the whole collection of acronyms which seem to increase year on year
    - guided reading, when everyone really knows children make better progress if they read individually
    - the endless rewards for badly behaved children. If rewarding them for sitting still or not shouting out for 5 minutes or not hitting anyone they choose has not stopped them doing those things by Y2 or Y3, then it's a rubbish strategy. My strategy for those I deal with is to threaten them with punishment if they don't behave. It works! ( but I hate having to wait till their SSA is out of the room before I can use the threat so I am not regarded as an evil person who doesn't understand their problems. )
    Agree with almost everything on here but nice to have a rant.
     

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