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moderating writing levels - how do you do yours?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by groovyshell83, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. groovyshell83

    groovyshell83 Occasional commenter

    We are having a moderation staff meeting this week where we are moderating two year groups writing levels. In the past, these meetings have not been very beneficial due to lack of focus, lack of experience levelling and a lack of agreement over what different levels 'look' like. Does anyone have any good ideas that have worked well in their schools? Or any advice?
    Thankyou in advance
     
  2. groovyshell83

    groovyshell83 Occasional commenter

    We are having a moderation staff meeting this week where we are moderating two year groups writing levels. In the past, these meetings have not been very beneficial due to lack of focus, lack of experience levelling and a lack of agreement over what different levels 'look' like. Does anyone have any good ideas that have worked well in their schools? Or any advice?
    Thankyou in advance
     
  3. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    We take examples of the same level from different year groups, so one moderation meeting will focus on, say 3A work. Each teacher brings along a piece of work they think is a 3A, from whatever year group. We then sit round with the APP grid and look for evidence in each piece of work for all the criteria. By the end we have agreement on what a 3A looks like across the school.
     
  4. groovyshell83

    groovyshell83 Occasional commenter

    Does everyone take part in this? The problem that we have is that alot of our teachers are very new so have only been in one year group so therefore reception teachers will not have any 3a work as an example and year 6 will not have any work that is at their level or of those being brought by year 1 teachers. Do you think this model would work if we split up in to key stages to find similar levels? But then what would you suggest the reception teachers do?
     
  5. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    There are only 4 of us which does make things slightly easier and we each have 2 year groups so we have quite a spread of levels in each class! However, whether you have a particular level in your class or not, teachers should still be able to identify evidence and interpret APP statements( although I did once have to explain that comma splicing was a BAD thing!) . If you have more year groups however I would suggest that you do split into key stages, otherwise the meetings will become too unwieldy and , as you say, of little relevance to some!
     
  6. groovyshell83

    groovyshell83 Occasional commenter

    I know how you feel about the comma splicing thing - I too have experienced this. Thankyou for your help. I will put it to the rest of slt and see what they think!!
     
  7. We do very similar in our school. We began looking at level 2s so everyone felt involved - year 6 need to know where they're coming from and reception where they're aiming for. To add to the fun I took a few samples from different year groups and typed them up so that hand writing & spelling didn't interfere with professional judgement. It was a very valuable discussion and provided a good stepping stone to the 2a/3c discussion that pops up every year with year 2 and year 3! (We then created a portfolio of levelled work that we could all refer to).

    If you're a big school then splitting into key stages would work, but I'd certainly look into a cross key stage split if you could - perhaps reception and year one work together to ease that transition, years 2 and 3, and the 4 - 6?
     
  8. What a good idea to type them up! I'm stealing this! Thank you.
     
  9. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    Same as jenniwillis, we look at the boundaries first, from 2A to 3c, from 3A to 4c and from 4A to 5c as these are the ones where the most disagreements seem to occur ( especially 2A to 3C for some reason!) We also have "anonymous" sessions with typed or scribed examples-as we are a small school we have a good idea of whose work is whose and it can cloud your judgement! We also have a portfolio for examples of work at different sublevels together with commentary on what is needed to move to the next level and an APP grid completed to show what elements we are agreed are shown in the piece of work. It all helps!
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We do much the same ... although we use the criterion scale rather than APP
     

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