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Mnemonics used in your English lessons

Discussion in 'English' started by rach166, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. Hello,
    I am an NQT starting my first teaching post in September. I was wondering what mnemonics you all use in your classroom and how successful are they for your students? I have seen PEE (L), POAMS, and AFOREST successfully. If you could note down any that you use and what they stand for that would be great!
    Thanks :)
     
  2. Hello,
    I am an NQT starting my first teaching post in September. I was wondering what mnemonics you all use in your classroom and how successful are they for your students? I have seen PEE (L), POAMS, and AFOREST successfully. If you could note down any that you use and what they stand for that would be great!
    Thanks :)
     
  3. Lidnod

    Lidnod Star commenter

    Similar to PEE, but not as funny [​IMG] is PEA: Point Evidence Analysis. I have also see PQC which is Point Quote Comment. All the same idea!
     
    WOMANONAMISSION50 likes this.
  4. Yes, I remember when I was a pupil we used SEA Statement Evidence Analysis in school.
     
    WOMANONAMISSION50 likes this.
  5. SMILE when analysing poetry- structure meaning imagery language effect
    A RIPE FOREST for analysing non-fiction media texts and composing argue/persuade essays : anecdote repetition imperatives pronouns exaggeration fact opinion rhetorical questions emotive language statistics triples
    SQUEAL for writing about literature- statement quotation understand explain additional info language
     
  6. fishtail

    fishtail New commenter

    FLIRT for poetry--Form, Language, Imagery Rhythm and Rhyme and Tone--though I use FLIRTS to get in Structure as well!
     
    janekwe1 likes this.
  7. I used RARE DECK to teach writing to argue:

    Rhetorical Questions, Anecdote, Reiteration, Exaggeration, Directed at Reader, Emotive Language, Counter-Argument and Key Points.
     
  8. Lidnod

    Lidnod Star commenter

    GAP - Genre Audience Purpose
     
  9. PALL- purpose audience language layout, also called PAF, with F being format
     
    WOMANONAMISSION50 likes this.
  10. Lidnod

    Lidnod Star commenter

    SLAPP - Structure Language Audience Purpose Presentational devices
    Isn't there a CAM(e)LS for poetry? Unfortunately I can't remember what the letters stand for!
     
    WOMANONAMISSION50 likes this.
  11. Brilliant mnemonics! I will definitely be using some of these in my teaching. Thank you :)
     
  12. I found this one somewhere on line a while ago and it has been really helpful:
    CHINFAT or FAT CHIN:
    consequently, however, indeed, nevertheless, furthermore, as a result,therefore.
     
    maqdas2002 and LucyJWheeler like this.
  13. ulysees

    ulysees New commenter

    LIST - Language, Imagery, Structure ,Tone ; for poetry .
     
    janekwe1 and WOMANONAMISSION50 like this.
  14. Lidnod

    Lidnod Star commenter

    TiPToP paragraphs = new paragraph for a new time, place, topic or person.
     
    janekwe1 likes this.
  15. TipTop is excellent. I will definitely be using that . :)
     
  16. I prefer SLIME to SMILE since it places meaning later in the process. SCASI is excellent for unseen analysis- subject, character, action, setting, ideas. It comes from the IB diploma originally... Otherwise the one we can't use is FOFO. - ^*^* off and find out! (thanks Larry). I use 3B4ME for that one.
     
    LucyJWheeler likes this.
  17. Lidnod

    Lidnod Star commenter

    Just remembered another one, CAST for use when writing about characters in plays: Character Action Staging Themes
     
  18. Dunk

    Dunk New commenter

    POO rule for apostrophes: Possession Or Omission. Don't do what I did though and get them to make posters. Bad move.
     
  19. I used to use PEE, but have 'upgraded' to PEtER:

    Point, Evidence, technique (identification of word class or language technique) Explanation/effect and Reader response

    this can be adapted to PEtEtER to include two quotations or PEtER/CEtER for comparative essays.
     
  20. gloucesterroad

    gloucesterroad New commenter

    SLITS - Subject, Language, Imagery, Tone, Structure - for poetry analysis


    FLIC - Font, Layout, Images, Colour - for non-fiction and media


    PEEWE - Point, Evidence, Explanation, Word, Explanation - for word-level analysis for weaker candidates.


    SOAPMAPS - Simile, Onomatopoeia, Alliteration, Personification, Metaphor, Adjectives/adverbs, Powerful Verbs, Senses - for analysis and creative writing.


    PEEPDE - Point, Evidence, Explanation, Point, Describe, Explain - for linking images and language in Section A of unseen media paper. The 2nd point should be a reiteration of the first.


    AFFORRESST - Address the audience, forceful phrases, facts, opinions, rhetorical questions, repetition, emotive language, statistics, superlatives, triples - for persuasion!



    (We love acronyms round our way!)
     
    WOMANONAMISSION50 likes this.

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