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mixing paint

Discussion in 'Art and design' started by dana_leigh, Jul 19, 2011.

  1. Has anyone ever tried to mix their own paint using pigments and acrylic medium?
    I'm curious about the possibility of teaching my year 9 students how to mix paint using a traditional method.
    The reason for this is I want to look at impressionism and how hugely important it was to them to be able to use tubes of paint instead of having to mix their own as artists before them.
    I thought about demonstrating this basically with powerpaint and acrylic medium so they can all create at least one colour paint using the traditional mixing and grinding method...
    Is it possible does anyone think? or not worth persuing at all?
    Cheers
    D_L

     
  2. Has anyone ever tried to mix their own paint using pigments and acrylic medium?
    I'm curious about the possibility of teaching my year 9 students how to mix paint using a traditional method.
    The reason for this is I want to look at impressionism and how hugely important it was to them to be able to use tubes of paint instead of having to mix their own as artists before them.
    I thought about demonstrating this basically with powerpaint and acrylic medium so they can all create at least one colour paint using the traditional mixing and grinding method...
    Is it possible does anyone think? or not worth persuing at all?
    Cheers
    D_L

     
  3. Honestly, I wouldn't bother... It can be expensive to buy enough acryilc medium for everyone -but, if money is no problem then go for it!
    However, I don't know how much they would get out of doing a lesson like this....most of them know how to mix powder paints from their primary schools so it will just seem like much and the same to them.
    Whatever you choose to do, have fun!
    [​IMG]
     
  4. The National Gallery do a workshop investigating paint and pigment and the science behind it
    http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/visiting/organise-a-group-visit/plan-a-school-visit/talking-paintings-secondary
    One of our chemistry teachers did with their students it quite a while back and said it was good. It is aimed at Alevel but you could ask them for the info
    Try linking up with your science department. It would be a great way of doing cross curricular work - Science for the chemistry of mixing the paint, geography for where the minerals are found etc. Food tech, vegatable dyes etc. You could investigate other binding mediums as well as acrylic
     
  5. Thanks very much for the opinons, I will certainly look into it and the cross curricular stuff seems like a good idea :)
     

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